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Discussion Starter #1
2008 KLR - Purchased a new sealed battery at the beginning of the riding season as the original was getting slow to start. Ran the new one for a month and went on a three day trip. It got progressively harder to start and on the third morning it was dead. I thought it was just a bad battery so got another in July and charged it up exactly to specifications. Again, gets progressively harder to start and , after a two day trip it barely starts so now I am thinking it's the charging system.

Attached a volt meter today with the following results:

Battery at rest, not running - 11.76 v, running - 11.29 to 11.55 v, 3000 rpm - 11.42 v, running at idle after 5 minutes - 11.66 to 12.15. Not running and headlight on - 11.21 v.

I have a Clymer manual and it would appear it's the charging system - either there is a short in the charging wiring or a problem with the Sator or Regulator?

Any advice oh wise KLR owners?
 

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I've never dug into a KLR charge system, but I had to trouble shoot my Suzuki Cavalcade and my Honda NX250's systems.

If the Clymer manual has instructions in it's trouble shooting section, try to follow that.
If you have a multimeter, use it both to measure voltages at different points as per the manual, and ohm / continuity as per the manual.

The stator wires can be ohm'd out and the regulator can be measured for output as well by measuring voltage at different points in the chargeing system.

Sounds like there is a problem in the generation of voltage from your readings.
You should measure, at the battery, at least 13 - 14 volts while the bike is running at least 2,000 rpm.

Good luck.

If you have accessories wired, You may want to disconnect them to see if any are causing shorts.
Also check for possible shorts in your wiring harness.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Okay, so I charged up another battery to start from fresh and did the Regulated Voltage Test which resulted in acceptable readings of 13.1 to 13.5 volts. I tested the Stator - 0, tested the Regulator - 0 which according to the Clymer Manual indicated they were okay.

The next order of business was a Battery Current Draw Test (disconnected neg cable and tested for draw between the cable and negative terminal) and found a draw of 2.7 volts. That appeared to be why I was losing my battery over the month? I started checking the wiring harness and noted a big jump in draw (8 volts) when I jiggled the Starter Relay. I removed the Starter Relay and found two things:

1. There was a 30 A fuse in it even though it specifies a 20 A fuse ( the spare was also 30 A)

2. The fuse was melted on one side and welded in the socket





Now I am by no means a mechanic or an electrician so I am assuming this is my problem? Can anyone confirm this would cause the draw in power from the battery and that by replacing it, I will solve the problem? I would also like to know if the 30 A fuse was improper?

Any assistance with my questions would be appreciated.
 

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The 30-amp fuse (and condition of its mount) suggests the PO was blowing 20-amp fuses; probably because of an undetected and unrepaired short-circuit.

My own assessment . . . ain't nothin' wrong with a 30-amp fuse, don't want no 20-amp fuses blowing over l'il ol' things . . .

Checking continuity (or lack thereof) between harness wires and ground may be in order (looking for short-circuits), with wiring diagram and multi-meter in hand.

Wish I could be more specific, but long-distance troubleshooting has its limitations!
 

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NOTE: If you start checking continuity, make sure you disconnect your battery's positive lead from the battery.
Ohm meters ( Continuity checkers ) don't like voltage on them!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you larry31 and LoneRider, once I get my new Relay I will start checking wires in the harness.
 

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Looks like it was drawing between 20-30 amps for an extended period of time, causing it to melt like that. That's why PO changed to a 30 amp.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Why would the fuse not blow? Could it be just a faulty Starter Relay? As soon as I get the replacement installed, I will check for a draw, I guess if there is none it was the Relay.
 

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Why would the fuse not blow? Could it be just a faulty Starter Relay? As soon as I get the replacement installed, I will check for a draw, I guess if there is none it was the Relay.
Probably drawing over 20 amps (That's why PO changed to a 30) , but under 30 amps so fuse didn't blow, melting of fuse indicates drawing for enough time to get hot and melt.
 

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Why would the fuse not blow? Could it be just a faulty Starter Relay? As soon as I get the replacement installed, I will check for a draw, I guess if there is none it was the Relay.
A relay is just a switch it won't draw much more curent than it's rated. It will open up like a fusable link.

My guess... the starter is shorting out. Disconnet it and run your current check again.
 

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Thank you larry31 and LoneRider, once I get my new Relay I will start checking wires in the harness.
Which relay? Starter circuit relay, or starter relay?

Spec, don't know about checking the starter for a short-circuit; the starter's only in the circuit when the starter relay is closed. Won't draw any current, shorted or not, when the starter relay's open.
 
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