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Line6 distortion,

- 1) fatter than I'd like but not too bad - about 200lbs sans gear. I've been injured and haven't worked out for several months - hoping to get back to it and get back to my 185lb riding weight by spring.
- 2) No, I don't carry any heavy bags or luggage; no panniers or top boxes - minor stuff in my tank vest
- 3) Nope; my gal refuses to get on the back......a strong sense of self-preservation prevents me from disclosing her exact weight but I can say that she's not much more than half my weight.
- 4) I like my steak rare to med. rare.

daave,

I run 22-24 front and 20-22 rear for my "offroad centric" usage. I could see dropping down a bit in sand and adding a bit for a long highway jaunt (+/- a few PSI) but since I'm pretty lazy, I keep the pressures at those numbers. Remember that the factory recommendation is 21psi front AND rear unless you are loaded heavy and/or are running 2 up....which I'm not (see above!) and there is zero reason to run more pressure in the larger rear tire unless you are. Lastly, I try to stay above 18PSI due to the lack of rimlocks and to try to avoid pinch flats on the 400lb dual sport.

cheers,

Dave
 

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And she knows how to ride her own dirt bike, fast!

In the interest of full disclosure, I taught my EX wife how to ride and she had a successful amature offroad racing "career". Pic is of the current wife (married 6 years now); despite a short stint as the passenger on my HD Electraglide on a 3,000 mile tour through California and Nevada, the current Mrs. has no desire to ride.....luckily she has other redeeming qualities. :)

Dave
 

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Big Ooops on my part, sorry. I'll try to remember the distinction between past & present. :)
 

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Lol....

You guys crack me up. I'm a little rounder than Dave so I think I'll keep the rear tire at around 28 but I too have left my front tire psi at 22ish.
 

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I think I'll keep the rear tire at around 28 but I too have left my front tire psi at 22ish.
You are NOT understanding Dave P's posting correctly.
Keep your front tire 2 psi HIGHER than what you chose to run in the fatter rear tire! The skinny front tire NEEDS more PSI than the wider rear tire due to Less square inches of contact patch! Pounds PER Square Inch.
When pointing downhill and properly braking (80% front/20% rear) your front tire is carrying 80% of the total load of the bike & payload.
Your front tire needs more pressure!
 
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Lol....

You guys crack me up. I'm a little rounder than Dave so I think I'll keep the rear tire at around 28 but I too have left my front tire psi at 22ish.
You'd have to be pretty round; Kawi recommends 28PSI for the rear at a 415 lb load IIRC. Funny thing is that Kawi recommends 21psi below 215 lbs and 28psi at 216- 415 lbs.......logic suggests that there should be a sliding scale though, as Paul has said, I always run more in the front particularly due to my "lighter loaded" condition.

2 cents,

Dave
 

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You are NOT understanding Dave P's posting correctly.
Keep your front tire 2 psi HIGHER than what you chose to run in the fatter rear tire! The skinny front tire NEEDS more PSI than the wider rear tire due to Less square inches of contact patch! Pounds PER Square Inch.
When pointing downhill and properly braking (80% front/20% rear) your front tire is carrying 80% of the total load of the bike & payload.
Your front tire needs more pressure!
Ah yes I get it now. Since I'm not 415 pounds I should lower the rear to somewhere closer to 21 then 2+ for the front wherever it lands.

The manual says 215 pounds or less should be 21psi in the rear. 215-401 pounds should be 36.

Front tire is 21psi up to 401 pounds.

Where are you guys getting your numbers?
 

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Front tire is 21psi up to 401 pounds.

Where are you guys getting your numbers?
For mostly highway usage, I'll suggest a minimum of 32 Front / 30 Rear.

Lower front tire pressure accelerates wear/cupping. Makes for sluggish response to steering inputs on highway and can sometimes initiate wobbles. And I weigh about 185 with all gear on.
I rarely air down, because I hate to have to air Back UP.

About 50+ years of riding experience.
 

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This is from my 22’ manual. Not much in the way of details. 21psi for 215 lb or less, or 36psi for 216 lb or more?
Is “load” anything above dry curb weight? Or rider and gear? I’d imagine just rider and gear.
The dealer set mine to 21 front and 36 rear. I’ll definitely be trying the rear at 21 off road since I’m sure 15 pounds less will make a serious difference.

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Well I guess one gleans slightly more functionality out of a Tire psi vs loaded weight thread than they do an oil thread.

but sorry, I blacked out after that picture of the blond. line6
 

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Ah yes I get it now. Since I'm not 415 pounds I should lower the rear to somewhere closer to 21 then 2+ for the front wherever it lands.

The manual says 215 pounds or less should be 21psi in the rear. 215-401 pounds should be 36.

Front tire is 21psi up to 401 pounds.

Where are you guys getting your numbers?

My 2000 and 2001 manuals have 28psi instead of 36 but you've got the jist of it now. Basically I'm with Paul; more in the front. As far as the rear goes, Kawi's numbers fail the logic test - going by their recommendations you'd run 21psi rear at 215 lbs and 36psi rear at 216 lbs......doesn't make any sense. If you really wanted to go with those numbers with any sort of logical application, you'd need to use a sliding scale adding .08 psi per lb for every lb over 215

Dave
 

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as the horse is still quivering. - Air pressure seems like basic Y= mx +b. I would state that I always felt better getting by with a dual sport DOT knobbie on the highway that trying to get by with a highway tire off road. And regarding air pressure - psi - Yes, absolutely need it. Having learned when I was 6, how to true my bike's wheels on my cool Coast King 3 speed with 20in tires (knobbie in back) I put appropriate air in them. Right up there with the zen torque method, or famous torque method of Dr Gutenteit. line6
 

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as the horse is still quivering. - Air pressure seems like basic Y= mx +b. I would state that I always felt better getting by with a dual sport DOT knobbie on the highway that trying to get by with a highway tire off road.
....I think I saw the horse twitch! (well that and I get some sort of perverse pleasure knowing that Tom is sitting in the "shed of horrors" shaking his head at us!) ......but I agree wholeheartedly; as I put it: I seldom get stuck on pavement!

I chose my tires based on the WORST conditions I expect to encounter. ....and other than replacing them more often, I see little downside to running knobbies on pavement - I've managed some pretty vigorous manouvers without issue.

Dave
 

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as the horse is still quivering. - Air pressure seems like basic Y= mx +b. I would state that I always felt better getting by with a dual sport DOT knobbie on the highway that trying to get by with a highway tire off road. And regarding air pressure - psi - Yes, absolutely need it. Having learned when I was 6, how to true my bike's wheels on my cool Coast King 3 speed with 20in tires (knobbie in back) I put appropriate air in them. Right up there with the zen torque method, or famous torque method of Dr Gutenteit. line6
I'm starting to feel that way as well. Trackmaster 2 and a perelli MT32 do not break the bank, and they are amazing on gravel and off road.

My plan is to fully load the bike and ride it that way for the next couple months and see what works for psi. Since I'm not driving over 60 I doubt I'll end up over 25 for both.
 

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Sorry to necro this thread but. Heh. My 22 klr from the day i road it home. It now has 339 miles on it, it has had a bad wobble up front. I took it back to the dealer they looked it over. Could not find any bearings lose or bushings loose. I feel like the rim is off balance just my instinct. I did bring it home after the check over and uped my pressure from 22lbs to 33lbs and the wobble went away. I don't know i am toying with replaceing or resetting the tube. Its stock tube. My guess indo off brand. The wobble feels like water in the tube kind of wobble.
I watch masonadv on youtube he says he runs his tires norml at 35 rear do to weight and 25 upfront. The book says 22lbs is there anything to reason why more lbs would be bad other then maybe ware? Any one have a suggestion?
 
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