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2008 Kawasaki KLR 650
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all - quick and hopefully easy question - finally figured out why my brakes were dragging, making for a hot and quick wearing rotor; due to being not ridden for 2 years (covid psychosis again!) the "slider pins" were completely seized. And the tapered nut that holds that assembly down - has taken 3 days of soaking in ATF and acetone to free them up. As often is the case, one thing leads to another - I notice on one of the callipers the rubber seals in the piston bores are totally sad looking. This is the rear calliper. I have a kit for the front - my question is - are the seals the same and compatible, front to rear? Thanks in advance for your help. BTW - I learned that copper grease should not be used on alloy motorcycle brakes as galvanic action accelerates corrosion and consequent seizing.
 

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'08 KLR
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Front and rear have different sized pistons/bores. You'll need a different kit. And yes, no need to get tricky, you're not dealing with extreme heat - a small dab of waterproof grease such as Lucas Red 'N' Tacky is all you need on most moving/sliding parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Front and rear have different sized pistons/bores. You'll need a different kit. And yes, no need to get tricky, you're not dealing with extreme heat - a small dab of waterproof grease such as Lucas Red 'N' Tacky is all you need on most moving/sliding parts.
Thanks! I will figure out how to get a rebuild kit sent to here in the Philippines. I think I will just put it back together and see how it goes in the meanwhile.
 

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yikes, good to know
It's conductive due to the copper particles, so it's like putting water in there that doesn't dry out. Any time you have two dissimilar metals, you want them either dry or protected by a non-conductive lubricant. Any compound or substance that facilitates the flow of electrons basically creates a weak battery. As electrons flow from one metal to the other, they leave ions behind with a positive charge. Oxygen, which mostly exists as O2, has a charge of -2, meaning it has electrons to give up, so they form a partnership and - Voila! - corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's conductive due to the copper particles, so it's like putting water in there that doesn't dry out. Any time you have two dissimilar metals, you want them either dry or protected by a non-conductive lubricant. Any compound or substance that facilitates the flow of electrons basically creates a weak battery. As electrons flow from one metal to the other, they leave ions behind with a positive charge. Oxygen, which mostly exists as O2, has a charge of -2, meaning it has electrons to give up, so they form a partnership and - Voila! - corrosion.
That is a brilliant explanation! Yep - dissimilar metals. I put copper grease on the slider pins and was then stuck unable to get home for 22 months. In that time the tropical heat, the stationary state of the bike and the copper grease did its magic and I am on day 5 of trying to un-seize the pins - got one to go and after hitting it with a 20 oz estwing I just got it to move about an inch...
 

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Timlang60. That's interesting. I've thought about whether antisieze can cause galvanic corrosion, but the silver Permatex stuff that I use hasn't seemed to cause that problem, so I haven't worried about it. Maybe the copper stuff is more conductive and conducive? Maybe the copper adds to the charge difference?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Timlang60. That's interesting. I've thought about whether antisieze can cause galvanic corrosion, but the silver Permatex stuff that I use hasn't seemed to cause that problem, so I haven't worried about it. Maybe the copper stuff is more conductive and conducive? Maybe the copper adds to the charge difference?
If you look at the ingredients of the Permatex product it is a mix of aluminium, copper and graphite. It is a better option for alloy parts IMHO.
 

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If you look at the ingredients of the Permatex product it is a mix of aluminium, copper and graphite. It is a better option for alloy parts IMHO.
Perhaps having two types of metal particles within the Permatex antiseize grease allows limits the charge transfers to those metals rather than the structures the compound separates? (Pure speculation based on just enough knowledge to posit dangerously misinformed theories.)
 

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I'll suggest using molybdenum.

That is if you cannot find the appropriate hightemp silicone brake parts grease.

I practice what I preach. Best wishes
 

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high temp silicone brake grease or for you speed racers the high temp ceramic silicone brake grease is readily available at most any auto parts store.

the key is to do it more frequently than just when you change the pads. those brake components are exposed to the worst environments on a regular basis. it only takes a few minutes and can quite often be done without even removing the caliper. just pull one pin at a time, clean , grease and reinstall.
 

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high temp silicone brake grease or for you speed racers the high temp ceramic silicone brake grease is readily available at most any auto parts store.

the key is to do it more frequently than just when you change the pads. those brake components are exposed to the worst environments on a regular basis. it only takes a few minutes and can quite often be done without even removing the caliper. just pull one pin at a time, clean , grease and reinstall.
The pins that need greasing are attached to the sliding plate and the caliper and pads must be removed to pull the plate out of the caliper so the pins can be greased.
 

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the pins are often threaded through from the front / outside of the caliper (Allen head) and just pass through those components but not attached to. it's been a few years since I had a klr but though I remembered the klr being the same.
 

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2008 Kawasaki KLR 650
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
the pins are often threaded through from the front / outside of the caliper (Allen head) and just pass through those components but not attached to. it's been a few years since I had a klr but though I remembered the klr being the same.
Yeah - they can also get stuck - but that is not the pins that got stuck - I am referring to the two pins that have rubber grommets (to retain the grease) that allow the brake assembly to "float" But you are absolutely spot on correct - these components need servicing, cleaning and lubing far more often that when brake pads need replacing - especially in warm, humid and tropical environments close to the ocean (where I live)...its going to become a "every six months" item on my schedule now.
 
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