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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all

Once again in need of advice. My back brakes are about as effective as those of our local taxi drivers who use cardboard as brake pads. There is still plenty of pad left and i have tried bleeding them, the resevoir is full but they really suck. Any tips?

Have a great Easter.

For you guys in the States it's spring and here Autumn. No better time to ride
 

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You may want to up grade your brake line the stock dose have the tendancy to expand. there is also better pads out there as well but i would thy the line up grade first.:cool:
 

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I just replaced the rear pads on my '05 and discovered the inner pad was hanging up on plate. Removed the pad and filed it enough to clear and reinstalled it. Never have I seen this before but it was real. I used EBC sintered brake pads.

Make sure the brake caliper piston is functioning properly. Remove the caliper, remove the pads, remove the plastic that fits in the piston, check for debri and remove if there is any. Lightly press on the rear brake pedal while checking to see if the piston moves. The piston should move easily. Push the piston back in the caliper.

How bad was the fluid you flushed?

Rear brakes are never as effective as front brakes. Agree with the comment about the brake line but you should be able to tell if it is bad by looking at the brake line since it will be swollen and maybe just in a place or two. The inside of the brake line will break down and restrist the brake fluid flow.
 

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I'm betting that the line still has air in it.
This would be the simplest thing. Didn't he say they were bad before he flushed the fluid.
 

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Recently installed new brake pads and the rear caliper felt stiff or did not move easily.

To feel good about travleing with this caliper I need to pull it off and check it for proper function. What is the best method of testing the caliper / piston for proper movement? What do you do to check the caliper?

After the caliper is checked and working properly I am going to flush both calipers and fill with new fluid.
 

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Make sure the brake pads are seated properly in the retaining clips. If the pads are even a little out of place it will really limit the brake performance. The stock unit is capable of locking up the rear wheel so something is definately wrong with yours. Keep trying until you find it.
Really? I've never been able to lock the rear wheel on good traction surfaces.
 

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Yeah, I can lock my rear.
 

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Found this thread while searching around..

My 03 has the same issue... it won't lock the rear up on gravel, and on pavement, I can hardly tell it's working at all..

I flushed all the old fluid out, (wasn't all that bad) so I guess my next step is to remove the caliper and see if it is moving..

My concern is, not only do I have incredibly poor braking performance, but the pedal is super soft. It leads me to think that the master is internally leaking.
 

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yeah that's not right at all. i've always been able to lock it up when i want to. check your caliper pistons for sure.
 

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yeah that's not right at all. i've always been able to lock it up when i want to. check your caliper pistons for sure.
But if the piston was stuck, you'd think I would have a much firmer pedal.. mine is soft.
 

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i can lock up. much harder with full gear though. weight is a factor. i did have a pad hanging up on the caliper when i swapped them once though, and i think it felt soft if memory serves.
 

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so no pressure in the lines?
There is pressure, I bled the line a couple weeks back just to put fresh fluid in there. I wouldn't say it had a ton of pressure, but I was able to bleed it...

i can lock up. much harder with full gear though. weight is a factor. i did have a pad hanging up on the caliper when i swapped them once though, and i think it felt soft if memory serves.
Yea, the first thing to do (obviously) is to remove the caliper. I'll do that on my next day off..
 

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thats wierd, there are only so many possibilities as to why you arent getting a firm pedal...idk
 

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The older your lines get the more they expand too. A set of stainless steel brake lines takes alot of that "mushiness" away. Like was said, bleed them well and make sure the pads are seated...
 

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While you are at it... check everything.

- Does the rear brake line swell when pressure is applied? It shouldn't.
- Check the thickness of the rotor.
- Check that the piston functions both ways. There could be corrosion and road debris around the piston.
- Check that the is properly aligned to the rotor.
- Check to see if the pads are installed properly.
- Bleed the system before you do any of the above. As a precaution. Everybody makes mistakes.

My problem was the piston and road debris. Cleaned, pushed the piston in and out a few times, good to go.
 
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