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Discussion Starter #1
Are there any Peter Egan fans on this forum?

There's a dinner with Peter Egan at Quail Lodge and Golf Club in Carmel, California on 4 May. I will be attending, anyone else?

For more information on this event got to: TINYURL.COM/PETEREGAN

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Well, the evening with Peter Egan was a HUGE success and met all my expectations!

Plus riding the Pacific Coast Highway from San Louis, CA to Carmel was a special treat. My total trip form and to Houston, Texas was 3,921 miles and I enjoyed every minute of it. I'm somewhat surprised that there was not more interest in this event on this forum.
 

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All it takes is mo' money. I'm very glad that you were able to attend and enjoyed the ride to & fro, I am very envious. Which bike did you ride out & back?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
All it takes is mo' money. I'm very glad that you were able to attend and enjoyed the ride to & fro, I am very envious. Which bike did you ride out & back?
I thought long and hard about which bike to ride on this trip. The KLR is dead reliable and with Givi side cases and top box has decent storage. Plus, the Cee Bailey windshield provides adequate wind protection. My other bike is an Electra Glide Ultra Limited. It has good storage and wind protection, plus heated grips and cruise control. In the end I chose the Electra Glide because it's more comfortable. I was glad I did. On those long stretches of I-10 and I-40 the cruise control was pure luxury. And in the mountains where temps dropped to 40F with a light mist those heated grips were damn near a necessity.

See attached pics of Mert Lawill and Malcolm Smith from On any Sunday.

Best,

Jason
 

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Electra-Glide in Blue? :)

Yes, Planalp; Elisha Cook, Jr., was in that one! :)
I'm used to seeing the "Jr." tacked on at the end of his name, but noticed the "EGIB" opening credits listed him simply as "Elisha Cook." Must say, even Cook's most off-the-wall characters seem quite normal compared to Robert Blake........

Not to totally threadjack: I had no idea who Peter Egan was until I looked him up: I've never been a reader of motorcycling magazines. Sounds like it would have been an interesting evening.
 

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I think the whole dirt riding motorcycling world will cry when either Malcolm Smith or Mert Lawill pass to the Great beyond.

So that was an opposed 4 cylinder, flat head Zundapp? Any idea of the year? Beat the Honda Gold Wing by how many years?
 

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Zundapp? Here's a glimpse of a 1935 model:


Zundapp manufactured a very fast (75 mph) and powerful (200 cc two-stroke) SCOOTER in the 1950s and 1960s . . .
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
I think the whole dirt riding motorcycling world will cry when either Malcolm Smith or Mert Lawill pass to the Great beyond.

So that was an opposed 4 cylinder, flat head Zundapp? Any idea of the year? Beat the Honda Gold Wing by how many years?
The Zundapp in my photograph is a 1937 model with a horizontal 800cc 4-cylinder engine. But Zundapp's flat-four engine geometry goes back to at least 1932 and possibly earlier. Interestingly, Ferdinand Porsche was contracted by Zundapp in 1931 to design an economical automobile. A prototype was built with an air-cooled four-cylinder engine in the rear, but it was never put into production. Later, Hitler contracted Porsche to design the people's car or Volkswagen as we now know it. Eventually, Porsche designed a car with his name on it, the Porsche 356. And it's no surprise that it too had a four-cylinder air-cooled rear engine. So, if you've ever wondered why the Porsche 911 has a rear-engine configuration that is less than optimal for handling, well, it all started with the Zundapp car project and the Porsche purists who wouldn't let go.
 

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About rear-engined [EDIT: mid-engined, or non front-engined] automobiles:

In the 1930s, Germany's Auto Union (now, Audi) produced rear-engined [EDIT: as above] GP race cars. A problem: Ordinary humans, with muscle-memory associated with front-engined cars, had considerable difficulty handling the Auto Union machines on the racetrack because of the vehicles' profound oversteer characteristics.

The solution: Recruit motorcycle racers, who had never driven ANY automobile, and give them, "primacy," training on the Auto Unions.

The result: World GP championships for the rear-engined [EDIT: as above] Auto Unions.

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Sorry; no references nor citations. Just, "word-on-the-street!" :)

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EDIT: Thanks to Norton 850 for above edits.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
About rear-engined automobiles:

In the 1930s, Germany's Auto Union (now, Audi) produced rear-engined GP race cars. A problem: Ordinary humans, with muscle-memory associated with front-engined cars, had considerable difficulty handling the Auto Union machines on the racetrack.

The solution: Recruit motorcycle racers, who had never driven ANY automobile, and give them, "primacy," training on the Auto Unions.

The result: World GP championships for the rear-engined Auto Unions.

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Sorry; no references nor citations. Just, "word-on-the-street!" :)
Actually, the 1930s Auto Union racers had a mid-engine configuration, which is superior to rear engine. See below.


Jason
 

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Actually, the 1930s Auto Union racers had a mid-engine configuration, which is superior to rear engine. See below.


Jason
I stand corrected, regarding nomenclature. Please substitute, "mid-engined," where I used the term, "rear-engined," in my post above. Won't quibble over the definition regarding engine position. Thanks for the correction, Norton 850!

OVERSTEER was a problem unwary drivers struggled to overcome, men say. Thus, the recruitment of motorcycle riders without front-engined automobile experience to pilot these speedsters on racetracks, or so I heard/read. Wikipedia tells us, "The problem with early mid-engined design was the stiffness of the contemporary ladder chassis and suspension. The car's turning angle changed as the momentum of the centrally mounted engine increased on the chassis, causing oversteer. All Auto Unions had independent suspension, with parallel trailing arms and torsion bars at the front. At the rear, Porsche tried to counter the tendency to oversteer by using a then-advanced swing axle suspension on the early cars. On the later Type D, rear suspension was a de Dion system, following the lead of Mercedes-Benz, but the supercharged engines eventually produced almost 550 horsepower, which exacerbated the oversteer."
 
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