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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently installed the Moab shock and the DDC's in the front suspension. These additions did exactly what I expected and hoped for.

The stock suspension on my 2014 new edition was not horrible. The front end was a bit soft and the rear a bit harsh on the square edged bigger bumps. The shock preload was set at the middle position which was right for my weight. Dog bones are stock.

My goal was to wake up the front end and make the rear more compliant and not so harsh. The new units accomplished this pretty well.

Zero complaints while dealing with Cogent Dynamics. Tod was super helpful during the order process. He guides you through a very thorough series of questions to determine the exact fit for your shock. The quality of their components are first class. Since I don't ride two up or load the bike down with camping gear and goodies I was able to save some money staying with the stock springs up front.

On the initial test flight the first thing I noticed was the very well planted feel. This is typical for a premium shock vs a stock factory unit. The bike did not deflect off of bumps and held a line in the corner even going over washboard type stutter bumps. It is very compliant and plush in the smaller bumps but firms up in the big stuff when needed. The bone jarring harshness of the stock shock has pretty much been eliminated. The front end with the new DDC's has a more planted positive feel. The soft mushy feel is totally gone.

Both the shock and the DDC's are pretty easy to install. It's not rocket science if you have average mechanical abilities. One thing that was a bit more involved was having to remove 12mm from the factory spacers in the forks. The DDC's are 12 mm tall so you must reduce the factory spacers by the same amount. I used a friends lathe to accomplish this. Most guys will need heaver springs which will come with appropriate spacers to replace the stock ones.

As is the case with most aftermarket shocks the preload setting was minimal. I had to increase spring preload a full 5 turns. Although this may sound like a lot it amounts to about 8mm total. This yielded a total sag right at 63mm and the free sag at 23mm. The rebound clicker was set to the middle position, 13 clicks out from max. This was pretty close to optimal. I tried two clicks firmer and then 2 clicks softer from this middle position. I settled on 2 clicks firmer.

Total price for the package was $1066 and was definitely worth the price of admission.

I must warn you once you go the premium suspension route it will ruin you for stock components.

Ride on brothers...ride on.
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Ditto - I waited a long time on account of I'm a cheap bashtage, even then I managed to find a great deal on used setup from another member here.

The full Cogent upgrade is flipping game changer for the KLR. The rear shock is very tunable and works wonders for the bike. You'll be able to sit through sections where you would ordinarily have stand up and work the knees and arms to accommodate the OEM shortcomings. Likewise, the front end becomes more of a point and shoot. Also sprung for the pre-load adjusters and these are lovely and slick, so easy when adjusting for the additional weight of 50-60 lbs of fuel and 65 lbs of gear.

I had done the upgrade about 2 months before riding a well loaded Gen-2 KLR on the Continental Divide Trail, so I knew it would be better. Just how much better was amazing. Once I got the new suspension dialed in and got comfortable - I could rocket through sh..t that would have tossed me on my ass, it would stick when you needed it, it would also soak up big stupid rocks and ledges (stopped flinching after a few days), and easily dealt well with the major water cuts left by very heavy rains across NM and CO.

As a boomer who grew up on dirt bikes in southern AZ (fav was the KX250), I do have some offroad experience. And as a KLR rider I've rolled up about 100k miles on several bikes (95% on the Gen-1). So I'm familiar with the beast and its shortcomings. Cogent brings an entirely new level of performance.

The hardest part - learning to embrace a the new capabilities of the suspension and not be afraid of powering out.



 

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BTW, looking at your picture it looks like you ordered the needle bearing to assist with preload adjustment. If that’s the case, how well do they work? I included them on the shock I ordered for times I go from day tripper to nomadic camper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
BTW, looking at your picture it looks like you ordered the needle bearing to assist with preload adjustment. If that’s the case, how well do they work? I included them on the shock I ordered for times I go from day tripper to nomadic camper.
Yea since it's not a big ticket item I figured why not.

It does work quite well as the adjustment tool is not very long. When adding preload the biggest help is to un-weight the back wheel.
 

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Yea since it's not a big ticket item I figured why not.

It does work quite well as the adjustment tool is not very long. When adding preload the biggest help is to un-weight the back wheel.
ditto. Honestly I haven't adjusted the preload on my 2001 for a couple years now; my load is consistent. My 2000 has a Pro-Series with the RAP so I play with that one more just because it's so easy.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After I got mine set up, I have left it alone.
Same here. Once I get my shock set I don't mess with it.

If I were camping with the bike and sometimes carrying a big load I would have gotten the remote preload adjuster. But I don't, so I didn't.

A couple of times a year I might strap on a medium duffle that would not weigh more than 15 to 20 pounds for an overnight trip.
 

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Same here. Once I get my shock set I don't mess with it.

If I were camping with the bike and sometimes carrying a big load I would have gotten the remote preload adjuster. But I don't, so I didn't.
In my case, it will be set the same for most of the year. I don't ride two up and I'll camp with the bike once or twice a season. Because it's only a couple of times, I chose the needle bearings and will suck it up and adjust the sag before and after a trip. The RAP seemed like a lot of money for the number of times I would use it.

We'll see how it goes. I'm sure I can have it added during one of the service and rebuilds if I feel it would be a good idea.
 

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KLRs: 2013, 2005, 1998; 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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I put a Moab on my Gen1 and it didn't interfere anywhere. I haven't heard of anyone else having a problem either. Maybe someone will respond here. But I do know that you have to let the swingarm down considerably to get it up past the swingarm and Unitrack lever.
 

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I put a Moab on my Gen1 and it didn't interfere anywhere. I haven't heard of anyone else having a problem either. Maybe someone will respond here. But I do know that you have to let the swingarm down considerably to get it up past the swingarm and Unitrack lever.
Thanks PeteK, I appreciate your response. I don't recall where I heard about potential issues with the swingarm and the spring. It was possibly with the instructions accompanying the shock. It was some time ago.
 

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That's what I wanted to hear. I have a Gen1 and I have heard that some have had to trim some of the swingarm as it can interfere with the spring. I would be interested to hear from anyone that has fitted the Moab on a Gen 1.
You weren't dreaming; there is enough variation that you can get contact between the spring and swingarm web on some KLR's. When I first installed the Moab on my 2001 I noticed that the spring was close enough that the swingarm would touch it sometimes and remove the paint from the spring.....I couldn't feel any functional difference but since I loved my shiny new shock, I filed down the web to create some more clearance. Either way, it's not a big deal - certainly don't let that stop you from buying the shock.

Dave
 

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But I do know that you have to let the swingarm down considerably to get it up past the swingarm and Unitrack lever.
I think that you've got that backwards. Once the lower link is disconnected & lower shock clevis un-bolted, lift the swingarm UP & slip a block under the rear tire, to open the work space.

IF suspension Raising Links (shorter links) were previously installed, the swingarm will set Lower when all is connected. Which will decease the clearance between the front of the swingarm and the shock spring.
If I'm not mistaken on both issues.

If this installation is unknown to current owner, this could also conceivable cause a new aftermarket shock to be set-up TOO Stiff by the shock builders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well crap with all this talk about spring rub and grinding some clearence on the wing arm I decided to take a closer look and it appears my swing arm has been rubbing on the shock spring. So I spent several hours this morning removing the shock and removing some material in the tight areas on the swing arm.Man what a royal pain. Had I known about this issue I would have fixed it a couple of weeks ago when I had the swing arm off the bike. It was vastly more difficult to do with it on the bike.

I also discovered the front clamp bolt on my Delkevic muffler was rubbing on the shock spring. I am gonna stop reading you guys posts cuz they end up creating a lot more work for me. :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

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Well crap with all this talk about spring rub and grinding some clearence on the wing arm I decided to take a closer look and it appears my swing arm has been rubbing on the shock spring. So I spent several hours this morning removing the shock and removing some material in the tight areas on the swing arm.Man what a royal pain. Had I known about this issue I would have fixed it a couple of weeks ago when I had the swing arm off the bike. It was vastly more difficult to do with it on the bike.

Sorry to hear that, especially after you have recently had the swingarm out. I too decided to do some research, as to where I had heard about it and it turns out it is included in the fitting instructions that accompany the shock from Cogent.

Instructions: Section 3.2.2 Component Parts.
"On many KLR 650s (not all) the shock spring can touch the cast web that runs between the two swingarm sides. Normally this is not an issue but the paint may become rubbed on your spring. Some bikes also have this issue with the stock shock. Heavier shock springs can make the possibility more likely. A modification of the casting web adding a small amount of additional clearance using a half round file or a rotary tool is possible."
 
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