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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone else had an EagleMike 'silver and gold' 1/16th inch drill bit fracture when drilling the Torsion spring hole?

I've broken small bits while drilling steel, but this is I believe the first time I've broken while drilling aluminum.

Oh, as of yesterday I finally caught a broken OEM doo spring just in the 'nick of time', so to speak.
Customers 2004, 13,268 miles. Last Serviced 2-11-09, 9800 miles.
Requested Leaky fork seal and EM Doo-Hickey with Torsion spring.

I've yet to personally see a broken doo. Hope I never do.

Here is another tid-bit from the same job. Totally 'weird'.
I removed the rotor bolt, was reaching towards the puller bolt and saw/heard the rotor 'pop-off' the crankshaft taper!!! Thankfully I had the bike leaning to the right.
There was a white powdery stain on the two tapers. About the size of a dime. Almost like a grain of laundry soap mashed onto the shaft. Wiped right off.
 

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pd....I imagine the bit caught just as it was breaking through. That is when most bits get broken. Add into the mix a 1/16" bit is pretty flexible and can easily be deflected sideways amplifying the issue. Hard to hold a hand drill steady enough to prevent side loading a tiny drill bit. It amazes me how far one will bend without breaking.....
General JustJeff
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Broken drill bits happen. I'm fairly cautious of side loading. 40+ years of this shi*.
I was actually more 'intrigued' by the fact that I did not have to use a puller bolt! I had witnesses!
 

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Excactly, West. I was going to post about not needing a puller.

That's just about shocking for a part that ends up almost fused on to the shaft,
so to speak. I want that white wax crap. lol Kinda like banging on a ball joint
for a half day only to have it drop out with just a random tap. Micro-vibrating metal
has unique qualities barely understood. Destroyed a puller on a flywheel and after
a drop of oil and a few taps, the thing popped off with a mallet worked in a circle.

That stuff would come in handy with all the pulleys I bash on the tractor "grooming"
the forest floor next door.

We need the recipe for the secret ultimate grip and release fastener goop !!!!!!!!

CheapAndNotModeratingTonightJustBeingAMember
 

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I've yet to personally see a broken doo.
I believe you, Paul!

While upgrading the doohickey on a Generation 1 appears sound maintenance to me, I think the probability of even Generation 1 doohickey component malfunctions may be exaggerated.

A fellow motorcycle club member, a Kawasaki dealership mechanic for 30 years or so, said he'd only seen one idler shaft lever failure, and it was benign, as far as collateral damage goes.

The doohickey, "sky is falling" crowd will say doohickey failures seldom make it into dealership shops, because KLRistas are inclined to perform their own preventive and corrective maintenance. There may be something to that construct.

Yet, I've wondered: Over 25 + years of production, how many (percentage-wise) KLR650s in service today worldwide have upgraded doohickeys? Do those with stock doohickeys KNOW they are DOOMED? Not unless they have the Internet, I reckon! :)

Inadequate spring tension on Generation 2 KLR650s? A separate issue from doohickey (idler shaft lever) component failure, seems to me.
 

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...
While upgrading the doohickey on a Generation 1 appears sound maintenance to me, I think the probability of even Generation 1 doohickey component malfunctions may be exaggerated...
At least 50/50 for me, but the sample is two KLR650's (2005/2006).
One had it's first examination, by me, at 18,000 miles. The doohickey was broken and the spring pieces were in the bottom only accessible from the right side of the motor. A lot of fishing around with a magnet on a stick got the six spring pieces matched up to make a whole spring. The missing piece of the doohickey was never found. 3,000 more miles and no trouble so far. However, not knowing where that chunk of metal is does not render peace of mind.

I changed out the doohickey on the other KLR as a preventative measure at 1800 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I think I remember Fox Fader posting about a loose doo-hickey locking bolt on his new acquisition. He warned new owners to check for snug bolt.

Well last year I found a loose locking bolt on a 2009 posted here,
http://www.klrforum.com/405825-post6.html

The OEM doo had worn a trench into the engine cover, which I had to re-machine flat, for proper fit of EM doo. That bike had 29,434 miles on it and the spring hadn't yet broken, but surely the bolting bolt had not been loose from day one? Chain and sprockets were fine.
 
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