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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Electricity is for electricians and wizards as far as I"m concerned. Black magic. I try my best to leave it alone and hopefully it will leave me alone.

But I had a scare last summer the day before a big trip, my LED brake light started to flicker on and off. Dangerous! Somehow I managed to trace it to an SAE cable that travels from my battery to the handlebars so I can charge my GPS/phone. It has an inline fuse and one of the legs of the fuse had been crushed and was shorting.

The reason it was crushed is that I have WAY TOO MUCH CROWDING ON TOP OF MY BATTERY. I think I have so many inline fuses there that when I removed and replaced the seat it shifted position and as a result got mushed.

I have a new SAE cable with inline fuse. I have Denali D4 auxiliary lights with lots of cables, connectors a fuse and a relay. And Oxford heated grips and its inline fuse! I have most of the wiring for these run along the frame and then tucked up nicely near the horn. However, the inline fuses have to be right next to the battery because the distance from the fuse to the terminal connector is like 2 inches. And as you guys know, there just isn't any room right there on top of the battery.

My project right now is to clean up and protect this abomination of wiring that I have made. It would be great if I could lengthen the wire between the terminal connector and the inline fuse so I could tuck a couple of the fuses where there is some room behind the battery at the wheel-well. Is this a possibility? Any other suggestions?
 

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I have not added anything to the KLR, but on my street bikes, I would put in a small Aux. fuse panel. You run one power wire to the battery. Then you put all your accessories to the fuse panel. Keeps things a lot cleaner. Then you do not have all of the separate inline fuse holders taking up space. You still keep the relays on the high draw items so you do not overload the switches.
 
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I installed a Fuzeblocks FZ-1 Distribution Block. While you can run the power wire to your battery, I chose to run it to the starter relay. This keeps the battery terminal bolts free. Look at the Clymer wiring diagram. I did install one SAE plug to the battery so that I could hook up my inflator easily. The Fuzeblock allows you to choose either switched or non switched set ups for any auxiliary power requirements. I currently (pun intended) have heated grips, 2 powerlet plug-ins and aux lights attached to the Fuzeblock and only one wire running back to the starter relay. I chose a switched set up for all my accessories so that there isn't a power left on when I shut down the bike.
 

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What @Snowmoer and @Merritt64 said. You can go from mild to wild on this. That is, you can use a simple $10 fuse block on up to a power distribution block with resettable breakers and as 'key-on only' or 'always hot' for $100+.

This is what I initially did on my Gen 2: https://www.klrforum.com/2008-klr650-wrenching-mod-questions/14573-adding-fuse-box.html

I have since changed to a Bandit fuse box that I got from Cycle Terminal, ATC/ATO 5 Circuit Bussed Fuse Box

Whatever you do, use high-quality open-barrel crimp terminals of the kind that you'd get from Cycle Terminal. Invest in a decent crimp tool. If you like to solder connections (I don't, neither does any OEM. I used to but now believe it is unnecessary) use only a dab of solder at the end of the wire; don't let it wick up beyond the crimp.

On my BMW I used Eastern Beaver's PC-8 box and was perfectly happy with it.

Other options are the Centech AP1 or 2, Fuzeblock, Denali PowerHub 2, Rowe PDM60, and a host of simple fuse blocks from the likes of Fastronix and Blue Sea.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I installed a Fuzeblocks FZ-1 Distribution Block. While you can run the power wire to your battery, I chose to run it to the starter relay. This keeps the battery terminal bolts free. Look at the Clymer wiring diagram. I did install one SAE plug to the battery so that I could hook up my inflator easily. The Fuzeblock allows you to choose either switched or non switched set ups for any auxiliary power requirements. I currently (pun intended) have heated grips, 2 powerlet plug-ins and aux lights attached to the Fuzeblock and only one wire running back to the starter relay. I chose a switched set up for all my accessories so that there isn't a power left on when I shut down the bike.
Interesting. I was looking at some of those fuse blocks and they look pretty complicated for a layman.

Where do you have the FZ1 on the bike?

And like I said, I know next to nothing about wiring and electricity. Does switched vs non switched mean key on vs key off or actual manual switches for each accessory?
 

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Interesting. I was looking at some of those fuse blocks and they look pretty complicated for a layman.

Where do you have the FZ1 on the bike?

And like I said, I know next to nothing about wiring and electricity. Does switched vs non switched mean key on vs key off or actual manual switches for each accessory?
Actually, I would say that these are designed for laymen. They are very easy to work with. In a nutshell, one power wire in, one ground wire in and then attach your accessories to whatever circuit you choose. It is very easy and the directions are very straightforward.

I installed mine in the left hand fairing of my gen 2. Made a simple blanking plate out of aluminum and attached it to the frame underneath the fairing.

Yes, switched means key on. There aren't any switches on the Fuzeblock. The position that you install your fuse determines whether it's switched or not. Once again, very easy and straightforward when you see it.
 

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The Fuzeblocks FZ1 is the most easy to install IMHO. Especially if you spring for their wiring harness.

I mounted mine above the head light on my Gen2 on an aluminum bracket I fabricated. (I'm a stickler for factory installed looks!)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The FZ1 looks like a good remedy, but I don't know where I'd mount it on a gen 1.
 

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Late to the party, but I'm going to put my FZ-1 over the headlight as well. Seems the most easily accessible and elegant solution. What did you mount your bracket to? Have you discovered any difficulties since your installation?
 

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Late to the party, but I'm going to put my FZ-1 over the headlight as well. Seems the most easily accessible and elegant solution. What did you mount your bracket to? Have you discovered any difficulties since your installation?
Here is a picture of my install. Arrows point to the bracket mount points.

No difficulties at all.

Bracket template also attached.

fz1.jpeg
 

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Wow, nice install. Great location for farkles. Thanks for the template. What did you use for your 12V Trigger wire?
 

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Trigger wire is cooling fan wire under the seat (gen2).

Many use a lighting feed. But, worst case, if I screwed something up and caused a short on my install wiring, I figured I could get home without the cooling fan, vice loss of lighting after dark!

Like I said though, I've had no issues with my install.
 
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