Kawasaki KLR Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Stupid thread, I know, but I just wanted to make some observations:

I thought it would be easy, because they're tube type tires right? Figured there wouldn't be too terribly much of a bead seat, wouldn't be too much tension getting em on. WRONG!

So it's a huge pain in the butt, and I'm sure tubeless are even harder, and god help you if you actually give a damn about how the rims look (good thing it's a KLR -- I wouldn't be happy to have done this damage to my Concours or CB750!).

But above that, my number 1 observation is that shops overcharge for tire mounting. The hardest part of the operation was the rear wheel, and specifically breaking the bead; I ran over the tire with my truck and it still wouldn't break. So I took it to the local shop that has the tools for the job (shop rate $100/hr!) and they charged me $5. With the right tools, removing a tire takes about the same amount of time as breaking a bead, and installing a tire and tube takes maybe twice as long. So $20, right? I had this shop do my Concours wheels last year: $60 a piece, OFF the bike!

Oh well, what're ya gonna do. It was a pain in the ass, and it took 5 hours all in (including a couple trips for supplies at walmart, beer breaks, frustration breaks, and the trip to the shop), but it's pretty rewarding to have done it myself. I'll probably still cough up the dough for the shop to change the tires on my other bikes, but I hear the shop across the city only charges $20 a wheel...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Good grief. I was planning on doing this in the next couple months. Were they the stock tires? I've never done it either. But last time I paid a bunch on my cb1000r and they scratched the heck out of the rim and used dyno beads to balance it. The bike never felt the same as it hummed and was plagued with vibration. Figured I'd try to tackle tires.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
It's 90% technique and 10% tools......watch some videos and learn. I've never had a bead on a motorcycle I couldn't break with my boot or a mallet. ....I hate changing tires, even though I've done it dozens of times. I don't use any fancy benches or holders figuring it'd make me soft for when I need to do it beside the trail! ;-)



Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Tires were Maxxis something...never heard of em, figured they were a cheapie even compared to the shinkos that replaced em.

That said, the shinkos bead on the rear went on with a fair pop on one side, so I'm sure that won't be easy to remove next time either.

I love garage time though, and it's not like I have anything to get away from either -- I live alone -- I just like to be outside with a beer and my bikes, no matter how much I'm sweating and cursing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
It's 90% technique and 10% tools......watch some videos and learn. I've never had a bead on a motorcycle I couldn't break with my boot or a mallet. ....I hate changing tires, even though I've done it dozens of times. I don't use any fancy benches or holders figuring it'd make me soft for when I need to do it beside the trail! ;-)



Dave
I'm sure I could've broken one rear bead to fix a flat if I really had to (especially if I carried a c clamp...if I kept at it with that I'd have got it I'm sure) tools are a big help though. Tire spoons might cost more than irons, but I didnt even come close to pinching a tube. Worth every penny.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,015 Posts
I'm sure I could've broken one rear bead to fix a flat if I really had to (especially if I carried a c clamp...if I kept at it with that I'd have got it I'm sure) tools are a big help though. Tire spoons might cost more than irons, but I didnt even come close to pinching a tube. Worth every penny.
drumstyx,
If you don't break both sides of the tire bead from the rim, you just increased your degree of 'difficulty' x 10!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If one is working in the home garage, set your wheel on top of a spare car wheel and tire. Support the bike WHEEL or spokes. Gain 6-12 inches of altitude for the old knees. Stop the 'rollie-pollie' effect and prevent the possibility of a BENT brake disc. Working with the disc 'down' in the car wheel leaves more room for knuckles and tire irons.

Real dirt bikes have the rear sprocket rigidly mounted on the left, put the Sprocket down into the car wheel. A smooth edged brake disc is kinder to the knuckles than 'pointy' sprocket teeth!

Keep the side which is opposite of your tire irons compressed into the 'drop-center' of the rim with your knees or "Motion Pro Bead Buddy or two (2) Trail Bead Buddies".

ps, SIX members viewing this thread!!!
That is the most activity I have seen in 6 months!!! Go klrforum.com!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
I had the same issue with a Maxxis rear tire last year. I had a hell of a time breaking the bead first of all and then getting it off the rim was just as hard, all while having sat in 85 degree weather in the sun to soften it up.

I replaced it with a K270 Kenda and I think it is much softer. I am waiting on the replacement for that tire right now but I did get the bead broken and the tire off with much greater ease (although it was 95 degrees out this time).

The front was no big deal.

Waiting for my new Kenda....was hoping to ride this weekend but looks like that's not going to happen-supposed to be perfect weather too..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
drumstyx,
If you don't break both sides of the tire bead from the rim, you just increased your degree of 'difficulty' x 10!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If one is working in the home garage, set your wheel on top of a spare car wheel and tire. Support the bike WHEEL or spokes. Gain 6-12 inches of altitude for the old knees. Stop the 'rollie-pollie' effect and prevent the possibility of a BENT brake disc. Working with the disc 'down' in the car wheel leaves more room for knuckles and tire irons.

Real dirt bikes have the rear sprocket rigidly mounted on the left, put the Sprocket down into the car wheel. A smooth edged brake disc is kinder to the knuckles than 'pointy' sprocket teeth!

Keep the side which is opposite of your tire irons compressed into the 'drop-center' of the rim with your knees or "Motion Pro Bead Buddy or two (2) Trail Bead Buddies".

ps, SIX members viewing this thread!!!
That is the most activity I have seen in 6 months!!! Go klrforum.com!!!!
Good post Paul. :)

Dave
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,609 Posts
including a couple trips for supplies at walmart, beer breaks, frustration breaks, and the trip to the shop
On the plus side you didn't need a trip to the hospital so it's all good. You'll get progressively better at it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DeltaWolf

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Must be something about the maxxis tires maybe. The front was cake, but of course it probably helped that the bead was never actually seated on the front (previous owner is always an idiot, but I'm the idiot that paid too much!), which of course explains the bounce/vibration with wheel speed.

I used a good amount of soapy water to get both to seat nicely, which I hope won't be a problem long term; wouldn't want tires to be slipping on the rim.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Good job, and it only gets faster with practice.

I use a C clamp and two lug wrenches. The main thing is to be careful.
The efficiency will take care of itself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,015 Posts
Good job, and it only gets faster with practice.

I use a C clamp and two lug wrenches. The main thing is to be careful.
The efficiency will take care of itself.
CBT,
I just gotta' ask,
How do you use the "two lug (nut) wrenches to help change a tire on a KLR650?

I prefer tire irons or tire spoons. :grin2:
On the trail or along side the road, I prefer 4, that is 2 PAIR of Motion Pro Enduro Pro Tire Irons!
Very Narrow, nicely hooked for the Removal, and a long 'Smooth' flat end for the install.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,256 Posts
...........
I use a C clamp and two lug wrenches. The main thing is to be careful..............
The rear is the hardest because it actually has a tubeless type ridge at the inner edge of the tire to help hold it in place.

When I got my first KLR and headed out solo on the TAT I took a 6" C-clamp to break the bead, but it was way too big and heavy. I have found that if I pry down for the first bite with two tire irons about 4" apart and then pry up from between them with a flat blade screwdriver, I can break the first bit of the bead loose from that inner ridge. After that I have won the battle with no C-clamp required.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,585 Posts
Paul,

I use the "screwdriver" end. I like the leverage of the equivalent of an 18"
prybar. The ends are smoothed but still very careful not to bite the tube
when prying the tire over the rim. Long enough to put under the brake rotor
for hands free holding it in place while taking the next bite during removal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
259 Posts
I also recently change tires out but on the Bandit. I wanted to do it with nothing but what I had in my tool pouch. I wanted to make sure I had a complete set of only what I needed and be able to get rid of what I did not need.
1st the best tool I had for breaking the bead was these little light weight gems.


They kinda suck for spoons as they are too short but in a pinch they do just fine. It is a lot of technique and watching videos just to know what you will go through. Good for you for taking this on. You have learned a good lesson and passed on good info to us.

The contents of my tool pouch minus the bead breakers.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top