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Hello,
Just bought 2007 used klr 650. Reading about this dohickey proplem. What is it? How do I fix it? Where do I get the parts?Can I do it myself? Bike has 3200 miles.
Thanks in advance
 

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Hello,
Just bought 2007 used klr 650. Reading about this dohickey proplem. What is it? How do I fix it? Where do I get the parts?Can I do it myself? Bike has 3200 miles.
Thanks in advance
Yes, you can complete this upgrade. There is wealth of information on line regarding the identification of the balancer shaft lever [doohickey], and it's replacement. A good place to start reading:

http://www.bigcee.com/klr650faq.html

If ya looky over here, part 131168 is the balancer shaft lever [doohickey]
part 92144 is a coil spring that is prone to fail. There are two options for replacement: an upgraded coil spring or a torsion spring. Current approval leans toward the torsion spring.

http://fiche.ronayers.com/Index.cfm/Module/Main/TypeID/26/Type/Motorcycle/MakeID/3/Make/Kawasaki/YearID/44/Year/2003/ModelID/4079/Model/KLR650/GroupID/127671/Group/Balancer

Here is tutorial on the doohickey replacement:

http://www.klr650.marknet.us/doohickey.html

And a video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26oSOrvv_e8


There are three things that will start riots, range wars, mass banning, requests for technical information from the Unibomber and for normally well balanced people to become Internet stalkers. Those topics, in this order, are: Oil threads, tire threads and vendor threads.

There is much mis-information regarding the country of manufacture of the balancer shaft lever [doohickey] marketed by Studebaker / mashonline / KLR650.com. It has been implied that this balancer shaft lever is made in China, from sub grade material and displays poor craftsmanship. Investigated, it is found that the balancer shaft lever [doohickey] marketed by these businesses is machined in New York state, [A Yankee state, but still considered to be in the USA, for those with patriotic concerns] from adequately tested material. Just to uncloud the water, so to speak. There have been no documented cases of failure regarding these non-Chinese balancer shaft levers marketed by these businesses. All offer outstanding customer service with knowledgeable tech support. [Tech support is NOT available at 3:00 AM on holidays. For those inconvenienced by this atrocity, there is Dial a Prayer.]

Here are a few vendors that supply the balancer shaft lever [doohickey]

http://www.tpi4x4.com/KLR650/Doohicky.html Good service history with them

http://www.angelfire.com/ut/moab/parts_frames.html

http://www.klr650.com/Doohickey.htm Good service and tech support

There are many "tech days" held around to install doohickeys and other upgrade / maintenance, share tools and ideas. Check regional forums for upcoming events.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you!

Thanks soo much for your informative reply. As I said I'm new to the klr and will no doubt have more question! The newbie area was great also!
 

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I'm planning on doing the doohickey upgrade one of these coming weekends. Is changing just the torsion spring a sufficient upgrade? Is swapping the doohickey itself vital? are changing gaskets a must? is changing to a brand new rotor bolt a must?
 

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I have been told to replace the bolt, and one of the YouTube diy doohickey video made it a point to point out the replacement bolt. My main concern is how to determine if the upgrade has been done or not before buying all the new parts.

Jeff
 

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Thanks Jeff.
i appreciate your answer. I think I'll just wing it and put in the torsion spring. The guy who told me about it said that's all he's every done and he has never had an issue. I'm just keeping my fingers crossed that none of the gaskets go to hell once I start pulling stuff off.
 

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I'm planning on doing the doohickey upgrade one of these coming weekends. Is changing just the torsion spring a sufficient upgrade? Is swapping the doohickey itself vital? are changing gaskets a must? is changing to a brand new rotor bolt a must?
The answer is "generation-dependent."

Generation 1 KLR's (before 2008) have a maintenance history of doohickey (idler shaft lever) failures; Generation 2 (2008 and later) have no doohickey failures of note, but . . . spring tension surfaces as an issue.

I believe torsion spring upgrade involves considerable wrenching, in contrast to ordinary coil spring replacement.

So, if I had a Generation 2 KLR, I think I'd inspect spring tension and replace the OEM coil spring if lacking. With no latter-day doohickey component failures, and no maintenance issues traceable to the newer, factory-updated doohickey, I might just dance on with who brung me (while acknowledging better fit-and-finish of aftermarket parts).

If I had a Generation 1 KLR (which I do), I'd replace the doohickey and install a torsion spring (which I did; all in, new rotor bolt and everything).

I've found Eagle Mike's parts and service most satisfactory.
 

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Thanks LoneRider.
I also ride first gen (2001)
I'll play it safe and most likely go with the complete overhaul....It's funny how fast things can change.
 

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Does the "Torsion spring" eliminate the need of the "Coil springs" ....
I've been reading and watching so many things I've gone and confussed myself... :S
 

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Yes, torsion spring eliminates need for coil spring. EM instructions say use one or the other, not both.


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

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If I were doing mine now, I'd go with the torsion spring. Mine has a coil spring, but it was done 5 years ago.
 

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The answer is "generation-dependent."

Generation 1 KLR's (before 2008) have a maintenance history of doohickey (idler shaft lever) failures; Generation 2 (2008 and later) have no doohickey failures of note, but . . . spring tension surfaces as an issue.

I believe torsion spring upgrade involves considerable wrenching, in contrast to ordinary coil spring replacement.

So, if I had a Generation 2 KLR, I think I'd inspect spring tension and replace the OEM coil spring if lacking. With no latter-day doohickey component failures, and no maintenance issues traceable to the newer, factory-updated doohickey, I might just dance on with who brung me (while acknowledging better fit-and-finish of aftermarket parts).

If I had a Generation 1 KLR (which I do), I'd replace the doohickey and install a torsion spring (which I did; all in, new rotor bolt and everything).

I've found Eagle Mike's parts and service most satisfactory.
I didn't find this to be true. For me it was pretty straightforward. It takes a bit of elbow grease to because the spring does everything in its power to stay put, but I think it is pretty simple.



People have reused rotorbolts. I wouldn't make a habit of this and only do so in a pinch.

IMO, (I speak as a gen 1 bike), the doohickey is only 30 dollars, torsion spring about 10. If you are going to go to the effort of getting that deep into the bike, just do both of em.

Tusk makes a 5 dollar gasket. It is made from a fiberous material, so you only probably get one use out of em. It only costs about $5/pc...might save some money there. Sold at rockymountain atv - a place where you can get genuine eagle mike parts if memory serves me correctly.
 

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doo hickey spring.jpg
When I pulled my 06 apart the spring was missing completely. Luckily I was able to fish out out of the case. I guess I got lucky it didnt do any damage. Just my two cents for for anyone who might be on the fence about changing to the torsion spring.
 

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doohickey repair confusing

The author of the doohickey repair (klr650.marknet.us/doohickey) starts out with really detailed instructions but there are holes in the second half. In fact there is enough detail in the first part that you could even make your own tools, or find a substitute. But by the reassembly stage, he leaves out major steps and jumps around a lot...I mean he will jump forward then back and some steps are completely missing. I guess he assumed you would just do the reassembly in reverse of disassembly, but it would have been nice if he didn't jump around as it's confusing. :wacko:
 
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