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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

I have been considering purchasing the EM klx jet kit carb mod and was wondering if it was worth doing. I also read about the .22 cent mod and the L mod. What is the difference between them? Are these something that are paired? I am outfitting my KLR for long hulls leading up to a 2 year trip so I am wondering what would be the best options here. I appreciate any info related and not. Any and all information is what I like! THanks so much!
 

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I installed a KLX kit in my 2017 KLR with the recommended jets and it made for a stronger nicer running engine.
Later I decided to try the MCP jet kit and I am impressed with the results. I would go with the MCP kit myself.
 

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The $0.22 mod will smooth your engine a bit. Specifically, it will solve the problem of 'surging' at cruise if you're having that. What it does is advance the needle a little bit, bringing the richer portion of the needle circuit on sooner. But it makes a noticeable difference for very little effort — it just involves putting a washer under the needle's "head."

The KLX kit will open up a lot of possibilities because it's capable of providing a much richer fuel mix than the stock setup (or the 22¢ mod). If you know you want to open up the airbox or install aftermarket exhaust, the KLX kit will be a better solution than the $0.22 mod. It's more involved though, because you'll be replacing parts in the carb — this includes the needle, the main jet and possibly the idle jet.

The MCP kit is a new entry on the scene, and because of how the inventor's unveiling transpired on this forum, it's somewhat controversial. That said, I don't think we've seen anyone who's installed it come back and say it's been bad. Everyone has given it a positive review, and a few have been rave. Some have moved from the KLX kit to the MCP and reported an improvement. Note that some reviewers, however, have claimed that the MCP kit dropped the RPMs of the engine at a given speedometer reading, which result is not possible without changing parts in the transmission or drive. These claims are likely due to enthusiastic installers getting perceptually carried away in response to increased power and smoothness, which has cast some skepticism on these reviewer's reports.

The MCP kit is more similar to the KLX kit in the sense that you install a new needle, main jet and possibly idle jet (although I believe MCP's recommendation is to use the stock idle jet now, so it's possible you'll just swap out the main and needle). The main thing with the MCP kit is the needle — it's tapered in a way that is unlike either the stock needle or the KLX. The stock needle enriches dramatically toward the end of the needle circuit, while the KLX is a very smooth transition from start to finish. The MCP is in between these two. On the downside, the MCP needle is not adjustable like the KLX kit — it's more like a stock needle with a custom shape (taper). I believe adjustment, if it's needed, is done by placing washers under the MCP needle's head, a la the 22¢ mod.

The other thing about the MCP kit is that in addition to changing existing carb parts, you'll also install a rubber O-ring under the needle SLIDE (not the needle, but the entire slide assembly). This is new part for the carb, and is an interesting addition, as it's aimed at delaying the point at which the needle circuit becomes active. The idea here is that the KLR's carb has a tendency to allow the needle circuit to start feeding fuel too early (I believe the claim is that the stock carb does this even at idle, or perhaps just off idle) and raising the slide effectively cuts this feeding by increasing the cross-sectional area of the space under the slide. Increasing this area is said to drop the velocity of the air coming through the carb (same amount of air, forced through a larger opening = slower air movement). Dropping air velocity decreases the venturi action acting on the needle orfice, which sits, of course, directly under the slide. This is said to be an 'old CV carb trick' I believe. But, there is some uncertainty about how this actually works. Raising the slide also raises the needle, for example, which enriches the needle circuit. Presumably the MCP needle has been designed with this in mind.

Overall, it's like the 22¢ mod costs a little and does a little. The KLX kit is a sure shot for more power and smoothness, and it's been proven over and over. The MCP kit has only (I believe) positive reviews, but there isn't enough data yet to truly stack these results against those from the the KLX kit. Your choice will depend on what/who you trust, how much time you want to put into it, and how interested you are in experiment.
 

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the 22 cent mod is a bandaid to get around the overly lean stock low-mid throttle settings. It works, but the KLX kit is much better.....there is no reason to do the 22 cent mod unless you don't have the $40. ANY jetting change and you should at least pull the airbox snorkle. The L mod (or easier 4 - 1" holes in the airbox top) further increases flow with no real downside other than a slight increase in intake noise. Do NOT do any airbox mods until/unless you rejet.

rejetting will fix the factory lean condition and have the KLR running as it should. You can expect a bit more power, better throttle response and your mileage will likely drop slightly - though I'd point out that running your engine overly lean to get a couple of MPG doesn't make much sense to me....

As far as the KLX vs. MCP kit thing goes, this is a bit of a touchy subject here......the originator of the kit came on and made some pretty wild claims and basically attempted to "reinvent the wheel" by modifying the stock needle, adding an o-ring, etc. without actually trying a KLX needle/kit first.....when he finally did try the KLX needle, he said that it does basically the same thing. Since that time, he has apparently re-designed his needle and kit and has some lofty claims - some of which frankly stretch the limits of logic. BUT (and that's a big but) so far any and everyone that has tried it has posted glowing reports....in fact some of those reports also stretch the bounds of logic which has cast further suspicion by some. Many that have tried it are comparing it to the stock jetting so there is no surprise that there is improvement. Less people have compared the MCP and the KLX kti but again, in fairness, those that have seem to prefer the MCP kit. There was one dyno that showed the MCP producing more power but since the KLX jetting the poster used wasn't ideal, that test wasn't that enlightening.

In the interest of being fair and balanced, I purchased an MCP kit and installed it in my 2000 on the weekend. I will post a more detailed opinion of the kit later on when I've had more oportunity to try it out and to compare it to my 2001 which is running a properly jetted KLX kit but whild I haven't noticed any massive power increase, first impressions are that the kit is comprehensive with good instructions and the bike seems to be running well using it. I have a pic of the stock needle, KLX, Dynojet and MCP that I'll include in my later report.

Dave
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Discussion Starter #6
Very good information Dave, I'm curious to hear your findings. Thanks so much. I'm leaning towards the KLX because it has a longer history but like you said I've heard nothing but good about the MCP as well.
 

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I installed the KLX kit from Eagle Mike and it smoothed out the mid range part throttle response and eliminated mild backfiring on the overrun. I live at 5200 feet elevation so I used the main jet Mike recommended. It's worth while but I'd not say it's exactly dramatic.
 

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Awesome, Dave. Glad to hear you're doing this.
Have you installed your own MCP kit yet, samuel? Compared its performance with the KLX you now have (installed, I understand, under the advisement of an acknowledged expert)?

If not, what are your plans?

"Inquiring minds want to know!" :)

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The representations by the vendor (not that he has any conflict-of-interest) on ADV seemed, to me, far-fetched (to say the least). No quantifiable, measurable claims were made; just broad and subjective generalities, e.g., "CRAZY Power!" [Note: I think such posts were deleted from ADV; don't know why or by whom.] Dynamometer charts later posted by the vendor ignored the typical rpm range of KLR service life.

That said, many modifications are evaluated in the, "head-space between the ears" of the modifiers. Historically, effusively positive comments once surfaced from users of the (forgive me for mentioning this, pdwestman!) PCV Valve Mod.

If a rider only THINKS a mod provides additional power, improved fuel economy, lowered oil consumption, etc., even lower rpm in the same gear at the same speed, then . . . no harm, no foul. Few have convenient availability of any performance test equipment (dynamometers, air/fuel ratio instrumentation, etc.), and . . . KLRs are seldom seen in the crucible of competitive racing. Thus, the true significance/consequences of modifications may never be known, in factual and quantifiable terms. No matter. May those satisfied with their modified KLRs ride them in good health!
 

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Growing up in southern California gearhead culture I can't guess how many times I heard some guy say, "heck, if ya THINK it made a difference it did." Another old saw was, "if it don't go, chrome it."

Hope springs eternal and claims of "crazy power increase" never end. Pass the popcorn........
 
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