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Discussion Starter #1
I smelled coolant the other day when I got home but did not see anything and the bike was not overheating so I dismissed it. I noticed it again so I looked closer and saw some dried coolant on my exhaust. I pulled the plastic and saw I have a hairline crack in the reservoir about half way down. It barely seeps. If I keep an eye on the level do you guys think it is ok to keep riding it until I get a chance to change it?
 

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You can probably get away with watching the level because the reservoir is for excess coolant. But I would at least slap some Gorilla tape or Flex Seal tape on it.
 

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I used a product called Seal All and it did the trick on a small crack in my o-flow tank.
 

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I rode mine for most of a season with sun-rot crack leakage in the top half of the level viewing window.
As long as you keep an inch or more in the bottom with a cold engine it will be fine.

Ride On!
 

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Yep, technically you don't need the overflow tank - it just makes life easier; very few of my real offroad bikes used one.

Dave
 

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Just remember Dave that a 100% filled radiator is actually more efficient than a radiator/cooling system mixed with air.

Sort of like the difference between an Emulsion Shock & a DeCarbon Shock!
 

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Just remember Dave that a 100% filled radiator is actually more efficient than a radiator/cooling system mixed with air.

Sort of like the difference between an Emulsion Shock & a DeCarbon Shock!
correct me if I'm wrong; the only time the coolant goes from the pressurized side into the overflow is when the coolant gets warm enough to expand and push past the pressure cap seal (i.e. overheating), right? On my KX's/YZ's/CR's/RM's/XC's, etc. there was no overflow reservoir - if the bike overheated it puked coolant out of the overflow and you needed to replace it.

Dave
 

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In one of my other hobbies (classic cars and drag racing) the cars typically don't come with overflow bottles either - NHRA makes you add one for the track so that if/when your engine overheats, you don't spill coolant on the track - in fact you aren't allowed to use antifreeze as it's slippery and hard to clean up. .....but the cars were designed without coolant overflow bottles, just a hose.
 

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correct me if I'm wrong; the only time the coolant goes from the pressurized side into the overflow is when the coolant gets warm enough to expand and push past the pressure cap seal (i.e. overheating), right? On my KX's/YZ's/CR's/RM's/XC's, etc. there was no overflow reservoir - if the bike overheated it puked coolant out of the overflow and you needed to replace it.

Dave
This interests me. On my quest for removing things I should leave alone, I like the idea of yanking mine for a while. I could just watch for coolant overflow/temperature spikes. That would open up more room for my horn/modified wiring placement. In real world, mostly street/playing around in fields and gravel, how often would your bike puke up? Maybe stick a little bottle on the end of the hose with some vent holes in the top so you could see the escaped fluid.
 

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This interests me. On my quest for removing things I should leave alone, I like the idea of yanking mine for a while. I could just watch for coolant overflow/temperature spikes. That would open up more room for my horn/modified wiring placement. In real world, mostly street/playing around in fields and gravel, how often would your bike puke up? Maybe stick a little bottle on the end of the hose with some vent holes in the top so you could see the escaped fluid.
Keep in mind that dirtbikes don't lose traction if you get coolant on the tires so I would recommend something to catch and excess fluid for street use. Unless I'm missing something, your bike shouldn't often push coolant into the overflow - my offroad bikes seldom puked coolant and the KLR has a fan...

Dave
 

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The only reasons it should “puke” coolant are, if the radiator is overfull and it spits out a little because of expansion, or the engine overheats and boils coolant out. My 1953 Hudson Hornet does not have a catch tank and it doesn’t lose coolant. But it has a fairly large top tank on the radiator that allows for expansion.
 

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This interests me. On my quest for removing things I should leave alone, I like the idea of yanking mine for a while. I could just watch for coolant overflow/temperature spikes. That would open up more room for my horn/modified wiring placement. In real world, mostly street/playing around in fields and gravel, how often would your bike puke up? Maybe stick a little bottle on the end of the hose with some vent holes in the top so you could see the escaped fluid.
You GUY's really should read this, Cooling system air
Before doing that!

But yes, you could make a quite a bit smaller recovery bottle & put 1-2 ounces in the bottom. Check out Motion Pro.


Keep in mind that dirtbikes don't lose traction if you get coolant on the tires so I would recommend something to catch and excess fluid for street use. Unless I'm missing something, your bike shouldn't often push coolant into the overflow - my offroad bikes seldom puked coolant and the KLR has a fan...

Dave
Dave, a properly operating recovery system should transfer some fluid Back & Forth everytime the engine reaches full operating temperature. This is why some people whine & wimper about one or two drips from the coolant pump weep hole. And that is Normal also.
 

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You GUY's really should read this, Cooling system air
Before doing that!

But yes, you could make a quite a bit smaller recovery bottle & put 1-2 ounces in the bottom. Check out Motion Pro.



Dave, a properly operating recovery system should transfer some fluid Back & Forth everytime the engine reaches full operating temperature. This is why some people whine & wimper about one or two drips from the coolant pump weep hole. And that is Normal also.
This is where I'm struggling; WHAT exactly is the difference between the cooling system used in the KLR and my 1999 KX250 that the KLR REQUIRES an overflow to run properly? I understand that air mixed with the coolant is a bad thing but does that really happen when the bike does NOT overheat? You say the coolant recovery system transfers coolant back and forth - how? aren't our rad caps around 15psi? My KX did not lose any coolant unless I got it so hot it boiled out.....typical of all my cars and bikes.

I'm not arguing; If I'm wrong, I'd like to understand how - as I've said, I've owned 20 cars and 30 motorcycles that did not come equipped with overflow/recovery tanks. Up until now, I've assumed that it is a convenience/safety item and not a neccessity.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Some interesting replies here. First on my original question. The guy at the local mom and pop hardware store sold me something that was less than $5 with tax that he says he used to fix his poly gas tank six years ago and a coolant tank in a truck four years ago and said both are holding strong.

I am leery of the idea of a total delete. Most of my older tractors do not have coolant recovery tanks and I have to constantly top them off. Now the dual radiator thread got me thinking. The coolant thank essentially works on a siphon principal. The coolant expands and pushes the excess out... when it shrinks back down it pulls it back in. It is almost a similar concept to using a tube and bottle to bleed brakes by yourself without getting air in the system. It should not matter where the recovery tank is located as long as the tube is below the level of the coolant in the tank. First, I wonder how much benefit two radiators would give you? Next I was thinking that I could run a tube to the back of my bike and put a tank where my evap canister went. You could do this even if it was just to make space like Verrmented was talking about. I do not see why this would not work.
 

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This interests me. On my quest for removing things I should leave alone, I like the idea of yanking mine for a while. I could just watch for coolant overflow/temperature spikes. That would open up more room for my horn/modified wiring placement. In real world, mostly street/playing around in fields and gravel, how often would your bike puke up? Maybe stick a little bottle on the end of the hose with some vent holes in the top so you could see the escaped fluid.
You GUY's really should read this, Cooling system air
Before doing that!

But yes, you could make a quite a bit smaller recovery bottle & put 1-2 ounces in the bottom. Check out Motion Pro.


Keep in mind that dirtbikes don't lose traction if you get coolant on the tires so I would recommend something to catch and excess fluid for street use. Unless I'm missing something, your bike shouldn't often push coolant into the overflow - my offroad bikes seldom puked coolant and the KLR has a fan...

Dave
Dave, a properly operating recovery system should transfer some fluid Back & Forth everytime the engine reaches full operating temperature. This is why some people whine & wimper about one or two drips from the coolant pump weep hole. And that is Normal also.

This is where I'm struggling; WHAT exactly is the difference between the cooling system used in the KLR and my 1999 KX250 that the KLR REQUIRES an overflow to run properly? I understand that air mixed with the coolant is a bad thing but does that really happen when the bike does NOT overheat? You say the coolant recovery system transfers coolant back and forth - how? aren't our rad caps around 15psi? My KX did not lose any coolant unless I got it so hot it boiled out.....typical of all my cars and bikes.

I'm not arguing; If I'm wrong, I'd like to understand how - as I've said, I've owned 20 cars and 30 motorcycles that did not come equipped with overflow/recovery tanks. Up until now, I've assumed that it is a convenience/safety item and not a neccessity.

Dave
If your 1999 KX250 could have sucked that ounce back into the main system on the next long straightaway (rather than sucking air), it may never have actually over-heated at ALL.
Neither you nor I ride in Australia or Arizona summer heat.

In our northern climates, a slightly entrained air cooling system can operate acceptably well on our dirt bikes or my '55 Chevy pick-up.
But now we both can realize that they could have operated 'Better' if we had re-filled them to the maximum before a hot days ride/drive.

The recovery bottle simply eliminates the need to 'top-off' the system to guarantee 100% efficiency, because it automatically keeps it 100% topped off.
If you care to remember, it was another rather simple (IMO) cooling system issue which 'broke the camels back' between Glenn at klr650 . net and myself.
 

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Paul, thank you. Here’s the proof.
How many times have you seen the animated movie "Cars"? :)
That looks to be a nice ride. How do your lady friends or wife like it?

I installed a coolant recovery tank on my '55 Chevy pick-up in the winter of '79-'80 when I rebuilt its engine, after I hand Polished the top Brass radiator tank & steel valve cover. :)

Here is the Motion Pro universal coolant recovery kit,
 
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