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Just came across this diagram from, "Care And Feeding of the CVK40," thought I'd put it up:



The starting enricher ("choke") functions as a mini-carburetor; when closed, a plunger seals a hole in the carburetor and a shoulder on the plunger assembly closes an air passage; when open, the plunger is withdrawn from the hole, permitting fuel to flow into the venturi; simultaneously, the shoulder on the plunger assembly moves away from an air passage, permitting air and fuel to mix in a fuel-rich starting mixture.

The starting enricher thus functions as a sort of, "mini-carburetor," mixing fuel and air.
 

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When I glance at it, I see a Ray Gun.

Not to belittle the post, though. It's a handy little diagram that clarifies what happens when one "pulls the choke." I actually had no idea what occurred when one did so.
 

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I actually had no idea what occurred when one did so.
Neither did I, awhile back!

I had thought the starting enricher, when activated, merely uncovered an orifice in the carb, permitting raw gasoline to enter the venturi for starting.

A fellow from Australia, no less, disabused me of that notion; explaining that BOTH air AND fuel enter the venturi by virtue of starting enricher plunger withdrawal; first time I knew of the starting enricher being called a "mini-carburetor," which it is!
 

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Yeah, hell, hayseed I am I always thought it was called a "choke" because it cut down on the amount of air entering the mix, thus making it richer.

I may be wrong, but I think back in the day I learned to "set the choke" on a carbureted vehicle by quickly depressing the gas pedal all the way to the floor and releasing it before trying to start it when it was cold.

There used to be kind of an art to starting a carbureted vehicle and if you were a stooge and did it wrong, you wound up flooded and were kind of screwed for awhile. I think the last vehicle I owned with a manual choke was a '68 Dodge pickup and I'm not sure if the arrangement was factory or something added by a previous owner. It always worked, tho.
 

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Yeah, hell, hayseed I am I always thought it was called a "choke" because it cut down on the amount of air entering the mix, thus making it richer.

I may be wrong, but I think back in the day I learned to "set the choke" on a carbureted vehicle by quickly depressing the gas pedal all the way to the floor and releasing it before trying to start it when it was cold.

There used to be kind of an art to starting a carbureted vehicle and if you were a stooge and did it wrong, you wound up flooded and were kind of screwed for awhile. I think the last vehicle I owned with a manual choke was a '68 Dodge pickup and I'm not sure if the arrangement was factory or something added by a previous owner. It always worked, tho.
You're right; a "true" choke (called, appropriately, a "strangler" by our English cousins), restricted air intake to create a fuel-rich mixture.

The "choke" on a KLR650 ain't a choke at all, but a STARTING ENRICHER.

The business of depressing the accelerator pedal on older automobiles MAY have set an automatic choke; at least, the procedure insured a spurt of gasoline into the venturi from the ACCELERATOR PUMP.
 

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You're right; a "true" choke (called, appropriately, a "strangler" by our English cousins), restricted air intake to create a fuel-rich mixture.

The "choke" on a KLR650 ain't a choke at all, but a STARTING ENRICHER.

The business of depressing the accelerator pedal on older automobiles MAY have set an automatic choke; at least, the procedure insured a spurt of gasoline into the venturi from the ACCELERATOR PUMP.
Indeed. Did some reading on it. That's exactly what the process did.
 
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