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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

Testing a higher quality video


T
 

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Brilliant. Thanks for putting this up. And thanks for the shout out. ;)

PS - God, I was nervous for your toes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Zombies?

Oh, no, wait.

German shepards.

T
 

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Great tech article Tom !!! One suggestion however.

Speed Bleeders
http://www.speedbleeder.com/

These work great as long as there is little or no air in the system. I got them along with stainless steel braided lines when I first got my KLR. They have to have some pressure to work properly. 7 bucks or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
flash-

Good tip, those speed bleeders.

Thanks,

T
 

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flash-

Good tip, those speed bleeders.

Thanks,

T
I bring this up only because my wife is the only one allowed to "pull my lever".

When I asked her to assist me during the brake line replacement and subsequent bleeding ordeal it put a serious strain on our marriage. I love her but she just could not grasp the mechanics you have so graciously put into a video tutorial and I did wind up doing it just the way you described.

Maybe I should do a testimonial about how speed bleeders saved my marriage.
 

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I wasn't sure what the reason to replace brake fluid is, so I looked into it.

According to these folks, water contamination can result in a reduction of the boiling point by about a hundred degrees of your brake fluid in 3 years.
 

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Hi Tom
Followed your instructions replaced all brake pads and bled the system. Now my rear brake however was not bleeding easily there was basically very little pumping action. I wonder whether you have some advise on servicing the Nissin rear brake master cylinder? And also how to proper adjust the brake master cylinder? - Great video.... I rely on this stuff
 

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Discussion Starter #14
my1stklr-

The simple and quick thing to check is that you had the nipple cracked open enough. Check to see if there is something blocking the nipple passages. I think you should check these things first because it seems odd to have such problems on a two year old bike.

Do the brakes work? Does it take normal pedal force to lock up the rear wheel? Do you get good braking action when braking only with the rear?

If you remove the brake pads, can you fairly easily press the brake pedal down with your hand and see the pistons come out, and do they come out evenly?

If the answers to those questions are "No", then it could be that the brake fluid had absorbed some water and the brake caliper got some corrosion in it.

The solution to that is to remove the pads, press hard on the brake pedal to get the pistons to come out as far as they will, then remove the caliper, disconnecting it from the brake line.

Before going further, check the master cylinder. You should find it is very easy to to move with the brake lever.

On the bench, remove the pistons. Carefully remove the packings (43049 and 43049A in this diagram)

Now look for corrosion, gunk, and debris inside the cylinder and on the outside of the piston. Try to remove corrosion and gunk with chemicals (brake cleaner or some other solvent). Using 800 grit wet/dry sandpaper and oil, gently remove any stubborn corrosion. Clean everything very well.

Examine the packings. If they are undamaged and flexible and not covered with crap you can re-use them. If not, replace them; a set will be less than $25.

Reassemble the caliper, using some new brake fluid as an assembly lube.

Going back to the master cylinder, if it is sticky or won't move, you'll have to disassemble it and fix it like you did on the calipers. Hopefully it's all in good shape though, because its parts are rather expensive.

Find some way to blow air through the hose. Not easy because of the banjo fittings, but you want to be sure there's nothing in it that would be blocking it.

It sounds complicated, but it's really a fairly easy job and shouldn't take more than an hour or so.

If you have too much pedal free play you can adjust the turnbuckle that is on the bottom of the master cylinder to get it where you want it. It's 43010 in this diagram. After adjusting free play make sure the brake light is not on with the pedal in the normal position and make sure the brake light does come on when the pedal is depressed.

Let me know how it goes!

Tom
 

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Great Tom, appreciate your suggestions. I will work on it tonight (missing the Tennis...). The breaking atm is horrible, rear wheel does not lock up at all. So I will go by your check list. I really appreciate your fast reply.
 

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I also have seen a video where they sucked the fluid out of the reservoir and then did your follow-on steps. It seemed to go faster. Does this put air in the lines if you dont pump it while it's empty??
 

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As long as you don't uncover the port in the bottom of the reservoir, no it won't. If you do uncover the port, then it might.

In the video I didn't mention removing other than by stroking the master cylinder because I believe that forcing the old fluid out helps remove any air that might already be trapped in the fluid or in the lines.

Tom
 
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