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Any of you have a phobia of cornering either to the right or to the left? I put 500+ miles on the 08 last weekend traveling from Athens to Savannah and back. I found that cornering to the right was no problem, but while cornering to the left, I kept fighting the bike from drifting off the road or getting too close to the center line. I'd have to slow wayyy down for these corners.


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It's normal to be more comfortable turning one way vs. the other; take a riding course and practice......sometimes the biggest danger is in your head. ;-)

Dave
 

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Are you left-handed?

My unscientific observation is that right-handed people corner best to the left and vice-versa.

When I was shopping for Gixxer pipes I needed right-hand ones. Hard to find, as many were badly scraped up from right-side falls.
 

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I recently had a front tire slideout on my Goldwing in a canyon left turn. I have a left turn phobia now, especially on that bike. It definitely made me slow down anything I ride.
 

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Cornering/turning a motorcycle at speeds of 20 mph and above is all in the hands at street legal speeds.

It is accomplished by counter-steering of the front tire so as the tire tread contact patch shifts Under the bike. PUSH the right side handlebar lightly and the bike will go right. Push harder it will steer farther, quicker. The crown/slope of the roadway or tire path may be gripping the LH side of the front tire ever so slightly, so slight RH pressure on the RH handlebar will hold it straight.

May I suggest that you find a deserted roadway and practice zig-zaging down a straight roadway at 30-60 mph with ONLY your Right hand on the throttle & Handlebar, until you feel more 'in-control' of the bike, instead of 'just along for the ride'.
If you had 'cruise control', I would then suggest that you practice with Only your left hand on the handlebar.
,
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Cornering/turning a motorcycle at speeds of 20 mph and above is all in the hands at street legal speeds.



It is accomplished by counter-steering of the front tire so as the tire tread contact patch shifts Under the bike. PUSH the right side handlebar lightly and the bike will go right. Push harder it will steer farther, quicker. The crown/slope of the roadway or tire path may be gripping the LH side of the front tire ever so slightly, so slight RH pressure on the RH handlebar will hold it straight.



May I suggest that you find a deserted roadway and practice zig-zaging down a straight roadway at 30-60 mph with ONLY your Right hand on the throttle & Handlebar, until you feel more 'in-control' of the bike, instead of 'just along for the ride'.

If you had 'cruise control', I would then suggest that you practice with Only your left hand on the handlebar.

,


Great advice. Thanks.


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Take it easy and take it gradually. There is no percentage in rushing things. We've all been where you are at one time or another. Or at least I have been, sometimes just because it was a new and/or unfamiliar bike to me. As others have suggested, you might consider taking a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course, or something similar. Many riders take classes like this after years of riding. The common statement afterwards is that they (and I) wish that we'd done it a long time before we did. Lots of skills and tips that one doesn't always think about that courses like these show you and then provide you with calm and unhurried practice.
 

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Conoring

One of the hardest things I've had to perfect is, turning at low speeds.

There's a trick mentioned in most MC training. It's keeping your eyes looking, out ahead, where you want to go, not down near the front wheel or road directly in front of bike.
Head-up Look ahead where you want to be.

It seems kind of unintuitive, but it's real spooky how well it works. Even at higher speeds it works.
Try it on a curve sometime. Look way up ahead at a point on the curve where you want to be. The car or bike seems to just go where you want it to be in the road way.
Practice on open roadways, or in a large empty parking lot, at first.

When I first started riding, I had the fear of tipping over on entrance ramps. I just couldn't seem to lean over enough to make the turn. This technique made all that go away.
 

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I was going to say the same you may be left handed, or right handed like myself but tend to lean towards being ambidextrous.
 

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Another tip to add to Larry31's great advice from the safety classes, of keeping your head Up and looking Forward to where you want to go instead of where you are.

Tilt your head to keep your Eyes Level with the roadway, instead of seeing things on the slant!
 
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