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Did you READ the entire thread or not?
How much do you weigh & do you have gear/luggage on the rear?

As a base-line, I suggest the skinny front tire should ALWAYS have 2 psi more than the fatter rear tire.
My base suggestion normally is to put 32 psi Front & 30 psi Rear and ride those tires til the grooves in the rear center nearly disappear.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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Sorry to necro this thread but. Heh. My 22 klr from the day i road it home. It now has 339 miles on it, it has had a bad wobble up front. I took it back to the dealer they looked it over. Could not find any bearings lose or bushings loose. I feel like the rim is off balance just my instinct. I did bring it home after the check over and uped my pressure from 22lbs to 33lbs and the wobble went away. I don't know i am toying with replaceing or resetting the tube. Its stock tube. My guess indo off brand. The wobble feels like water in the tube kind of wobble.
I watch masonadv on youtube he says he runs his tires norml at 35 rear do to weight and 25 upfront. The book says 22lbs is there anything to reason why more lbs would be bad other then maybe ware? Any one have a suggestion?
Perhaps your bead wasn't seated properly until you aired up to 33PSI.......people have said in the past that higher tire pressures helped a wobble problem, but IMO it's more likely that the extra pressure simply helped mask an underlying condition. I run my 22-24psi front up to 80mph, around corners....with one hand on the bars...all without issue. Downsides to more pressure; harsher ride, reduced contact patch, early tire wear.....

If it was my bike, I'd make sure the suspension and sag is set properly and if it feels better at 30 - 33 psi, then keep it there until you change tires. Also check your rim for runout and make sure your spokes are tight

Dave
 

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Sorry to necro this thread but. Heh. My 22 klr from the day i road it home. It now has 339 miles on it, it has had a bad wobble up front. I took it back to the dealer they looked it over. Could not find any bearings lose or bushings loose. I feel like the rim is off balance just my instinct. I did bring it home after the check over and uped my pressure from 22lbs to 33lbs and the wobble went away. I don't know i am toying with replaceing or resetting the tube. Its stock tube. My guess indo off brand. The wobble feels like water in the tube kind of wobble.
I watch masonadv on youtube he says he runs his tires norml at 35 rear do to weight and 25 upfront. The book says 22lbs is there anything to reason why more lbs would be bad other then maybe ware? Any one have a suggestion?
My front rim has a weight, from being balanced. Maybe you can have it balanced. Sounds like your dealer isn’t very good if they didn’t check that.
I’ve felt a tiny wobble a couple times, but only then. I have 600 kms on mine, so perhaps the road had something to do with it. Or wind. I’ve read that people swap out the front fender because it can effect the front tire in wind.
I’ve read that someone also said increasing air pressure eliminated a wobble. Yet that has to be a remedy to an issue that should be addressed. Maybe the tire is defective?
 

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Did you READ the entire thread or not?
How much do you weigh & do you have gear/luggage on the rear?

As a base-line, I suggest the skinny front tire should ALWAYS have 2 psi more than the fatter rear tire.
My base suggestion normally is to put 32 psi Front & 30 psi Rear and ride those tires til the grooves in the rear center nearly disappear.

Welcome to the forum.
I’m curious as to your suggestion, and how it is quite contrary to the manufacturers recommendation. I’m not doubting your knowledge and experience, honestly. Yet I’m weary of adding 50% more pressure to the front than Kawasaki reccomends. Perhaps Kawasaki’s reccomended pressure specifically applies to stock tires, and tires that are vastly different have different dynamics.
Again, I mean no disrespect, I’m just interested in the ‘science’ of it. I did read your reasoning for your recommendation, but I don’t know enough to really make sense of it tbh.
Obviously I’m the type to trust ‘the book’ as gospel, but I also know enough that the book isn’t always best.
I guess you’ve already explained your reasoning but maybe I’m still missing part of the puzzle. There must be a down side to the increase to front pressure no?
 

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I’m curious as to your suggestion, and how it is quite contrary to the manufacturers recommendation.
The KLR series of bikes was engineered, designed & first produced primarily for the USA market place in the early to mid 1980's. During the 55 mph national speed limit!
Have you read of very many owners whine & whimper about handlebar wobbles, head-shake or tail-wag of KLR's at 60mph or under?

Many years ago one of the 'guest techs' in a motorcycle magazine article wrote that proper tire pressure for continuous On-Highway usage had best be NOT LESS than 8 psi below Maximum psi listed on the sidewall of the tire.
That sage advise has served me well for 50+ years of riding, 45+ years as a professional motorcycle mechanic & 26+ years of co-ownership of the previously, "Oldest Kawasaki Dealership in the USA". Franchise relinquished in July 2016.

The skinnier front tires need more air pressure because of the effects of braking weight transference. especially during down-grades, where 80-90% of the bike, rider(s) and cargo mass can be on that skinny tire!
 

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I’m curious as to your suggestion, and how it is quite contrary to the manufacturers recommendation. I’m not doubting your knowledge and experience, honestly. Yet I’m weary of adding 50% more pressure to the front than Kawasaki reccomends. Perhaps Kawasaki’s reccomended pressure specifically applies to stock tires, and tires that are vastly different have different dynamics.
Again, I mean no disrespect, I’m just interested in the ‘science’ of it. I did read your reasoning for your recommendation, but I don’t know enough to really make sense of it tbh.
Obviously I’m the type to trust ‘the book’ as gospel, but I also know enough that the book isn’t always best.
I guess you’ve already explained your reasoning but maybe I’m still missing part of the puzzle. There must be a down side to the increase to front pressure no?
Paul runs more pressure than I do....mainly because our usage is different and offroad, lower pressures give you a welcome traction increase vs. higher pressures. Since all dual sports are compromises and the KLR is no exception, the factory recommendation of 21 front AND rear is also a compromise - slightly lower pressures benefit offroad (though I stay above 18 or so due to the lack of rimlocks and to help avoid pinch flats) and slightly higher pressures benefit highway use. Regardless of our differences, I absolutely agree with Paul that the front tire benefits from a slight increase over the rear. I raced offroad for 30+ years and myself and everyone else I know (including several ISDE medalists) ran a couple more PSI in the front......the front takes more punishment from hits and the rear benefits more from a couple PSI less for traction. Since I'm lazy and don't like to air up and down and since my usage is mixed with a bias to dirt, I run my 22-24 front and 20-22 rear.....which is almost dead on Kawi's "middle of the road" recommendations. If I was to plan a long pavement trip, I'd add a few PSI to both ends.

2 cents,
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
I can't remember if anyone mentioned the MotoZ's. These are sick! Anyone tried them?

 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
So our 2022 KLRs have a 130/80/17 back tire and a 90/90/21 front. I am thinking of sticking with the same rear tire size but the Motoz Desert HT in front only comes in a 90/100/21. Which actually should be better when airing down. ANy objections, speak now..
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
I ended up scaling back one level and getting the Motoz Tractionator Rallz tires! Looking forward to getting these mounted!
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
I ended up scaling back one level and getting the Motoz Tractionator Rallz tires! Looking forward to getting these mounted!
And on the tire pressure question. KB at Chaparral says run these at 30psi for road/fire roads, trail riding down to 18psi.
 

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Tires, like all things dual sport, are compromises and what's "best" for one rider isn't the case for everyone. I set up my KLR's to perform well offroad and find they are more than adequate on the pavement as well......or, as I like to say: I seldom get stuck on pavement! That said, I don't do a ton of long distance highway or high speed asphalt riding; hence I don't care about wear or noise as much as traction. I use the popular dual sport offroad combo of the Dunlop D606 rear and Pirelli MT21 front.....but you may be better served with a slightly more pavement oriented choice. But I have a couple thoughts;

- as Paul said; stick with the stock sizes or as close as you can; the stock rims are borderline too narrow as it is and you are compromising functionality going with anything wider......which people often do for "looks" (to their detriment).

- As Paul will also say; run 2 psi higher in the smaller front tire. It is an urban myth that you need more pressure in the rear unless you are running extremely heavy or 2 up and even the Manual has no more pressure in the rear than the front unless running very heavy.

- knobbies or tire pressures will not cause wobble........they may exacerbate a pre-existing condition but they are not the cause.

- use good tubes; I use real rubber or a blend and stick with good brands like Bridgestone, Michelin, IRC, etc. Synthetic tubes tend to rip.....which is bad! Another urban myth is that HD tubes heat up on the highway....they don't....or more accurately, not enough to make any difference.

2 cents,
Dave
Tires, like all things dual sport, are compromises and what's "best" for one rider isn't the case for everyone. I set up my KLR's to perform well offroad and find they are more than adequate on the pavement as well......or, as I like to say: I seldom get stuck on pavement! That said, I don't do a ton of long distance highway or high speed asphalt riding; hence I don't care about wear or noise as much as traction. I use the popular dual sport offroad combo of the Dunlop D606 rear and Pirelli MT21 front.....but you may be better served with a slightly more pavement oriented choice. But I have a couple thoughts;

- as Paul said; stick with the stock sizes or as close as you can; the stock rims are borderline too narrow as it is and you are compromising functionality going with anything wider......which people often do for "looks" (to their detriment).

- As Paul will also say; run 2 psi higher in the smaller front tire. It is an urban myth that you need more pressure in the rear unless you are running extremely heavy or 2 up and even the Manual has no more pressure in the rear than the front unless running very heavy.

- knobbies or tire pressures will not cause wobble........they may exacerbate a pre-existing condition but they are not the cause.

- use good tubes; I use real rubber or a blend and stick with good brands like Bridgestone, Michelin, IRC, etc. Synthetic tubes tend to rip.....which is bad! Another urban myth is that HD tubes heat up on the highway....they don't....or more accurately, not enough to make any difference.

2 cents,
Dave
Hi Dave, was the d606 a 130/90 size? I’m looking at putting one on my 22 Adventure but was told there could be an issue with the wider tyre rubbing on the swing arm when the chain is new. Did you find this to be an issue? No 130/80 21 available in the d606’s I believe.
Thanks Phil.
 

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Hi Dave, was the d606 a 130/90 size? I’m looking at putting one on my 22 Adventure but was told there could be an issue with the wider tyre rubbing on the swing arm when the chain is new. Did you find this to be an issue? No 130/80 21 available in the d606’s I believe.
Thanks Phil.
Correct and I've had no problem with the 130/90's though the 2022 has a different swingarm.......I doubt there'd be an issue though. The 130/90 isn't wider, just taller (by 13mm) which could rub on the inner web if the wheel is adjusted all the way forward.

Dave
 

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No 130/80 21 available in the d606’s I believe.
Thanks Phil.
Of course there isn't. :) I think an Edit is in order.

Dave also removes his upper/inner plastic mud guard for the chain.
If you which to ensure clearance at the front & the LH mud guard, consider using a knobby tire sized for the Suzuki DR650. 120/90-17 / 4.60-17
Maybe look at the Rear MT-21 Pirelli or the fairly new D605 Dunlop.
 
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Had the D606’s fitted today. 130/90 on the rear, no clearance issues. Also just booked on the Mototrekkin Aug trip to the tip of Cape York, have to have something to look forward too.
 

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So far I am loving the shinko 705’s. I commute 45mi of highway daily and ride 100+ mi of gravel/dirt on the weekends.
Tires, like all things dual sport, are compromises and what's "best" for one rider isn't the case for everyone. I set up my KLR's to perform well offroad and find they are more than adequate on the pavement as well......or, as I like to say: I seldom get stuck on pavement! That said, I don't do a ton of long distance highway or high speed asphalt riding; hence I don't care about wear or noise as much as traction. I use the popular dual sport offroad combo of the Dunlop D606 rear and Pirelli MT21 front.....but you may be better served with a slightly more pavement oriented choice. But I have a couple thoughts;

- as Paul said; stick with the stock sizes or as close as you can; the stock rims are borderline too narrow as it is and you are compromising functionality going with anything wider......which people often do for "looks" (to their detriment).

- As Paul will also say; run 2 psi higher in the smaller front tire. It is an urban myth that you need more pressure in the rear unless you are running extremely heavy or 2 up and even the Manual has no more pressure in the rear than the front unless running very heavy.

- knobbies or tire pressures will not cause wobble........they may exacerbate a pre-existing condition but they are not the cause.

- use good tubes; I use real rubber or a blend and stick with good brands like Bridgestone, Michelin, IRC, etc. Synthetic tubes tend to rip.....which is bad! Another urban myth is that HD tubes heat up on the highway....they don't....or more accurately, not enough to make any difference.

2 cents,
Dave
I beg to differ regarding tire pressure. Low tire pressures will cause a wobble, at least it did in my experience, I had a rear tire that went soft, so I pumped it up, checking the valve stem. Rode it about ten miles, checked it again and all was good. Relaxed a bit and about twenty miles later I "thought" I felt a wobble, but I had checked the tire and it had been fine. So, I figured I was paranoid and ignored it. Five miles later I was in the ditch. Scraped knee was the only injury as I was wearing all the gear except riding pants. Jus sayin....
 
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