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Discussion Starter #1
was getting ready to remove the upper fairing to change the low beam bulb again. i find it odd that my low beam has gone out twice and the high beam not at all considering the high beam is used a lot more than the low..... but that's another thread i guess....

i know the picture is a little tough to see but there appears to be a very fine crack running away from the mounting hole.



i'm looking for any advice on how to prevent any further spread of said crack. if it were sheet metal i would drill a small hole at the end to prevent further propagation then weld it up and blend it out but it's plastic and i'd prefer not to drill a hole that i couldn't fill in some inconspicuous way.

so my idea is to chemically weld the crack from the inside but what to use....... super glue? acrylic cement? PCV cement? ABS cement? something else?

has anyone had success doing repairs like this and how did you do it??
 

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Were I in your shoes I would use an epoxy specifically formulated for plastics. I've used it for other plasticky things and it works great.

Were you in my shoes, you would use an unsightly electrical tape repair, but mine's black, not yellow.........
 

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Were I in your shoes I would use an epoxy specifically formulated for plastics. I've used it for other plasticky things and it works great.

Were you in my shoes, you would use an unsightly electrical tape repair, but mine's black, not yellow.........
lol. Good answer. I'd use gorilla duct tape, but....

Yeah, some kind of plastic specific epoxy. I wouldn't sweat it too much though. Throw some epoxy on and ride. :)
 

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I've got some electrical tape around the rear top fairing bolt hole where I cracked it being heavy-handed removing the tank without the fairings: just got pissed and kind of ripped the tank out past the plastics.

That electrical tape has been on there for 5 years. It's hardened into a kind of plastic on its own. I consider it a permanent repair.
 

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Q Bond

a4twenty,
There is a plastic repair product that I have seen on another forum, called Q Bond. Goggle "Broken tab solution, Q bond", you might can possibly see a video or 2.
A friend has used it. Radiator shroud tabs on a Gen1 KLR. Worked great/strong.
Available at Amazon.com and some auto parts stores.
 

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I have used acetone. Brush it into the crack on the back side and give it time to set up. It takes a bit of experimenting. Also plumbers ABS cement with fiberglas drywall tape has worked wonders . I have punched holes in the fairing and managed to glue eveything back in place (I even found all the broken pieces) and it has held ust fine for 4 years. Dont ask how I mange to punch holes in the fairing. I have used this method to reinforce the mounting lugs when they have cracked as well
Hope this helps
Randy
 

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Now this sounds like a damned good idea to me.
I agree! Since it's just a small crack (hairline even) I don't think that any radical repair method is required. Epoxying a small washer to the bottom side of the fairing should keep the crack from spreading and strengthen the area. Then you don't need to have to worry about touching up the paint either, win/win! :mexican wave:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
thanks for all the replies and ideas. I got sidetracked and didn't get a chance to take it apart over the weekend but with all the rain here in southern Ontario, i may be getting in to it today. just hope I don't open it up, its so tight right now some solvent cement may wick right in........
 

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Discussion Starter #12
well after removal the crack still seems to be very tight but unfortunately more are present.



so i will clean it up and try and epoxy a thin washer to the back side of both mounting holes, the other one has a small short crack but figure while doing the left side may as well do the right.

i had some plastic epoxy in my hand but was concerned about it holding the metal washer properly ......... so i just opted for some J-B Weld.


thanks for all the tips guys, i'll let you know how it turns out.
 

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My son's Piaggio scooter had a crack about 6 inches long up the centre of the plastic fender...

I used JB weld in the crack, then used my finger to smear it and press it into the crack from the underside, then put a couple of pieces of duct tape across the top to hold it while it set. It has been two weeks, it is holding strong and it looks like there was never a crack there.

I have to admit, I use JB weld for a lot of things and find it to be just about the best epoxy I can find.
 

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From a thread on ADVrider


Repairing and Working with ABS Plastics
Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) is a common thermoplastic (melts when heated) used to make light, rigid, molded products.
Personally, I find ABS to be one of the easiest plastics to work with as it is easy to build small structures with. eg. I built a mini dashboard for my KLR650 which houses my Voltmeter, Ammeter, 12 Volt outlet and two blinker repeaters and is fitted just behind the windshield.
ABS is easy to mold and bond together to create a strong and easily painted structure.
Sheets of ABS (usually grey in color) can be obtained from Hobby Stores at up to 1/8th inch thick.
If you want thicker sheets it is easy to bond layers together using Acetone as the solvent.
PS. In these days of re-cycling, manufacturers have to mark what plastic was used on the inside of the molding. This makes it much easier to identify the plastic type and how best to repair it.
In the case of the fairing on the newer KLR 650s, Kawasaki used ABS instead of the Polypropylene they used previously. Polypropylene tends to be far more durable for off-road motorcycle plastic parts.
ABS is easier to paint and to mold but cracks and shatters relatively easily which means that a fairly minor dropping of your newer KLR means an expensive replacement. Good for Kawasaki, not good for the KLRer.

Repairing ABS:
You will need:
Fine small paint brush
Small glass screw top container full of Acetone
Fine sandpaper 320 grit approx.
Small container for ABS Slurry (if required)
½ inch Scotch Tape
WARNING: ACETONE IS EXTREMELY FLAMMABLE – Keep away from flames and always work in a well ventilated area. It also removes the oils from your skin. Protect yourself appropriately.

It is important, if you drop your bike, to gather all of the pieces of broken plastic, as the broken pieces are easier to put together than trying to accurately cut new pieces to insert and to match the thickness of the original material.
So, as I mentioned earlier, Acetone is the solvent we will be using. Acetone dissolves the ABS and creates a strong bond.
Carefully piece together the broken fairing. I mean REALLY CAREFULLY !!!!
Carefully, clean all parts with a mild degreaser. I have found DAWN washing up detergent is a great de-greaser and is cheap.
Carefully inspect the fairing and find all of the cracks.
The goal is to align the parts so that there is no gap or step where the pieces meet. This is vitally important for a really good end result. You can use Scotch Tape to hold difficult pieces together.
Generally, I repair the cracks first and then add the loose pieces into the larger repaired structure.
However, always make sure that you can get the pieces to fit if you glue the cracked parts first.
Once you have the parts carefully aligned, and working from the inside, carefully apply the Acetone with the fine wooden handled brush to the inside of the crack and by capillary action the water thin Acetone will flow into the close fitting crack. Only apply small amounts of Acetone as a little goes a long way down a crack. The brush holds just enough without flooding the crack.
DO NOT FLOOD THE AREA WITH ACETONE.
After 1-2 minutes the join will be handleable.
Work along all cracks until the main structure is solid.
Next add the pieces that were broken off in the same way. Carefully align each piece and bond with Acetone from behind.
Why do I suggest bonding from behind? Acetone will damage the painted surfaces if applied directly to paint. Working from behind means that any damage to the paint on the inside can easily be covered with a couple of coats of paint (flat black for example)
If you did a good job, then the only visible evidence of the damage will be hair line cracks in the surface paint.

More dramatic repairs:
If the cracks you have are not close fitting you will have to make a “Slurry” of ABS dissolved in Acetone.
To make a slurry, take tiny pieces of ABS and dissolve them into Acetone. I usually use the Polypropylene cap from a Paint “Rattle” Can which holds just enough in the inner part of the cap. Note; it takes a while to dissolve the ABS in Acetone so be patient.
Apply Scotch Tape or Electricians Tape to the underside of the open crack to stop the slurry from falling through. The resulting “Soup’ can be painted into the cracks and built up layer by layer to fill the crack. Allow at least an hour between layers to allow the acetone to evaporate away before applying the next layer.
If there are major pieces missing, you will have to buy ABS sheet from a Model Hobby Store. Sometimes they have to order it in. Alternatively, you local Display Sign Company may have some.
You will have to cut (and mold) the sheet plastic to fit in the areas where the original plastic is missing.
It really does not matter what color ABS sheet you get is as you will have to re-paint the fairing after.
You can use a little Bondo to smooth out any minor mismatch. Don’t forget to roughen the ABS surface and to degrease prior to applying the Bondo. (Always roughen and degrease to remove finger oils and mold release agents)
Kinda makes you wish you had picked up all the broken pieces..huh?
Well guys I hope that helps avoid the costly expense of replacing the fairing.

Making Custom Parts:
ABS is extremely easy to work with and using solvents is easier than heat welding.
It is great to make things like mini-dashboards and switch mounts etc.
There ya go, now you know!!
 

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bigjohn, Great post, thanks for doing it!

Tpmk
 

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Repair

Ya, thanks! appreciate the info.
 

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Plastics source

And if you're looking for plastic supplies near Toronto, here's a good place to go:

plasticsworld.ca Online Plastics, Plastic Sheets, Plexiglass, Epoxy Resin, Fiberglass, Carbon Fiber - Plastic World (won't let me post proper URL)
 

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Drill the hole bigger so that there's no pressure from the screw to the sides of the hole (check and drill all the mounting holes). Then drill a small hole at the ends of all the cracks to remove the stress points at the ends of the cracks.
 
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