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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everyone,

The other night, when going home, the bike was acting a bit weird. The best way that I can explain it is, if you would pulse the break lightly and giving it gas at the same time making kind of a subtle rocking/swaying. (This is the best I could come up with.)

I checked a few things while on my drive to see if I can diagnose quickly and see what I could do when I got home.

RPM: No change at constant throttle.
Throttle Response: Good and no sticking.
Clutch: Release and engage, OK
Break: No issues, rolling down slight hill, gaining speed and momentum, no slowing down. Pulled over and checked if I had free movement when pushing it around.


My thoughts on the issue is either my clutch plates are worn, the doohickey was not done by the previous owner like he said it was or my breaks are actually applying some kind of force.

Any help on the subject is greatly appreciated.

Thank you in advance.
 

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I'll suggest an un-evenly worn drive chain & sprocket set to possibly be the cause of a 'slight surging' feeling.

Possibly a slightly too snug of chain adjustment on 'good' chain & sprocket set? Can you readily, easily lift the lower run of chain UP to Touch the rear tip of the rubber under-slider?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you pdwestman! That would make total sense. I had just recently adjusted the chain. I thought I had it dialed in but I will need to get it on the lift and check.

Hopefullly that's what it is.

Thank you
 

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Thank you pdwestman! That would make total sense. I had just recently adjusted the chain. I thought I had it dialed in but I will need to get it on the lift and check.

Hopefullly that's what it is.

Thank you
The KLR rear shock are usually topped out when on the side stand, unless lower linked or loaded with gear. So no real need to put on center lift.

I'll urge you to slip a phillips screwdriver between the rear sprocket teeth & chain and then roll the bike or wheel forward to 'suck' all the slack out of the axle to adjusters and tighten the rear axle nut, roll the wheel back & double check chain to slider.
Depending on which way one is pulling the big wrench the axle can shift during tightening, the screwdriver trick prevents axle shift during tightening of the axle.

Check your chain slack in several increments of tire rotation, some rear sprockets can be slightly out-of-round.
 

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With your “feeling weak” title I thought you meant engine power. I only mention this because my tank vent is giving me a little trouble. When I get lower in fuel I feel the faintest sensation of reduced power and response. My tank vent is also starting to squeal when low on fuel. It seems like I’m getting a slight vacuum in the tank. I probably caused it by overfilling and need to disassemble the vent for a cleaning.
 

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With your “feeling weak” title I thought you meant engine power. I only mention this because my tank vent is giving me a little trouble. When I get lower in fuel I feel the faintest sensation of reduced power and response. My tank vent is also starting to squeal when low on fuel. It seems like I’m getting a slight vacuum in the tank. I probably caused it by overfilling and need to disassemble the vent for a cleaning.
I don't think the level of fuel in the tank (90% or 10%) would affect a vent squeal or the vacuum in the tank. These things would be affected by the engine's fuel draw-down rate (how fast the fuel is drawn out and air drawn in). Any change in tank vacuum would actually happen more slowly at low fuel levels due to empty space above the fuel acting as vacuum reservoir.
 

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Regardless, it gets worse as the fuel level decreases. Maybe the fuel heats up more when there is less making it vaporize more and what I’m hearing is pressure and not vacuum.
 

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Regardless, it gets worse as the fuel level decreases. Maybe the fuel heats up more when there is less making it vaporize more and what I’m hearing is pressure and not vacuum.
Yes EricZ, that is exactly what I was about to explain.

I could hear the various fuel tanks venting in my showroom, in the winter time when the forced air furnace would warm them up.
 

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It would seem, though, that if the issue is a loss of power, and the cause might be a vacuum in the tank that inhibits fuel flow due to bad vent seals, that heated fuel vaporizing and causing pressure in the tank would not be the problem.

Wouldn't heated fuel that pressurizes the tank increase fuel flow?
 
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