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FTX9-BS battery is a 'Bottle-Serviced' AGM battery, not factory filled/not charged. Thats what the -BS stands for in this case.
Battery Life starts the moment the dealership 'tech' plugs in the 6 pack of acid. What happens after that determines how strong & how long that life is.

The AGM (-BS) batteries are a 'never again add fluid' battery.
 
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Since I brought it inside and charged it, it’s been good and bike starts even when it’s chilly 0°.

My 2022 doesn’t have a AGM battery, at least I dont Think it is. It has the cap that covers the cell openings. And the dealer tech said they get shipped dry and fill them when they do the PDI or put it together.
I think they just didn’t charge it enough, and / or being in a trailer on the highway for 4 hrs, then sitting all night in -8, dimmed all the juice it had.

It wasn’t frozen or bulged though. IMO it’s too small for the bike. Likely all that’s needed for 3-5 years, but not a drop more power than you need.

My 2012 Honda foreman 500 had a battery close to twice as big. This battery is about the size of a small Chinese ATV’s. I can see why people buck up for LiPo and high quality ones. Yet comparing a bikes battery to a quads isn’t very fair, or practical. My quad starts in -30°C.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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From my above posting, I think it shows that I am.

The starter motor is only Capable of consuming 'X' amount of amps. But I don't know what 'X' is and I have no way to measure it. But the longer one cranks on a starter motor the Less amps there are available from any battery, correct?

Would one be in total error to suggest that we might consume 10% of possible maximum CCA with each 5 second cranking cycle of a starter motor at 0 F? Maybe 5-8% consumed at 32 F?
Not the same thing. Think about those deck-of-cards size lithium battery packs that can start a big V8 engine—lots of CCA (cold cranking amps), but not a lot of AH (amp-hours). Lead acid batteries keep about the same voltage level as they discharge, until they get about 80% discharged, then they “fall off the cliff.” And they deliver about the same CCA (cold cranking amps) until that “cliff” point too. Other factors being equal (and they rarely are), a higher AH battery will deliver the same amps for longer, or more starts, before it reaches the cliff. A higher AH battery usually is bigger and has bigger internal components, more plates, etc., so that it usually also can deliver higher CCA, but not necessarily. It depends more on how the battery was designed and for what usage. RV/boat “deep cycle” batteries do not need to deliver high CCA, but they do need to maximize AH and be able to take the abuse of deep discharge cycles.

Starter current: there is no maximum “consumption” of amps on a starter motor, (until you reach its mechanical torque limit or you start melting insulation!). It will draw whatever it has to draw to turn over the engine. When it’s really cold, your starter probably draws twice the amps as when it starts a warm engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Some snippage...My question...why would you start your quad at -30C/-22F? That's sit by the fire and enjoy a good whisky temp.
It’s a rare occasion but I use the quad to plow snow, and hunt up north. It’s cringe worthy turning an engine over that cold, and if possible I’ll try and heat it up.
 

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Starter current: there is no maximum “consumption” of amps on a starter motor, (until you reach its mechanical torque limit or you start melting insulation!). It will draw whatever it has to draw to turn over the engine.
So what you are saying here is that when people accidentally install three shims on one starter reduction gear shaft while doing the doo-hickey, which locks up the system so the starter Can Not turn, even the lowly little KLR starter motor could pull all 135 or 190 or even 300+ amps from a battery if one could put that large of battery into the bike, correct?

Maybe they put the smaller battery into the new bike to save people from themselves. ;)
 

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(Irrelevant post follows.) In my perceived experience, lithium battery-powered devices have no graceful discharge curve. Instead, the lithium batteries work fine until they, "tire," then they shut down completely, abruptly, needing charging. Lead-acid, or dry cell batteries lose power gradually as the power source discharges; no, "sudden death" as with lithium power. YMMV! :)
 

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PDW: yeah that’s it—save people from themselves!
I don’t know how much current the starter will draw before it turns into a smoke grenade, but that will be the result!

Damocles: Full discharge usually ruins a lithium battery, so most lithium batteries have built in circuitry to prevent them from going to full discharge. It appears that the battery just stops. Lead acid batteries, with some design variations, keep their voltage pretty constant until they reach the “knee in the curve,” after which they drop off quickly. IIRC, a fully charged LA battery reads 12.6 volts, but an 80% discharged one reads about 11.8. This is from ancient memory, so I could be off by a couple tenths.
 
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