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Discussion Starter #1
little background, I'm 70 years old , 6' tall and 220 inseam 30'. I've had my 2012 KLR about a year. The problem is this spring I have dropped the bike 3 times from a stop or near stop. I know I must be squeezing the front brake . The bike is so top heavy can't hold it up. Can't lift it by myself. I have not done it major damage other than scratches. I have lowered bike 2" helped some am going to lower it another inch. I don't ride off road just commute and fun rides on pavement. What do you think. I have learned a lot from this forum in last year and value your opinions. Thank you.
 

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Hello! In addition to dropping the bike a couple of inches (I'm assuming with lowering links?) you can get another inch or two lower by getting one of the lowered seats. I'm guessing that with a 3 or 4 inch drop and a 30 inch inseam you should be able to flat foot it, or very nearly :).

The front brake thing at a stop will dump you pretty quick... It throws you off balance as well as the bike, making it very hard to prevent it from tipping (as you well know). I've nearly dumped mine a few times like that, and it seems much worse if I'm tired or it's a really hot day and I feel kind of draggy. Being as the KLR is top heavy and has a tall skinny front tire it seems to compound it. I think stopping pretty much vertical is key, and keeping the front brake light as you come to the final stop. Like I said, in my situation fatigue factors in heavily... Lol, my reflexes go for pot when I'm tired! ;)
 

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Have you been riding for a long time? I only ask because when I first got the klr I couldn't pick it up by myself until I learned a better technique for picking it up. I tried searching youtube but it seems like everyone lifts their bike facing it and I find that to be lifting with your back which is more difficult.

I squat next to the downed bike with my back against the seat. If it fell on the left side, I grab the clutch side grip with my right hand and my left hand is on the left rear grab bar. At that point it's kind of a deadlift type lift. I pull up with my arms as the bike is coming up.

It's a little easier if the bike fell on it's right side because I can put the kickstand down before the lift and hold the front brake during the lift.

Edit: This guy shows it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeLkrPkjimo
 

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.............
Edit: This guy shows it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeLkrPkjimo
The video technique is fine for bikes like my Goldwing and those shown in the video that only fall half way over, but the KLR can fall so that the edge of the seat is on the ground.

I lost a foot in an accident and now can't bend my leg far enough to get into a good squat for lifting the KLR like I used to. I got a cargo bar that acts just like an old bumper jack with 36 inches of lift. I used some 1/8" cable to rig a lifting loop from the frame down tube on each side of the seat up to the edge of the seat. A small cable loop just above the jack head has a closeable C-link which clips onto the lifting loop on the bike. I used a piece of 1" pvc pipe strapped along the lower rear subframe member on the left side to serve as a scabbard like a rifle scabbard on a horse. With this I can drop the bike out in the middle of the Nevada desert on the Trans-America Trail with no one around and slide out the jack and jack it up and keep on riding.



http://www.walmart.com/ip/Reese-Carry-Power-Ratcheting-Cargo-Bar/17043485
 

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A 30 inch inseam would make it hard. I'm a 34" and consider the bike tall. Maybe the KLR is not the bike for you. Have you looked at other bikes that are lower? My wife rides a CB300F and it's a neat little bike with enough power. I lowered it 2" for her and she flat foots it at 5"4". Maybe it you are not riding trail, you are on the wrong bike. These bikes are light weight and low.
CB300F


Also the Suzuki 650 has been around for years under many names:
 

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Agreed with all that's been said.

All I wanted to add is that if you have the luxury of pretending you have a four gallon tank, 20 lbs can make a lot of difference that high and forward.

I think with links and a new seat, you'll be fine, but I'm also curious why a KLR for mostly street? I mean, I use mine for mostly street, but my reasons were wanting a "bulletproof" bike. It turned me into an occasional off-road rider, but that wasn't the plan.

If that made any sense, good. Waiting for the caffeine fairy to do her thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I picked the KLR because riding position ,and reliability. I don't care for the cruiser seating hurts my back plus the KLR feels more like the bikes I rode in the 60's. I got back into riding about 3 years ago and have been having a lot of fun. I also have a Vulcan 500 I ride sometimes. not as much fun as the KLR.

Toney You are probably right bike may not be for me but don't want to lose too much money on trade.

I thank all of you for your replies
big papa
 

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Toney
I have been looking at other bikes. The CB300F happens to be one of them. The dealer here says will have couple this Saturday but the don't last long and are not discounted. The price will be $5500.00. The weather is supposed to be nice think I'll try to take look at one.
 

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big papa,
You have lowered the rear of the bike. But have you also Lowered the Front?

On street only riding, you maybe able to slide the front fork tubes 1&1/2 - 3 inches Up thru the triple clamps to lower the bike more. (Use caution! I know the F.Tire can lightly rub the F. Fender at 1&1/4 inch of drop, when 'aggressively' riding thru intersection water dips.)
 

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With 1-3/4" of front drop the rake angle is close to Stock and Standard of a full height bike, instead of chopper geometry. Which was what I was concerned you did have.
 

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I am pretty much on my toes at stock height, i can get one foot close to flat if I slide over a lot. I think you could use a lower seat but also a little more practice. I had to adjust my habits with a tall bike and its been great ever since. That is for on road. Off road is hard for me because if there is a dip or un even ground, its a biatch to get a solid foot down. On pavement is fine. Heck for most quick stops, I just balance and don't even put a foot down :)


Crash
 

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I put a set of lowering links on my wife's CB300F and lowered the front forks about an inch. The links dropped the rear almost 2 inches. Bike still handles the same. They're not that fun to put on. Took about two hours. Also cut and welded the kickstand shorter. The bike is fuel injected! Wish my KLR was!!!!
 

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The KLR is top heavy - particularly with a full tank of gas. Having a 30 inch inseam, if you stop with the front wheel near full lock, you can't get your foot past the center of gravity and the bike will fall.
 

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Idea's for picking up a KLR, and lowering.

First: Picking up a KLR... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaSLaG2ZL1U

Second: Lowering idea's.
I installed 1" lowering links on my 2011 KLR, and lowered the front to match. ( 1" )
This dropped the center of my seat just about 1" from it's stock level.

I also took my stock seat to a auto upholstery shop, and had them shave about 2" off the rear of seat. Tapered to 0" near middle. Between both modifications, I found the bike much easier to touch down with both feet flatfooted. ( I'm 5' 11" with a 32" inseam. )
No noticeable difference in seat comfort.

I also had a good pair of steel toe work boots with high ankles. I took them to a shoe repair shop, and had them put thicker soles with a kind of rubber material.

All these things didn't come anywhere near the cost of a custom lowered seat.

Made a huge difference in both my off & on road riding.

Check out my details, and pictures of seat mod. here.... http://www.powers31.info/2011_KLR650.htm Scroll down to the 5th item on page. Just below the section on saddle bag frames.
 

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... I got a cargo bar that acts just like an old bumper jack with 36 inches of lift. I used some 1/8" cable to rig a lifting loop from the frame down tube on each side of the seat up to the edge of the seat. A small cable loop just above the jack head has a closeable C-link which clips onto the lifting loop on the bike....
I like this idea and I think I'm going to build this set-up.

Thanks!

Tom
 

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The video technique is fine for bikes like my Goldwing and those shown in the video that only fall half way over, but the KLR can fall so that the edge of the seat is on the ground.

I lost a foot in an accident and now can't bend my leg far enough to get into a good squat for lifting the KLR like I used to. I got a cargo bar that acts just like an old bumper jack with 36 inches of lift. I used some 1/8" cable to rig a lifting loop from the frame down tube on each side of the seat up to the edge of the seat. A small cable loop just above the jack head has a closeable C-link which clips onto the lifting loop on the bike. I used a piece of 1" pvc pipe strapped along the lower rear subframe member on the left side to serve as a scabbard like a rifle scabbard on a horse. With this I can drop the bike out in the middle of the Nevada desert on the Trans-America Trail with no one around and slide out the jack and jack it up and keep on riding.



http://www.walmart.com/ip/Reese-Carry-Power-Ratcheting-Cargo-Bar/17043485
Pictures in action, would be appreciated, Go Motor!
 
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