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I have an 09 model which I bought new. You mention not to throw away the tube that goes in the oil filter. I can not recall there ever having been such a tube in my bike, though I have always thought there should be. I change my oil every 3,000 miles and now have 38,000 miles on the bike. What effect does the lack of that tube have on my engine? I see the tube you mention shown in a parts blow up and assume I should order one.
Note the description of K part #16156-002. Piston-Assy, Valve, By-Pass.
The function of the part is to allow cold thick oil to By-Pass the filter media just temporarily, to fill the interior of the oil filter, the oil pipe, the hollow crankshaft, hollow camshafts and hollow transmission shafts and therefore Equalize the oil pressure on the Interior and Exterior of the oil filter. Thus preventing the cold thick oil from crushing the oil filter.

With-out the by-pass valve "pipe" (and its spring and plunger piston assy) inserted into the oil filter, the oil never is filtered. It just takes the path of least resistance, thru the open holes of the large rubber grommets.
I recommend that you order and install one at your earliest convenience.

To understand the oil filter system a little better, watch the video in this posting,
http://www.klrforum.com/448425-post6.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I have an 09 model which I bought new. You mention not to throw away the tube that goes in the oil filter. I can not recall there ever having been such a tube in my bike, though I have always thought there should be. I change my oil every 3,000 miles and now have 38,000 miles on the bike. What effect does the lack of that tube have on my engine? I see the tube you mention shown in a parts blow up and assume I should order one.
Yes you should have one so by all means order one and install it. The effect of a missing tube is that the filter is largely bypassed.....but as long as you change the oil regularly and you haven't had any issues which would cause contamination you are probably fine though it certainly isn't a good thing. Most of the 40 bikes I've owned have been MX and offroad bikes and very few actually even had a filter so it's not like it's an automatic death sentence. .....that said, most people that discover the tube missing are only going an oil change or two without it, not 38,000 miles. I'd put it in and not stress about it.

Dave
 

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Wow! So helpful. Thanks DPelletier! I've ridden dirtbikes my whole life. My friend convinced me to do a mini adventure with him and I was hooked. I'm now the proud owner of a 2008 KLR 650 with 10k miles on it. The exact model you don't want. I guess I should have read this first. It's dead stock except crash bars. I'm an okay wrench and even use to be a professional diesel mechanic, but never had a bike with fairings, and all this extra stuff. What manuals do you like for the KLR? I read this whole thread and your suggestions for what do to when getting a new / used bike and will follow that, but I don't really want to change out the cylinder and stuff. Is it really that bad?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Wow! So helpful. Thanks DPelletier! I've ridden dirtbikes my whole life. My friend convinced me to do a mini adventure with him and I was hooked. I'm now the proud owner of a 2008 KLR 650 with 10k miles on it. The exact model you don't want. I guess I should have read this first. It's dead stock except crash bars. I'm an okay wrench and even use to be a professional diesel mechanic, but never had a bike with fairings, and all this extra stuff. What manuals do you like for the KLR? I read this whole thread and your suggestions for what do to when getting a new / used bike and will follow that, but I don't really want to change out the cylinder and stuff. Is it really that bad?
Don't stress about the 2008 stuff; most is very minor and some never develop the bad oil burning problem. You should do the doohickey upgrade when you can and Eaglemike sends the spacer to deal with the "deep hole issue" if you tell him it's for a 2008. Other than that, just check and go through the wiring harness for rub points; you should be able to google the common spots.

Never let the bike get low on oil and keep the level at the very top of the sight glass. Monitor the consumption and consider the 685 if it gets excessive.

Manuals? I have both the factory service manuals (KLR600 and 650 suppliment) and the Clymers.....the Clymers is easier to use for most.

Cheers and happy riding.

Dave
 

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t is not mine. I already read this topic. This happened to a friend today after having the oil changed to the KLR in a car shop. I share the photos for the benefit of all and thus illustrate the mistake made by the owner of the KLR and which was noted in this article by DPelletier. I also share what was done to remedy it with JP Welder. I hope it fits.
 

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To remove the oil case, where I can find information to remove it from the KLR without having to disassemble the entire motorcycle and weld it. My friend is sad.
 

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I'm not a MIG guy by any means. I can hardly spell MIG, so consider that in the following.

Can't you weld it in the position it is in? That case screw might be a bit in the way of your torch, but I don't think it should come out for fear of creating a seam leak.
@DPelletier @pdwestman @campfire
 

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At least the treads aren't STRIPPED and the boss is not Missing Pieces.

They probably dropped the Thick Aluminum Gasket into the dirty oil drain pan and screwed in an aftermarket magnetic drain plug with incompletely cut threads, which 'wedged' the un-supported side of the drain boss open! DANG THEM!!

Grooving the crack with a small rotary file (Dremel Tool) burr and filling/overlapping the area with JB WELD, IS the best option in this case, IMHO.

If it is welded, the welding will burn the sealant out of the center seam. Which can be re-sealed with about 4 inches / 100mm of JB WELD both fore & aft of the drain plug boss.

Otherwise it will Require a Complete engine Tear-down!
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
unfortunately there is no oil pan on the KLR, it's integral to the side case making it no easy fix. Most just use JB weld.....taking the engine apart, splitting the cases, welding and putting everything back together is out of the skill range of most backyard mechanics and it would be cost prohibitive to pay someone by the hour to do all that - making engine replacement the likely choice for a proper repair.....hence the popular JB weld! If I was going to try to seal it up with JB weld, I'd probably use a rubber sealing washer to avoid leaks at less torque.....Toyota makes one IIRC.

Dave
 

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I'm not a MIG guy by any means. I can hardly spell MIG, so consider that in the following.

Can't you weld it in the position it is in? That case screw might be a bit in the way of your torch, but I don't think it should come out for fear of creating a seam leak.
@DPelletier @pdwestman @campfire

Using a MIG welder would mean that you would have to have a spool gun for aluminum. I think TIG welding (Heliarc) would be the way to go on that. It could be done with the bike on it's side, and grind out a channel along the crack.
Look for someone who does bike repair with a TIG welder in the shop, and you'll probably find someone who would welcome the challenge. I know my son would with his new Miller.
I would also drill the end of that fracture, along with still putting in a thread repair kit.

Good luck, you'll get it back on the road I bet.
 
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better than jb weld

unfortunately there is no oil pan on the KLR, it's integral to the side case making it no easy fix. Most just use JB weld.....taking the engine apart, splitting the cases, welding and putting everything back together is out of the skill range of most backyard mechanics and it would be cost prohibitive to pay someone by the hour to do all that - making engine replacement the likely choice for a proper repair.....hence the popular JB weld! If I was going to try to seal it up with JB weld, I'd probably use a rubber sealing washer to avoid leaks at less torque.....Toyota makes one IIRC.

Dave
A thing called ( pig-putty ) makes jb weld look like gum. We used it in the electric field to stop leaks in transformers, one can patch a leaky boat in the water with it. Dries in 20mns. I used it on a friends Harley, as he put a hole in his oil line, cleaned it and put 2 coats on it and he drove around for a few days before replacing the oil line.
( clean up the area, and put a small bit on, and let harden, then put a second over the first. ) Its good stuff, can be drilled and tapped.
A good welder could tell what the case is made of and also take care of it accordingly. If it can be soldered or braised, it can bbe don upside down.
Hope any of this helps.
 

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Add one more to newbie mistakes. Following Dave’s numbering system, this would be:

3.a. When dropping the steering stem to inspect/clean/grease the lower bearing, be careful not to pinch the speedometer cable between the steering head and lower triple clamp steering stop tab upon reinstallation. You’ll end up mangling it as you try to figure out why the steering isn’t turning smoothly.
 
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