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Discussion Starter #1
2011 KLR

I had the interlock switch on left ( clutch ) side quit working today. After removing it from bike, I put it on the bench and checked the continuity with a Digital ohm meter. It seemed to be ok. Measured around 3 - 5 ohms closed, and infinity when open. When I put it on the bike, it wouldn't allow the bike to start.
I put jumper wire on the bike side connector, and bike started ok.

I re-sprayed the switch with a lot of contact cleaner, and blew it out with compressed air. It now measured about 0.5 ohms when closed. Put it back in the bike, and bike started ok.

It seems like the circuit needs to have less than 0.5 ohms, when closed, to allow the bike to start. Any small dirt, or oxidation on contacts will not allow the bike to start.

If you look up the underside of the switch, it has 2 or 3 small holes to allow spraying contact cleaner inside.

I just thought I'd mention this as it seems like it could be prone to being a problem, and an easy one to fix it known about.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Clutch interlock switch

Update: I had the switch quit again out on a ride, so I ordered a new switch.

Any one out there have an issue with their clutch interlock switch, on a gen 2? I know I can jumper the existing switch, but I just like to be able to pull the clutch in to restart if I stall it out in a tight spot. ( I don't like the idea of messing around with finding neutral, if I'm trying to keep from falling over on a rocky up hill with no good footing. )

My bike has only 7,000 miles on it, and has been kept in a basement ( warm ) area since I bought it. Nice and dry, average temp during winter = 70 deg's.
Seems like it should not have acquired switch issues?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Clutch interlock

Well.... ??

Another update. Still waiting for my switch to come in to dealer.
I took the old one off the bike and pulled the switch apart. ( Pretty simple inside. )
The switch looked good. The contacts were clean. I noticed the switch plunger seemed to be kind of grainny feeling, so I buffed all sliding surfaces as smooth as I could. I put dielectric grease on all contacts and sliding surfaces, and reassembled the switch. ( It worked )

BUT

When looking at the junction where the plunger makes contact with clutch, it seemed that there was no space between plunger and clutch handle when pulling in the clutch handle. ( This is position where the switch plunger is fully extended. )

NOTE: This is depending on adjustment of where the clutch engages.
I like my clutch to engage closer to the grip. If adjusted to engage farther away from grip, it will have a small space between plunger end, and clutch surface.
Got me thinking that may be reason so many switches are thought to be bad.
I ground off about 1/16" from tip of switch plunger, an it seems to work better.
 

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i've been thinking about doing the 10A mini fuse bypass to avoid this problem, your troubles have convinced me its time to remove this potential frustration. hope the new switch works out for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Interlock switch

i've been thinking about doing the 10A mini fuse bypass to avoid this problem, your troubles have convinced me its time to remove this potential frustration. hope the new switch works out for you.
I know guys do the bypass, but my feeling is, if I'm on bad footing and stall out, I don't want to try lifting my foot to get into neutral. To easy to loose your footing, and drop the bike. I'll stick with just keeping it in gear, squeezing the clutch, and hitting the starter. A normal functioning interlock switch is needed for that.



.
 

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I know guys do the bypass, but my feeling is, if I'm on bad footing and stall out, I don't want to try lifting my foot to get into neutral. To easy to loose your footing, and drop the bike. I'll stick with just keeping it in gear, squeezing the clutch, and hitting the starter. A normal functioning interlock switch is needed for that.

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I'm not following you there, Larry. I did the by-pass, and can start my bike in any gear, at any time, clutch in, or clutch out. Makes no difference. No need to ever find neutral. Just pull in the clutch (or not), and hit the ignition.

Only drawback are those occaisions when the bike is in gear, parked, and I hit the starter without first depressing the clutch. She will lurch pretty good when I do that!

I'm old enough to remember bikes (and cars!) before all the interlocks. I went to start an older car I had once, forgot to depress the clutch first. The darn thing nearly jumped through my garage wall right into my kitchen! But that was back before garage door openers had electric eyes, before lawn mowers had a squeeze bar that you have to keep depressed to run, back when it was legal to take knives to school...and do some trading at recess! It was a dangerous world back then...don't know how we survived!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Interlock & Dangers of the past

I'm not following you there, Larry. I did the by-pass, and can start my bike in any gear, at any time, clutch in, or clutch out. Makes no difference. No need to ever find neutral. Just pull in the clutch (or not), and hit the ignition.

Only drawback are those occaisions when the bike is in gear, parked, and I hit the starter without first depressing the clutch. She will lurch pretty good when I do that!

I'm old enough to remember bikes (and cars!) before all the interlocks. I went to start an older car I had once, forgot to depress the clutch first. The darn thing nearly jumped through my garage wall right into my kitchen! But that was back before garage door openers had electric eyes, before lawn mowers had a squeeze bar that you have to keep depressed to run, back when it was legal to take knives to school...and do some trading at recess! It was a dangerous world back then...don't know how we survived!
You are right. It can be started as you pointed out. ( My-Bad!! ) Slap-slap!

As far as taking things to school... In my 6th grade ( One-Room-School ) a few guys would bring their rifles to school, and leave them in the entry way with all the coats, boots, etc. After school, they would go hunting.
Country school back then was much different.
BTW: My senior high school graduating class was 16 total. ( 8 boys & 8 girls )
 

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Disable the safetys. It's just another thing that can fail and strand a rider.
Like the days gone by, you have to make sure the clutch is in before thumbing the starter and look at the kickstand.

Ride on Wayne, Ride on Garth!
 

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You are right. It can be started as you pointed out. ( My-Bad!! ) Slap-slap!

As far as taking things to school... In my 6th grade ( One-Room-School ) a few guys would bring their rifles to school, and leave them in the entry way with all the coats, boots, etc. After school, they would go hunting.
Country school back then was much different.
BTW: My senior high school graduating class was 16 total. ( 8 boys & 8 girls )
Got you beat on the graduating class size! Mine was 12 back in '86 - in a small town in California! Absolutely LOVED growing up where I did. Although we never took our guns into the school, we used to keep rifles and shotguns in our vehicles out in the parking lot so we could go shooting during lunch or immediately after school. And yes, we carried our pocket knives into class with us, and nobody stabbed anyone else.
 
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