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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
fan doesnt come on? 06' model

Hi all,,got an 06',,and the rad fan didnt come on today{85-90 degrees outside} wondering what the part numbers are for the coolant sensor on head,,I located the radiator sensor on amazon,,and Im going to change the fan fuse,,coolant,,and dont really want to install on/off switch for fan,,and I dont have an ohm meter or anything like that. Just want to OEM it back to where it was. Any info would be great,,Thanks:surprise:
 

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This weekend it was in the mid 90's here in Michigan and mine never came on unless I stropped and let it idle a few minutes at stoplights. Where did your temp gauge needle get? Mine needs to get well over halfway up the scale before the fan ever kicks in.
 

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Short the lead to the radiator thermal switch to GROUND. The fan should activate. If it does not, you have an electrical connection (including fan fuse), fan relay (Generation 1), or fan motor problem.

Only after the test with an activated fan should the radiator thermal switch be questioned. Thermal switch test procedure in Service Manuals.

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More importantly, what does your TEMPERATURE GAUGE say? If it's not in, or very near, the RED ZONE, you don't need no stinkin' fan!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This weekend it was in the mid 90's here in Michigan and mine never came on unless I stropped and let it idle a few minutes at stoplights. Where did your temp gauge needle get? Mine needs to get well over halfway up the scale before the fan ever kicks in.
normally,, 80 degrees outside temp,, or less ,,fan would come on when needle was just past 1/2- 3/4 way on the gauge,,Im in livonia mi area,,so were having the same weather,,but the other day the needle almost went all the way to the right side of gauge,,and no fan came on,,so I shut it down till I can check fuse and other stuff,Thanks for the input
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Short the lead to the radiator thermal switch to GROUND. The fan should activate. If it does not, you have an electrical connection (including fan fuse), fan relay (Generation 1), or fan motor problem.

Only after the test with an activated fan should the radiator thermal switch be questioned. Thermal switch test procedure in Service Manuals.

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More importantly, what does your TEMPERATURE GAUGE say? If it's not in, or very near, the RED ZONE, you don't need no stinkin' fan!
ok,,good info thanks. 80 degrees outdoor temp or less,,it would come on when needle got past 1/2-3/4 on the gauge,,its been 90 degrees this week,,and the needle climbed to almost all the way to the right side of gauge,,and fan didnt come on,,so Ill try your test and see what happens. Thanks for all the info guys
 

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2wheel, Do the fan blades snag the cage anywheres? Or does it turn free? As suggested earlier, disconnect the wire from the switch at the bottom of the radiator and touch it to a cylinder head 'fin'. Then check the fuse behind the coolant reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
2wheel, Do the fan blades snag the cage anywheres? Or does it turn free? As suggested earlier, disconnect the wire from the switch at the bottom of the radiator and touch it to a cylinder head 'fin'. Then check the fuse behind the coolant reservoir.
ya know ,,I didnt even check that fan rotation,,Ill do that. Also would there be any advantage to putting in a 20 amp fuse,,instead of the oem 15 amp? thanks
 

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ya know ,,I didnt even check that fan rotation,,Ill do that. Also would there be any advantage to putting in a 20 amp fuse,,instead of the oem 15 amp? thanks
The main job of a fuse is to protect the wiring in its circuit. If you put in a fuse to handle more current than the wire then the wire is protecting the fuse and it will burn out before the fuse. You should find the real problem and fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
The main job of a fuse is to protect the wiring in its circuit. If you put in a fuse to handle more current than the wire then the wire is protecting the fuse and it will burn out before the fuse. You should find the real problem and fix it.
Got it. I pulled the fan fuse{ in white plastic holder,,zip tied to rad support} and its a 10 amp,,and it was fried! SSooo,,there was a x-tra inside the holder bx,,installed it,,lightly cleaned w/fine file,, the brass tabs, on fuse holder,,,and on the rad sensor tab just to clean them up a bit,,started it,,gauge needle got to just over 1/2 way and JOY!! THE FAN CAME ON!! and it ran for a minute or so and then shut off. So if there was a 10 amp in it,,than thats what should always go in there ,,right? Just wondering what may have caused the fuse to blow?? Didnt see any melted wires next to engine area? Just a footnote,,its a 06 w/over 40,000 on the clock,,12 year old bike,,and this is the 1st time Ive ever had this issue. KLR's are awsome IMO. Sure theres faster more high tech bikes out there,,but I still dig the 2 wheeled tractor. Thanks folks for the info,,2whl
 

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Some times we will never be sure what cause the fuse to blow. It could be that corrosion at the fuse insert points causes just enough extra heat to blow the fuse or maybe vibration weakened the fuse........ . We install the spare fuse and everything works until the next time and we find we now have no spare.

Sometimes we know exactly why a fuse blew because we install the replacement fuse and it blows causing us to then look for and find the short that caused the problem. Then of course we have no spare fuse.

I always carry at least two spare fuses of each size needed on the bike.
 

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Checking fuses seems sound maintenance procedure, to me.

Yes, 10-amp is specified.

A tip: At the risk of having some members run, screaming, from the website . . . replacing the 10-amp (OEM) headlight fuse with a 15-amp ain't a bad idea, IMHO, on a Generation 1. Sometimes, the HIGH/LOW switch gets electrically "stuck" between the beams, illuminates both simultaneously, blowing the fuse.

I await, "I ain't heerd never of THAT happening!" posts, and sound and well-intentioned warnings of overloading wires with oversize fuses, but . . . I personally make an exception, myself, for the possible transient condition of both high and low beams active.

YMMV!
 

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I make an exception to the "don't use a larger fuse than specified" for the Gen1 headlight switch as it's a known issue and the 15 amp replacement has proven itself over time. I wouldn't up the fuse size for the fan.

Dave
 
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