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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is still in the "So how do I do it?" stage, but the concept seems simple and completely workable. I'm new here and haven't had time to go through all the threads, so if this is a re-hash, I apologize in advance.

Anyway, I was looking at all the gadgets, gizmos and add-ons for the KLR. This KLR is my first, with only 185 miles--a blue 2009. One of the most frequent maintenance checks is chain play and lubrication.

I really don't want to invest in a jack or a center stand, and I was looking at those gizmos that use the carburator vacuum to automatically lubricate the chain. Then, I looked at my 2009 KLR and got to wondering why go to all the trouble of using carburator vacuum to apply chain lubricant, when we've got gravity?

The idea is simple, though the application may prove more complex. My KLR has a plastic upper chain guard with a flat area on top. Imagine the rings that hold a telescope tube (astronomy is a hobby of mine) Basically a clamshell, hinged on one side and a tightening bolt on the other, that holds the cylinder--not unlike a small plastic bottle of about half-ounce size.

Parts needed:

About 3-4 inches of stiff plastic tubing--what comes with WD-40 might work.

A plastic cylinder shaped bottle with a cap like on Elmer's glue.

Take the sponge off of a foam paint brush--about 1/4" wide and glue the upper side of the sponge to the plastic tube. About 1/4" of contact should do it, using Super Glue. This goes under the chain guide, passing through the drilled hole and above the chain.

Adapt the bottle opening on the lubrication bottle to provide a snug fit around the upper end of the tube and glue to seal.

Glue the bottom half of the clamshell bottle holder to the top of the chain guide. I suppose you could even use wood and a few small bolts or screws to hold the bottle in place--it would be a small bottle.

Unscrew the cap and fill the bottle with about 1/4-1/2 oz. of 90 weight gear oil, or whatever you want to use.

Puncture a small hole on the top of the bottle to vent the bottle and allow the lubricant to flow from the bottle, down the tube and onto the sponge. (the size of the tubing and the viscosity of the lubricant would determine the size of the vent hole needed.)

Ride for a few minutes at low speed while the lubricant drains and the sponge spreads it across the chain.

Then remove the bottle and ride for another 500 miles, or until the chain needs more lubrication.

I think this may work, and would sure be a lot less complicated than using vacuum lines or having to use a jack or center stand to get the rear wheel up to perform chain lubrication.

What do you think?

I'm guessing it's already been done.


Coyote
 

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Did the same thing on Friday.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks! I'll give the block of wood under the axle nut idea a try. I knew there had to be an easier, less complicated way to do chain maintenance than buying floor jacks or vacuum operated chain oilers.

Coyote
 

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The guys on the Royal Enfield forum suggest using the breather tube.

They squeeze the end of the tube so it flattens out - duck bill - then position the duck bill over the chain. A fine mist of oil is then sprayed onto the chain using the air pulse from the engine.

Don't ask me any questiosn. That's all I know.
 

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Got MIlk no need to make it complicated. less than $10.00 clams of material






:character00271:
 

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Maprimm, Nice lift;

Coyote, I sprang for one of those red ATV jacks. It cost me $89 and I got a ten dollar rebate so $79 seemed reasonable. I've been using it for almost three years and it makes it nice when doing things other than chain lube. Think tire changing and flat fixing, not only does it lift the entire bike off the floor but you can roll the bike around while on the jack.

Try Kal Gard spray for the chain. It tends to stay on the chain and not gum up the rear rim. Your idea for a lube dispenser is neat but I find the jack and spray system to be quick and pretty easy. As the years and miles go by you will find that having a jack or a stand like the one pictured will be a nice addition to your tinkering tools. Since buying my bike in January 06 I have built quite a collection of tools that are specific to the KLR. Perhaps I will use them on other things but the various repairs and adjustments / upgrades called for an expansion of my tool inventory.
 

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Thanks Hardy
lift has ben modifed since pic it can now be broken doun in 2 pcs and put on my trailer. I use bell ray its clean and stays on
 
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