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My method is if you lift the bottom part of the chain, it should just barely graze the rubber guide thing on the bottom of the swing arm. I believe the manual calls for 2.0-2.6" play with the bike sitting unloaded on its sidestand. You can use a ruler if you want, but you'll find that range is about the same as it grazing the bottom of the swingarm chain guide.

Here's a link that might be of help.

http://germz.org/klr650/chain-tension.html

Chain play is important and worth checking on a regular basis. If it's too little or too much, bad things can happen.
 

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Page 111 of my owner's manual says, drive chain slack should be 1.4 - 1.8 inches.
CraigES,
Pay VERY Close attention to which side (Top-Bottom) of the lower chain run those Arrows in the line drawing are Pointing to!

Which is why the rest of us, Just lift the chain UP, Almost touching rubber? OK.
1/4" Away, TOO Tight.
Bending around the rubber, almost touching metal? Time to Adjust.

This procedure works on both Gen 1- Gen 2.
Provided bike has Standard shock links.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I love the Shazam ya'll put in this cite.

Ok, I get it. No, not everything, but chain tension is a go. Now I know this is a DUH question but I'll ask anyway. Is it possible to do most of this on the side stand? I keep having trouble making it SIT!!, lol. It'll roll over fine...
 

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Monken,
Works on the side stand or work stand, as long as the shock is 'topped-out'.

As in not full touring gear, squashing it down, trying to tip it over off side stand.
In that case, I just push up on the frame, to top-out the shock.

Before tightening the axle nut, put a screw driver between the sprocket and the lower run chain.
Roll the wheel forward, which makes the chain tight, takes the slack out of the adjusters and axle/bearings.
Tighten the axle nut, remove screw driver, re-check chain slack. If 'good', snug the adjuster jam nuts.
Part of the 'trick', is don't over-loosen the axle nut, which allows every thing to go sloppy.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Majority of original tools.

I've got the original tools or at least most of them. Can I be fairly assured of torque with them? Or should I invest?
 

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Monken,
Pretty tight with the extentsion handle on the factory box wrench.
Then 'tighter' to the first cotter pin hole that you can use.
No Need for bloody knuckles, next time, hopefully 800-1000 miles, down the road. And maybe only 1/4-1/3 turn of adjusters then.

I only bend the long leg of the cotter pin, towards the swing arm.
When that leg breaks OFF, I turn it around and abuse the fresh leg.
Go ride, enjoy.
 

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Oiling Chain

New guy here..THis is my first Chain driven bike in 50 years...(Seriously,almost). Tell me how to oil the chain, what to use and how often. I have bought a 2011 KLR with only 1700 miles. Thank you.
 

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the best chain lube i have found so far is from liquid wrench, can get it at walmart or tractor supply fairly cheap. i use my crutch stand to lift the rear tire off the ground then put it in neutral and spray while i turn the wheel.
 

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New guy here..THis is my first Chain driven bike in 50 years...(Seriously,almost). Tell me how to oil the chain, what to use and how often. I have bought a 2011 KLR with only 1700 miles. Thank you.
I don't think it matters much what you use as long as you clean it from time to time and put something on it: lube, grease, wax, WD-40, ATF, whatever. I use grease, myself.
 

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I'm now using (dare I say the WORD?) Honda chain lube; think it's supposed to have Teflon or some sort of super-slick stuff in it . . .

A suggestion: After spraying the chain, use a rag to wipe down the access, as you rotate the wheel and sprocket, reducing the amount of lubricant slung by the chain after oiling.

Interval for chain lubrication? Can't be too often, I suppose; my chain manufacturer recommends every 200 miles or so; doubt I'll do it that often, YMMV!

A TON of video clips and articles about chain lubrication and cleaning are accessible through Google; this young lady does a creditable job with cleaner, grunge brush (available at Cycle Gear and other fine stores), and chain lube:


I agree with her technique generally; however, lubing the chain from the inside of the loop might be better than from the outside, IMHO, as centrifugal force will sling the oil onto the chain rollers more fully when the bike is rolling; a small detail--her way will work fine, I'm sure.
 

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I feel the need to comment about 'her video'.
I truly hope her rear brake is still at least 50% effective! (outer pad)

Best to keep your cleaners and lubes aimed DOWN at the Lower run of the chain, mid-way between the sprockets. Instead of 'fogging' the brake disc.

You have your life, in your hands, use a little 'Caution'!
 
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