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I do not have a center stand for my 2008. I purchased a rear wheel lift at Harbor Freight, but when I lifted the rear wheel it would not spin due to interference with the wheel hub bolts. Are there rear wheel bobbins that can be purchased for the KLR, so that a rear lift can be used? If so, where? If not, what do you use to lift rear for chain lube or tire changes? Thanks.
 

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Just get a stick. 14" long, 1 1/2" diameter. Buy a 4' 1-1/2 dowel for $7 and make three of them. This one came from a larger piece I found in the street 10 years ago. Works fine.
 

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From Harbor Freight

I never used one of these, but seems like a inexpensive way to lube a chain..
https://www.harborfreight.com/motorcycle-wheel-cleaning-stand-98800.html

BTW: I get to use my Harbor Freight motorcycle jack a lot.
Aside from lubing chain, it makes cleaning bottom of bike much easier.
I often just put the bike up on the jack to get it straight, to do things on the bike. (When on side stand, it's more difficult to get at left side to work on.)
A real asset when changing my tires.

I use my lift on all 3 of my bikes. It's paid for itself many times over.
https://www.harborfreight.com/1500-lbs-capacity-atvmotorcycle-lift-61632.html
 

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With the kickstand switch permanently by-passed and the bike idling and myself in a squatting position, I squeeze the clutch lever and then just pull Left & Down on the LH handlebar and carrier rack. This will elevate the rear tire to balance point. Then I snick it into 1st gear, still keeping clutch squeezed the tire will rotate and I spray the left & right sides chain lower run, trying to avoid the suspension links & the tire. Shift back into neutral & set the tire down.

By spraying the inner circumference of the chain run, the lubricant has to go Thru the chain, not just on the outer circumference and then fling back off.

Probably takes about 30-45 seconds & done.
 

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Just get a stick. 14" long, 1 1/2" diameter. Buy a 4' 1-1/2 dowel for $7 and make three of them. This one came from a larger piece I found in the street 10 years ago. Works fine.
Tom, I wonder if you have been snooping around in my rode tool kit.

I use a piece of 1" PVC pipe in place of your hoe handle with a TEE on top. Cut the TEE to make a cup for a secure fit. Put a coupling on the bottom and carry a short piece of pipe in case you need to extend the lift. Stick a screw driver through the holes on the front of your skid plate and put the stand under the handl to get the front tire up. Being hollow allows you keep to long skinny tools inside it. (tire tools, screw drivers ----)

Very handy for chain lub and flat tires on the road.
 

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Sounds like a good and practical invention. Getting the front tire up with Is Stick™ can be done but is tricky.

I must take umbrage at my Is Stick™ being referred to as a "hoe handle". Is Stick™ is made from the finest hardwood dowel that one can find laying in the road whilst commuting to work on a bicycle.

Maybe I will take to manufacturing them and marketing them as the Is Stick Organic Trail Jack™ for $29.95 plus S+H.
 
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I still say that my little PVC stand has several things going for it. It is light weight, extendable, can store tire tools etc, can be used as a cheater for the little short stamped box wrenches in the stock tool kit, won't rot like wood, is resistant to termites, with a skid plate can hold up a front tire for repair and you don't have to sacrifice a perfectly good hoe to get one.
 

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I agree that the PVC is a good idea. I like it for all the attributes you list.

I hope, though, that you have something substantial with you to use as a clubbing weapon. Sometimes there is no substitute for a good whack upside the head.

Again, this is not derived from a hoe. If you continue in this vein I shall send a sternly worded letter to someone. This is the finest quality 100% organic genuine American hardwood that can fall out the back of a gardener's pickup truck.

And wood rot and buggy?? My stick???!! Next, you'll assert that pro wrestling is not real...
 

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With the kickstand switch permanently by-passed and the bike idling and myself in a squatting position, I squeeze the clutch lever and then just pull Left & Down on the LH handlebar and carrier rack. This will elevate the rear tire to balance point. Then I snick it into 1st gear, still keeping clutch squeezed the tire will rotate and I spray the left & right sides chain lower run, trying to avoid the suspension links & the tire. Shift back into neutral & set the tire down.

By spraying the inner circumference of the chain run, the lubricant has to go Thru the chain, not just on the outer circumference and then fling back off.

Probably takes about 30-45 seconds & done.
This requires video! :grin2:
 

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I can't do pics, much less video.
 

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Why so difficult everyone? Floor jack under the shock linkage while resting on the side stand has worked fine for me for years on many bikes. Haven’t dropped one yet. Just loosen the axle bolt before you lift.
 

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Why so difficult everyone? Floor jack under the shock linkage while resting on the side stand has worked fine for me for years on many bikes. Haven’t dropped one yet. Just loosen the axle bolt before you lift.
In my case, I make it difficult because I need to lube the chain daily, as a day's ride is somewhere between 350 and 450 miles. So, up at dawn, prop the bike up, oil the chain, break camp (or check out of the hotel), kick the stick, off we go.

Though I have a lift, the stick method works just as well at home as it does in camp or a parking lot.

I don't understand why you loosen the axle bolt to lube the chain, though.
 

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In my case, I make it difficult because I need to lube the chain daily, as a day's ride is somewhere between 350 and 450 miles. So, up at dawn, prop the bike up, oil the chain, break camp (or check out of the hotel), kick the stick, off we go.

Though I have a lift, the stick method works just as well at home as it does in camp or a parking lot.

I don't understand why you loosen the axle bolt to lube the chain, though.
I like to lube at night to let the oil migrate a little and then wipe off the excess in the morning before riding.
 

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It is better to lube just after the ride as the chain is likely to be warmer. That will facilitate the flow of lubricant.

I don't do that because I usually forget in my haste to get camp chores done so I can have a beer.

In my defense, I'm simply spraying the chain down with WD40 on the inside and outside of the chain and then wiping it down half an hour to an hour later before I kick the stick.
 
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