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2022 KLR650
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have the stock tires on my 2022 KLR650.

I am looking for recommendations on a better set of tires for dirt but also still handle well on the highways/city streets. Maybe something more aggressive than stock but not completely dirt specific.

So far I have heard of:
Dunlop 606
Tusk?
 

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I'm running conti escapes . 70 -30 seems about right but I have too little experience on a motorcycle to be of use in assessing anything about them really . I think I want to get some tires that are a little more dirt oriented without loosing my cornering traction on the narrow twisty paved back roads through the hills around here so I like these tire threads even if they are old hat to the more seasoned riders among us . I'm thinking the 704 shinkos are similar to the conti escapes . Not sure if I want the 804 's though . So far the extent of my dirt riding is on improved FS roads and the contis are good for that near as I can tell with my squidish point of view .
 

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I'll throw in a vote for the lowly Kenda K270 tires. I'll suggest they are true 50/50 tires. Their 'square' profile may resist sudden direction changes on asphalt, but they will grip asphalt or dirt/gravel to Beyond most riders abilities or bravery.
And very high mileage for the price tag.

Stay with standard widths. The KLR rims are nearly too Narrow as is.
 
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KLR 2014 Gen 2
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Using Shinko 804/805 (front & rear have different numbers, weird but true) and so far so good

My KLR never had a wobble but I felt some on my bike at the beginning, originally I thought , new tires are bound to some weirdness until rubber breaks in, but at highway speeds beyond 75 mph that wobble kept appearing.

Soon I realized my front tire was loosing air faster than I was used with my previous tube (I changed tubes when I did the tires) which I learnt to read , it took about three weeks to go from 30 to 20 on my old set up, but this one was different.

Found out the wobble was due to low pressure, checked the tire pressure thinking I should have been at around 28, but at 22 , the front Shinko had a shake riding beyond 75mph

Jacked up the pressure to 33 all around, and it ran like a charm

On pavement I ride at 33 psi on these Shinkos and no wobble ever again.

Great all around tires, I think these are considered 50/50.

Here photos of wheels/tires off bike, and "on" bike 👍
Tire Wheel Tread Automotive tire Synthetic rubber
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Locking hubs Tread
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Fuel tank
 

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Tires, like all things dual sport, are compromises and what's "best" for one rider isn't the case for everyone. I set up my KLR's to perform well offroad and find they are more than adequate on the pavement as well......or, as I like to say: I seldom get stuck on pavement! That said, I don't do a ton of long distance highway or high speed asphalt riding; hence I don't care about wear or noise as much as traction. I use the popular dual sport offroad combo of the Dunlop D606 rear and Pirelli MT21 front.....but you may be better served with a slightly more pavement oriented choice. But I have a couple thoughts;

- as Paul said; stick with the stock sizes or as close as you can; the stock rims are borderline too narrow as it is and you are compromising functionality going with anything wider......which people often do for "looks" (to their detriment).

- As Paul will also say; run 2 psi higher in the smaller front tire. It is an urban myth that you need more pressure in the rear unless you are running extremely heavy or 2 up and even the Manual has no more pressure in the rear than the front unless running very heavy.

- knobbies or tire pressures will not cause wobble........they may exacerbate a pre-existing condition but they are not the cause.

- use good tubes; I use real rubber or a blend and stick with good brands like Bridgestone, Michelin, IRC, etc. Synthetic tubes tend to rip.....which is bad! Another urban myth is that HD tubes heat up on the highway....they don't....or more accurately, not enough to make any difference.

2 cents,
Dave
 

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2022 KLR650
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42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I'm looking to do the same and was told this is a good replacement to stock tires. They are 80/20 tires
Michelin Anakee Adventure Tires
I looked these up, nice tires!
I think some are going with a slightly wider front also. Here is what they are putting on from factory on 2022s. Not bad tires..

Front



rear
 

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Anyone tried Shinko 700s?

Just bought a set but haven’t mounted them yet. Do a forum search for more info on them.
 

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If money isn’t an object check out the Motoz line of tires. They are pricey but they also last. Here is an excellent review.

 

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I have used the Shinko 700's. They are good on pavement as well as on the dirt/gravel roads.
I currently have a 700 on the front and a 705 on the back. The 705's seem to last a little longer than the 700 on the rear, but a little less traction in the real loose stuff than the 700.
I don't think the 705's would be good in mud, but that is just speculation as I hate mud and try not to ride in it.
 

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Here is what they are putting on from factory on 2022s. Not bad tires..
Kawasaki has used the Dunlop K750 tires on the KLR650's since 1987!

The older Made in Japan Dunlop K750's lasted a bit longer than the newer made in Thailand K750's.
 

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KLR 2014 Gen 2
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218 Posts
Tire pressures do cause wobble if too low. I corroborated that fact, my KLR never had a wobble and never did again after I corrected air pressure.

Off course there could be other reasons, but in the case of my KLR it was 100% corroborated

I do ride off road as much as highway speeds and I go 90 on open roads, Highway, so I need good tire pressure for those tracks.

If I am going away to an off road location to find no pavement but mud, sand, water and mountains , I will need get on highways to get there, and that is not like driving around the block, it is a long ride which I enjoy.

The only time I experienced a wobble that was not caused by tire pressure was after installing new set of tires, and at speeds over 75 mph, the wobble appeared, and the reason was not the tire pressure as ascertained, but the tires being new and in need of mileage to cure / break in properly. Pressure was throughly checked.

That fact was corroborated because after a couple hundred miles on same pressure at highway speeds over 75 the wobble disappeared, all other variables same, the only variable that changed was the tire wear / break in factor

The case of the Shinko 804 (front) was a case of this tire not liking pressures bellow 28 psi.

Each tire is different and each combination of tire , wheel and pressure will be a different chapter.
 

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Hi, Jaimesix; I wasn't trying to pick on your comment but I believe (and still do) that even though increasing tire pressure may have "closed the path of least resistance" in your case that it was not the root cause of the instability. I use knobbies at 22-24psi front and 20-22 rear and have taken corners on the highway at 75-80mph with one hand on the bars without a hint of wobble.

My "wobble post";

Way too many people think that addressing the symptoms by dealing with handguards, fenders, fork braces, etc. are the answer rather than dealing with the real issue which is related to suspension setup and loading. I'm not convinced that the KLR is any more susceptible to instability than any other bike with long travel, lightly damped suspension and the Owner's have a propensity for severe and uneven loading.

There are some problems that need to be checked;

- bad/lose head bearings

- condition of wheel bearings and suspension bushings

- wheel and tire condition and appropriate tire pressures.

.....beyond that, It's settings;

- proper sag settings and adequate damping

- proper bike loading

- avoiding inappropriately un-aerodynamic loads



addressing the symptoms rather than the cause can help but IMO shouldn't be done until all the aforementioned items are checked and corrected if necessary. Nonetheless these can help stability;

- fork brace

- smaller fender or lowered fender (I use a polisport as I hate both the supermoto and low mounted fenders)

- consider tank bags instead of putting everything in huge panniers which affects both weight loading and aerodynamics.



My 2001 had some high speed issues that went away as soon as the sag was set properly....and after my Cogent suspension was installed, both my KLR's have been rock steady.....even with full knobbies and low tire pressures (20 - 22PSI). Lastly, as others have mentioned, the rider also plays a part; keep a relaxed light grip on the bars and don't tighten up. Changing your position (move forward/lean forward) can help too.



2 cents,

Dave
 

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2002 KLR650
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Have been running the 705s as well and they are great if you mostly commute and ride access roads on the weekends. And without airing down I can comfortably run 45 mph on gravel. No, they don’t like mud but if you can keep your balance and keep your foot off the back brake you can get through minimal mud just fine, but it is sketchy.

With proper air pressure I run what Paul says, 32-34 front 30-32 rear, and they wear slowly and hold amazing in wet weather on tar. Have never had it try to wash out at all.

I think even experienced riders forget that tires need to break in for at least 100 miles before they really achieve maximum grip, so always keep that in mind once you switch.
 

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I love the Shinko 705s as well. I've had them on my bike for probably 5000 miles and just replaced them with another set of 705s. I've done a lot of commuting and highway riding. They seemed to handle way more smoothly than the stock tires on roads. I've taken them down quite a few dirt roads and they handle that really well. But I haven't done any really intense trail riding with these. They're also pretty affordable, which is a bonus. I bought the tubeless tires for my bike and just put the tubes in them. It works well for me but I was a little paranoid when purchasing them the first time.

I thought these youtube video did a nice comparison between the different off road tires and explaining the tread patterns:
A little longer but also had some good info.
 
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