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Discussion Starter #1
So my uncle has this old 1989 Kawasaki Tengai with 62.000 km on it, hidden in his workspace. Has been sitting completely still for a few years now. Piston and rings were replaced a few years prior to not running. Front forks make a weird "air escaping sound" when compressed. Both wheels don't turn very fluently. Electronics "should" work, he said. Some rust here and there. I'm thinking of restoring it. I'm quite handy but have no experience in tinkering with motorcycles.
So i'm guessing the work to just get it in a bit of a running condition, i'm looking at is:
  • clean carb and check if engine runs
  • rebuild forks
  • new wheel bearings
  • rebuild brakes and new pads
  • new battery and check electronics
At most, my question is how salvageable is this bike? Would i be in over my head on this?













 

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Wow. Just Wow!

That is the holy grail.

Hopefully, Uncle still has the side panels that go just below the seat.

It should not be too difficult to get it running again if it was running when it was put up. Your plan is sound, it can easily be salvaged, and it is not over your head. The members here can provide a lot of assistance if you run into issues. We can point you to video, articles, threads, and such like that to help you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hopefully, Uncle still has the side panels that go just below the seat.
Yeah, he still has the side panels, a top case, and some nobby tires laying around. From the front fender part, the previous owner had sawed off a piece of the plastic on both sides after a fall. (the radiator on the left side has a dent in it).

He ran the engine every once in a while but gave that up a few years ago. So it should still run. He claims the piston was replaced like 6-7 years ago.
I've been deep into youtube videos about KLR maintenance for a week now, and i thought i'd start this weekend by taking it apart, draining everything and getting to the carburator.

I was mainly worried i was way to into this bike and i would start on a loss.
 

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Wow!!! I'm speechless and jealous. You've got a beautiful project there but if you are worried I can relieve you of that. Keep us informed on your progress. Do you have a copy of the shop manual?
 

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If you are going into the carburetor you may find these videos of some use. there are five in the series:

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Do you have a copy of the shop manual?
Yup, found one on the internet in PDF after digging around!


And thanks for the video's, @Tom Schmitz. Very detailed and extensive! Watching those now, i think i know how i will spend my Saturday tomorrow!
I'll try my best to make a build log of everything, so my case will be documented for future readers.
 

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The bike looks complete. I am sure it will work very well when you finish restoring it. In this forum there are several people who know a lot and go out of their way to help. You have good allies in them. Congratulations for your project.
 

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Thanks for the support, guys!

I already took the carb out and opened it up. All internal parts look very good. The jets are not clogged up or anything! Gonna give it a good bath tomorrow and reassemble. But all of the tubes (except the choke and throttle) on the carb were not hooked up. My uncle started on it, i guess, and stopped some time ago. And so i'm not completely sure about 2 tubes.. While i'm working on it i'm also trying to understand how everything works, so i'll have a nice learning journey!



On the diagram,there are 3 hoses.

  • Orange (B) comes from the tank to fill the bowl in the bottom
  • Green (A) sits a bit higher than Orange, but what does it supply
  • Red is a mistery to me as it sits right next to the choke. So it's to supply gas for the choke?
If i find a battery, i put the clean carb back and hook it up, remove the old oil and get some new into the engine and see if she starts!
 

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Green (A), is the vent for the carb bowl. Without it the bowl would not be able to let fuel in through the float valve or out through the main jet. It should have a hose attached to it that runs down in front of the rear tire that fills with water and stalls the engine during stream crossings, causing you to lose forward momentum, topple over with the bike on top of you and leading to your demise via drowning. For future reference, Google "KLR650 T-Mod". You don't need a hose on there to start the engine.

Red is a vacuum port. On the Tengai there should be only one port and it should have a vacuum line going to the tank's petcock. The stock petcock is a vacuum operated affair. Some swear by it, some swear at it. For future reference, search for "vatrader petcock upgrade" on this forum.

The picture you show is for a very late model KLR. There are two vacuum ports, as one runs the Air Injection System (AIS).
 
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Tom, your 1st paragraph is hilarious , but spot on.

If it had not been for the low mounting of the float bowl vent hose attached to the green nipple on my 1987 KLR650-A1, I might not be here today.

I attempted to cross a swollen river, full of COLD Spring melt water, here in the Rocky Mtns.
The bike kept dying when the water got about half way up the engine cylinder. I was extremely disappointed that I had to pull my bike backwards out of the water to re-start it.
I finally gave up and rode back from where I came.

Later that year I discovered that, had the engine continued to run, I might have been gas cap deep in Swift Water. With No hope and No one else around.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, small update after the weekend :
I rebuild and clean the carb thanks to @Tom Schmitz 's videos. The gas tank has some rust in it but a lot of black hard and crusty goo in it, so i couldn't use it to test the engine. I created a quick funnel thingie to fill the carb bowl with new gasoline. I got a new battery and the electric system seems to hold quite well. After pulling the choke and trying to start it, the life suddenly returned to the engine! With the choke on, it seems to idle somewhere just above 1000prm. I can rev it a bit and it seems to take it quite well. Let it run for about 30 seconds and turn the choke off, but then it just dies every time.

So my questions now are :
- what's the best way to get the black gunk out? Seems to be a lot of debate on that.
- there's a bit of rust in the tank, and the gas that came out if it was light brown in color. How do i know how much rust is too much?
- Can i assume the engine is in running condition after my description above? Or are there more/better tests to run?

The plan now would be, if the engine is determined to be OK, is to start stripping the bike down to the frame so I can repair the rust on it and repaint. I feel that if it's good to run, i should take my time to rebuild a Tengai entirely and not just get it rolling.
 

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If it dies when you take the choke off, then the likely cause is that the idle circuit is not clean. The 'choke' is not really a choke, it is a fuel enricher. It allows more fuel in rather than choking off the air to increase the richness of the idle mixture.

Pain in the butt, I know, but the carb has to come back off and the idle circuit gone over again. Pay special attention to the small holes and passage ways near the butterfly plate. Make doubly sure the idle jet is clear. That jet is so small that it is easily obstructed. If memory serves, it is in the range of .25mm. Make sure a strand of copper wire can pass through.

 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hey Tom,
I did go through each jet with some copper wire and blasted air through every orifice i could find? But i'll follow your advice and take it apart once more tomorrow. It's fun to tinker with, and i already replaced all the rusting screws with allen bolts, so it should come apart easier this time.
 

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If the idle circuit is clear then it should idle fine at a bit over 1K RPM. Not being able to idle is pretty much a classic symptom on a clog in the idle circuit.

I find that a spray cleaner can be useful for being able to make sure that all passageways are clear because you can see it coming out. Some of the drillings in the carb body are difficult to send a wire through.

One of these days I'm going to sit down and make a map of the drillings in the carb body. I may even make a video that focuses on the idle circuit.
 

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Hey Tom,
I did go through each jet with some copper wire and blasted air through every orifice i could find? But i'll follow your advice and take it apart once more tomorrow. It's fun to tinker with, and i already replaced all the rusting screws with allen bolts, so it should come apart easier this time.
Trikke,
Tom mentioned, but did not stress the importance of cleanliness of the 3 or 4 tiny little holes at the bottom edge of the throttle plate.
They all get their fuel from that tiny little pilot jet as well does the adjustable idle mixture screw.
You need to take one copper wire like Tom showed and bent a 90 degree end on it.
With the pilot jet removed, poke the bent wire down thru those tiny holes and then back flush with aerosol carb cleaner and compressed air.
Then turn the idle mixture screw closed and squirt carb cleaner up thru the pilot jet pocket to confirm all holes are flowing full stream.
Re-adjust mixture screw and re-install pilot jet.

When everything is clean, at proper idle speed the idle speed screw will hold the butterfly plate open about 1&1/4 - 1&1/2 holes. (workbench adjust 1&1/2, better to error high)
 

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As to cleaning the varnish and possibly rust out of the fuel tank.
First stop is at the high-pressure car wash to remove as much of the chunky stuff as possible.

Then, a hand full of small nuts and washers, 2 gallons of Original formula "Pine-Sol" and shake, soak, shake, repeat. Save the Pine-Sol in a bucket, rinse & inspect the tank, repeat as needed. You will need a magnet on a stick to retrieve all or most of the nuts & washers.

The red bottles of Gas Tank Heet (Isopropyl alcohol) is an excellent final rinse and dryer.
 

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Hi guys,

just a small update on thuis build. i cleaned the carb entirely again. It seemed to be running fine again on choke but not on idle. I did remember i fully disengaged the throttle screw. So i adjusted until the bike would sit at about 1400-1500 rpm on idle without choke. With choke it would sit around 2500-3000 rpm.

Here's a small video of it running for the first time in a long periode

I was wondering if anyone could hear anything weird with the engine? And was i correct in my thinking with the throttle screw?
 

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... i cleaned the carb entirely again. It seemed to be running fine again on choke but not on idle. I did remember i fully disengaged the throttle screw. So i adjusted until the bike would sit at about 1400-1500 rpm on idle without choke. With choke it would sit around 2500-3000 rpm...
We'll put a positive spin on this: It's clean!

Congrats n reviving the Mighty Tengai!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I've started to dissasemble the entire bike and work my way to the frame. Progress was good until it was halted when trying to get the engine out of the frame. According to the manual it is held in place by a few brackets and a few bigger bolts at the back of the engine. One bolt in particular won't move at all. I've put too much torque on it already and stripped it a pit. Trying to bang it out from the other side doesn't work at all. So i'm looking for engine removal advice. Or advice on how to get that last bolt out, i'm so close!

It's this one giving me a hard time:
monosnap.com/file/eq8FMRSocZWiufOKpxnqiCJTF1QJBu
monosnap.com/file/fuAZs9DGJzh8r4ByHLYANf62QoasAh


(sorry, about the copy-paste urls, can't still post full urls due to post count)
 

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Rub-roh, the dreaded knuckle pivot bolt.

Read the following for some insight.

Why won't that damn pivot bolt come out ? Or, four very important Zerk fittings.

Make sure the back motor mount bolt is loose and try again. You might get lucky.
If not you will need to use a big hammer, a big drift, penetrating oil, and patience.

What needs to happen is that the built up rust needs to be sheared away as you drive the bolt out. Rotating the bolt as you beat on it may help.

Good luck!
 
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