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I need to get some engine guards for my KLR. There are so many out there..need some feedback from everyone on the brands they have, ease of assembly..etc
 

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I have the SW Motech brand and very satisfied. Necessary to remove the seat, tank and footpegs to install. Able to install with no help in about 3hours. The bike has been layed down fairly hard on the trail and believe they've payed for themselves in what I would have to spend to replace shrouds.
They also provide a nice place to perch your feet to give your legs alittle relief when riding on the highway.
 

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I have the HT bars. They're easy to install as long as you're careful around the voltage regulator. It took about an hour to get mine on. Fit and finish is iffy. Even if you are methodical and do everything right, some of the "joints" don't quite fit flush when bolted together. I think they could improve the design and strength of these bolted-together joints and the U-Bolt type clamp that secures the "crossbars" to the frame under the tank doesn't inspire a lot of confidence.

I think it would take quite a blow to penetrate their defenses enough to crack one of your fairings, but am not sure how much force would be required to actually damage your radiator since the "crossbars" are actually bolted together and not one solid piece and the frame clamp they both bolt to seems to be the weak link.

I chose them because I'm cheap and got a good deal on a combo of the bars, skidplate and highway pegs. I use the highway pegs a lot and I like carrying stuff forward and low, so that kit allowed me to incorporate a tool tube and also "pannier" bags on the bars for stuff I carry all the time.

I can't vouch for their durability during spills. From what I've read, the SW Motech bars have a better, more solid attachment design. I've never seen any in person, though, so can't verify that. I've read reports of riders with both designs who felt they worked good when they were tested.

I use the HT bars, but if I were shopping today and money wasn't an object, I'd probably go with the SW Motech bars. I think they're superior in the looks department, too.

I've read reports of the HT bars either doing their job or not doing their job, depending on the circumstances and severity of the spill, but I don't think I've ever read a report where the SW Motech bars didn't live up to their reputation.

Surely there are some more folks on this forum with first-hand experience on how either of these brands performed when needed. Unfortunately (or fortunately, I guess) I'm not one of them.

It would be nice to see a side-by-side comparison with photos of how both kits install, or at least attach. You can only tell so much by reading about them online. I may be wrong about the SW bars having a better design to transfer loads to the frame, but from what I've read and seen, this seems to be the case.
 

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I would also like to get the same kind of feedback from everyone.
Brands (HT, SW Motech, Givi, etc.), ease of assembly, fit with skid plates and, particularly, ease of access to the engine after installation.
 

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I would also like to get the same kind of feedback from everyone.
Brands (HT, SW Motech, Givi, etc.), ease of assembly, fit with skid plates and, particularly, ease of access to the engine after installation.
With the HT bars, you can remove one bolt and loosen another and the bars will pivot down out of the way to access the engine. Or, remove two bolts and they're completely off. For one side, that is. Two bolts per side.
 

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I would also like to get the same kind of feedback from everyone.
Brands (HT, SW Motech, Givi, etc.), ease of assembly, fit with skid plates and, particularly, ease of access to the engine after installation.

I have th SW Motechs. I haven't needed to remove them yet to work on the bike. Have done the Doo, valve checks, wiring harness, .22 mod, aftermarket skid plate, etc. Removing the shrouds is a little difficult you have to turn them just right to get them on and off, not a big deal though.
 

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Disregard my last post. With the HT bars, you have to remove two bolts and loosen one bolt per side to swing the bars down. There's really not much you can't get to just reaching through 'em, though.



This is the large pivot bolt on the bottom you would have to loosen.



This is the top front bolt you would have to remove.



This is the top, rear "crossbar" bolt you would have to remove.



Another shot of the "crossbar" that provides the load-bearing from the outer parts of the guards to the bike's frame. Two basically slip in through the shrouds, one from each side, then overlap in the middle and attach to an aluminum u-bolt style clamp that goes around the frame. When installing the crossbar on the right side, you have to make sure it's routed properly around the voltage regulator. The instructions show you how to do it.
 

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I have Givi bars sitting right next to me. I plan on installing them tonight if I don't get too caught up in Black Ops.

The Givi bars apparently DO NOT fit with the normal JNS skidplate. They are in the process of making one to fit with the Givi bars. I didn't realize this and bought the JNS skid plate. That is a damn nice piece of metal. Made in the US0fA! and looks to be very sturdy. Just wish I could mount it up right now.





EDIT: Took about an hour to mount the Givi bars. Only issues were:
1. The larger of the three bolts in the front of the engine. Was hard to get the bars to line up so the bolt would go all the way through.
2. I had just finished mounting my Happy Trails panniers, and they put too much pressure on the rear mount, so I had to remove them in order to get the mounting bolt to go in,
 
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