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They had the damn thing Guitar string tight.
"They" never 'adjusted it' like the A & P manual told them to do when prepping your bike after finishing its assembly.

Slap happy, gitt'er done attitude of too many dealer 'mechanics' & their bosses.

Is your headlight still WAY TOO HIGH also? The A & P manual tells them to put the windshield ON, TOO SOON!
"They" aren't going backwards, takes too much time! :( :( :(
Probably wouldn't Read the A & P manual If it was handed to them. :(
 

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If one reads the owners handbook, one might find that Kawasaki is still recommending 21 psi in both F & R tires, for average sized riders, even though the bike has gained about 50 lbs since 1987 & the USA speed limit has raised 25 mph since then.

A fellow KLR rider, customer, friend, riding partner & I found clear back in 1987 that 32 Front & 30 Rear is a very rideable tire pressure in most all conditions, terrain types with-out airing up & down.
actually that is not true. For all loads the front is 21psi, but for loads over 201lbs, the rear is 36. What is odd is the scale is 21 or 36. That is over a 50% increase in pressure.
Your tires dictate pressure, what is stamped on the tire is what you should go by.
 

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If one reads the owners handbook, one might find that Kawasaki is still recommending 21 psi in both F & R tires, for average sized riders, even though the bike has gained about 50 lbs since 1987 & the USA speed limit has raised 25 mph since then.

A fellow KLR rider, customer, friend, riding partner & I found clear back in 1987 that 32 Front & 30 Rear is a very rideable tire pressure in most all conditions, terrain types with-out airing up & down.
actually that is not true. For all loads the front is 21psi, but for loads over 201lbs, the rear is 36. What is odd is the scale is 21 or 36. That is over a 50% increase in pressure.
Your tires dictate pressure, what is stamped on the tire is what you should go by.
I'll suggest that you didn't read my posting very thoroughly!
 

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'08 KLR
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Actually I did! I just never assumed what the weight of the rider plus gear, of the average rider is. I do not have access to enough data to make that assumption!
You assume Kawasaki did have enough data when they made the decision to have 21 psi in the front tire for all weights and conditions, and either 21 or 28 psi in the rear ('08, see pic) depending on rear tire weight?
Rectangle Font Parallel Number Pattern

How many riders do you know that have ever separately weighed front and rear tires under loaded (or any) conditions? The vast majority of riders will simply say, "It's in the manual," as if that makes it correct.
 

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There are many typos in the manual, what if the 21 was supposed to be 31 and just got printed without proof reading?
Over thinking?
I suggest at this point, we all agree to disagree. We all have our opinions based upon our own reasons with regards to air pressure. I value everyone's opinions and consider them all. But this topic is never ending.
 

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You assume Kawasaki did have enough data when they made the decision to have 21 psi in the front tire for all weights and conditions, and either 21 or 28 psi in the rear ('08, see pic) depending on rear tire weight?
View attachment 39500
How many riders do you know that have ever separately weighed front and rear tires under loaded (or any) conditions? The vast majority of riders will simply say, "It's in the manual," as if that makes it correct.
Wow
He posted “Kawasaki is still recommending 21 psi in both F & R tires, for average sized riders,”
All I said was that is not true, and it is not. Nothing to debate. The manual never mentions average weight and gives two pressures for the rear. 21 and 36 psi. For the 2022. I am not saying what pressure is good, bad, wrong or right. Just what manual states. I did comment on the range and pressure were odd. At a load of 214 it is 21psi and at a load of 216 it is 36psi. And at 215 it is either. By the manual. Just non debatable fact of what manual states.
I put in what feels right and watch the wear pattern.
 

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2022 Kawasaki KLR 650 Gen 3
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There are many typos in the manual, what if the 21 was supposed to be 31 and just got printed without proof reading?
Over thinking?
I don't think it's a typo, unless the sticker on the LS swing arm, the Owner's Manual and the Service Manual are all typos. They all read the same. I do agree that 21 psi is a bit soft, I've been running my front at 25 psi cold, no issues, and it's a little quieter.
 

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He posted “Kawasaki is still recommending 21 psi in both F & R tires, for average sized riders,”
No, that is incomplete/ incorrect quotation on your part.
I said "one might find that Kawasaki is----------------------------------------------------"

If one reads the owners handbook, one might find that Kawasaki is still recommending 21 psi in both F & R tires, for average sized riders, even though the bike has gained about 50 lbs since 1987 & the USA speed limit has raised 25 mph since then.
I do Not have a 2022/2023 owners hand book to read.


All I said was that is not true, and it is not.
I beg to differ. Kawasaki printed the manuals, I did not.

I dis-agree with Kawasaki manuals on numerous things & I'll tell anyone my views when I feel the/they need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
You just had to stir the pot again...
Yeah, but it really doesn't matter, does it? My bike, my choice. You ride 21 front,/36 rear, I ride 32 front/30 rear (I am over 201 lbs btw) and we are both happy. Enjoy your bike
...and we haven't even touched on the benefits of Nitrogen-filled tires! (For disclosure - I'm generally a 34/32 kind of guy, but with "regular" air...) :p
You know that’s funny someone should bring up Nitrogen. The military loves it. I love it. I think the issue is the cost. I almost dumped 5k on a machine that would last longer than my expected time on planet earth. I would love to run nitrogen in all my vehicles but in the end I just dumped a few hundred on a good line dryer for my compressor. I still have a nagging feeling that I should buy the machine and add it to my home shop. I get enough people using my lift that I could make way more back in beer (my entrance fee to my shop if you need my help) than the machine would cost.
 

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I think the biggest advantage to nitrogen is that it doesn't change pressure as much as air in response to tire temperature. I believe this is why the military likes it for aircraft tires (as do civilian airlines) - because those tires go from as low as -40 or -50° at altitude to smoking hot at touchdown, and minimizing thermal expansion/contraction and the associated extreme pressure changes associated with oxygenated air is critical for tire longevity and aircraft safety.
As regards nitrogen's molecule being larger than oxygen's and thus having greater resistance to leaking directly through the tube wall, the air around us is already ~78% nitrogen - if leakage through the tube walls is the sole source of pressure drops, a few top offs should mean one is soon approaching 100% nitrogen as what's leaking out is the oxygen. That said, I would personally put nitrogen in my tires if it were ready available, but I wouldn't pay extra for it.

Edit: Changed "air pressure" to "tire temperature." Good catch Mr. Westman. I try to proofread, but I always think I wrote what I thought I wrote.
 

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I think the biggest advantage to nitrogen is that it doesn't change pressure as much as air in response to air pressure
Ah - thanks! I knew that there was a rational explanation for the use of nitrogen in tires, rather than cheap, old air; my neighbor told me that his bike has nitrogen in the tires because it makes his bike faster, but then he's so full of it...(hot air, of course!).
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
So the OCD part of me likes the fact as temps go up and down in the winter where I live…. The tires would stay the same pressure. Now with our KLRs we burn tires pretty fast but for instance in a higher end sports car pressure matter more. I had an old Camaro that had pretty fat rear tires and I kept 35 in them. As I ran back and forth to west palm beach and work every weekend I noticed the middles of the rear tires were wearing faster than expected. I suspect the pressures went up on the highway and I was at a higher psi. All in all I agree. If the guy at the shop asked me if I wanted nitrogen for free I’d love to have it.
 
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