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Discussion Starter #1
cheers guys,

VERY new to KLR's and dual sports in general. been riding for the last 20 years, mostly on "pasta rockets". however i must say that my first few days on a klr has been nothing but bliss. work is sending me overseas and my current stable will not be very welcome (garbage roads, no parts, possibility of host nation police/military take it, etc) with the lot going into storage with family (very sad) and the klr will fit in quite nicely and keep me out of an eff'ing car/truck.

i just bought a end of year (2015) at what i thought was a decent price however after 5 days and only 300 miles I've started to notice a oil leak where the cylinder goes into the case. as its under warranty I'm not going to touch it as I'm inclined to do this sort of stuff myself, but I'm hoping that this will not to be a vision of things to come. (side note I have followed the break in req to a "T" as stated by the dealer and the manual.

first thing i noticed when i looked at the oil level window was that it was filled past the top line...i.e. i see nothing BUT oil. my guess is the kid that assembled the bike out of the create was a bit over zealous with his application of oil... there were a few other things that were concerning such as a brake line zip tied to the frame keeping me from turning the handle bars to the left on my ride home (shipped/created like this? and they forgot to cut the zip tie maybe?) hope this isn't leading to heart ache...

that said the honeymoon has been alot more fun then i expected on the KLR, wicked confy, like the high seat, and its alot easier to attack turns then what i expected... looking forward to getting her squared away/dirty and talking in the sights at my soon to be new home... looking forward to absorbing as much wisdom from you cats as i can.

Cheers
Anthony
 

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Cheers,

When the oil JUST reaches the top of the window with the bike vertical, that's spot on. It should be the middle, but Kawi engineers are not always logical. To say the least. And it may have still been overfilled.

That said, what to do now. That's a tough question. The smart money is taking the bike in. It's under warranty. But I'd be a little concerned, and VERY insistent that they do it right.

Don't worry, though. You get this sorted and you got yourself a pretty bulletproof bike that is tons of fun. And good folks on here.

Welcome to the club. :)
 

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Hello and welcome to the forums! :)

No worries about the oil thing, when you put in the required amount it does fill the window to the top. As far as the zip tie thing, I'm guessing it might be leftover from the crating as well. Other than zip ties to keep things tidy, there shouldn't be any that prevent you from turning the bars. You could take the bike to the dealer to check out the oil weep for piece of mind if nothing else.

Again, congrats on the new wheels and enjoy :bike:
 

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Tip the bike slightly to the left until the oil reaches the top of the window. That will provide an indication of whether it is grossly over filled. My guess is that it's just up a bit so wouldn't give it a thought as it has to be very over full in order for there to be effects. Same for low level.

Rather than inattention, it may be close attention by the PDI person which created this condition. PD Westman pioneered the factor of oil in the crankshaft and side case crankshaft oil pocket. If the engine is stopped with the crankshaft oil passage pointing upward, the oil in the crankshaft and side cover oil pocket remains in place.

If the crankshaft stops with the oil passage angled downward, the oil in the crankshaft and side case pocket drains out into the sump. What may have happened is that the person doing the PDI added oil, ran the engine and had the crankshaft stop with the passage up so added oil to the top of the window. When you stopped the engine, the passage was down so that the extra oil drained and makes the sump appear to be over filled. Not a big deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks again for the welcome, I called the dealer and he pretty much said that same thing about pushing the oil level up to the top, and that if its alittle bit past that its ok. and as for the weep coming out of the case that not to touch it and just bring it in and if its something that needs replacing then they will square it away.

regardless im looking forward to it (the bike). I'm going to do a ride soon up to a friends house in Albany. He's a big dirt rider and said he'll take me around to his haunts around lake George... its been a while that I've gone anywhere near dirt I'm pretty stoked.

again thx for the input and welcome!
 

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Tip the bike slightly to the left until the oil reaches the top of the window. That will provide an indication of whether it is grossly over filled. My guess is that it's just up a bit so wouldn't give it a thought as it has to be very over full in order for there to be effects. Same for low level.

Rather than inattention, it may be close attention by the PDI person which created this condition. PD Westman pioneered the factor of oil in the crankshaft and side case crankshaft oil pocket. If the engine is stopped with the crankshaft oil passage pointing upward, the oil in the crankshaft and side cover oil pocket remains in place.

If the crankshaft stops with the oil passage angled downward, the oil in the crankshaft and side case pocket drains out into the sump. What may have happened is that the person doing the PDI added oil, ran the engine and had the crankshaft stop with the passage up so added oil to the top of the window. When you stopped the engine, the passage was down so that the extra oil drained and makes the sump appear to be over filled. Not a big deal.


i did lean the bike over a good 4 inches i just started to see the air pocket back in the viewer. the service cat also said the same thing, it may be a bit to much (not as much as i thought at first) but not as big of a deal as i thought

. my experience has been to keep it between the "lines" so it might just be a bit of adjustment for me as this if my first taste of a different marquee/bike/engine lay out...total overall motorcycling experience then what I've been use to.

the bike has thus far preformed perfectly so I'll just take a deep breath and enjoy it.

thx again
 

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I strongly recommend installing an engine guard plate in place of the plastic original one. Other almost "must do" for any KLR are lever guards for the handle bars and "nerf bars" to protect the sides of the fairing. Generation 1 (Gen1) are not at as much risk but Gen2 will typically do a lot of damage when dropped as drop you shall or not having any fun.

These are all owner bolt on items for the most part. When selecting an engine (sump) guard, make sure that it is compatible with the nerf bars because some makes conflict which can cause questionable language to be broadcast. The engine guard should also extend far enough back that it does not leave the rear of the sump exposed to sliding over and dropping onto a rock.

A lot profile drain plug is also very useful to reduce risks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Normk,

ive been trolling happy trails site, I'm reading good reviews about their stuff and was going to give their plate and nerf bars a try. thanks for the input.

I did my first bit of "distance" on the KLR. I went from Philly area to Albany talking US 1 and 9W rather then the turnpike and NY thruway. i must say she was rather well mannered and it was an enjoyable ride. anything over 65 mph was a bit of a chore but the route i took keep me mostly at 60-65 mph. i caught myself wringing her neck a bit hard thinking i was on my track and "sunday go to church...aka the twisty back roads near my house" bike... she was quick to protest and remind me that its not always how fast you get somewhere but the ride that matters. once i figured that out we had a great time. and even got a bit "muddy" around lake George ny. all in all. good weekend.
 

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I must say she was rather well mannered and it was an enjoyable ride. anything over 65 mph was a bit of a chore but the route i took keep me mostly at 60-65 mph. i caught myself wringing her neck a bit hard thinking i was on my track and "sunday go to church...aka the twisty back roads near my house" bike... she was quick to protest.
aes1376,
If she seems to be fighting herself to achieve or maintain 60-65 mph, that may very well Be So!

Your drive chain is probably TOO Tight! It Needs to Touch or almost be able to Touch the rear tip of the Rubber Slider Under the Swingarm, when lifted with your finger or boot toe.
If it can't, when you set on it and have someone else check it, it will probably be almost bow-string Tight! This is just one more thing the assembly and prep person or PDI person seem to overlook.

And coming from short suspension road bikes, you are just now learning.
 
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