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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After the last time I had a flat (big spike though the tire), I decided to learn how to do the repair myself and keep all the tools on hand that I need to do it.

The opportunity to test my skills arose this afternoon about 10 miles from home near a rest stop

I limped into the rest stop after determining that my tube would hold NO air (zilch, nada, zero). Parked next to a picnic table beneath a roof, I completed the repair in about an hour (I know, slowwwww). But, I had to stop and visit with many good Samaritans that stopped to inquire.:25: Apparently, to the untrained eye, a bike propped on the side stand and a 2x4 with the rear wheel removed looks like a major undertaking.

After thoughts:

  • The Slime mini-compressor worked great, although slowly; a reasonable compromise for the small size.
  • I've decided to look into a plastic compartmentalized container, like a Plano, to hold extra small parts.
  • Also searching for a better wrap for the wrenches.
  • I need to add another brace to prop the front end in case I get a flat on that end.
  • Gotta love YouTube tutorials!
 

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Congrats! Thankfully, I have not had to try my hand at that.
 

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TWR,

Looks like you have this issue handled very well. May I ask what tire have and what tools you used. The reason i ask is recently I replaced the Distanzia's on my 2005 KLR. Those tires are very thick and stiff and would have been a PITA if I was not using a tire machine to e and a lot of WD40. Not looking forward to a tire repair on the road.

Something like a Quick Jack will securely raise the front or rear wheel. I am sure there are other jacks that will do the same as the QJ.

I am looking for something to hold the Slime Pump and a spare tube. Considering using a Wolfman Enduro Tool Pack mounted where the emission hardware was.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I have a D606 on the rear, no rim locks.

The front is a Dunlop Enduro. I think this might me the older D606 front.

One more question: has anyone ever heard of a tire liner to help resist punctures? Something between the tire and tube (kevlar?) seems like it would be useful. I have seen this for bicycle tires.
 

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Congratulations! I'm sure it gave you a great sense of satisfaction to get on that thing and ride off with your repaired tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Congratulations! I'm sure it gave you a great sense of satisfaction to get on that thing and ride off with your repaired tire.
Absolutely! My wife was consoling me because my ride was cut short. I told her that the experience gained far outweighs the shorter ride. Being self-sufficient is it's own reward! :64a:
 

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This post just just reminded me I need to get my flat repair kit kicked up a notch. I need to get one of those compressors and I don't think the tire irons I have which also act as wrenches can remove the rear, and I know I don't have anything to remove the front axle.

Damn, now I just jinxed myself.
 

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I have a D606 on the rear, no rim locks.

The front is a Dunlop Enduro. I think this might me the older D606 front.

One more question: has anyone ever heard of a tire liner to help resist punctures? Something between the tire and tube (kevlar?) seems like it would be useful. I have seen this for bicycle tires.

IMHO any object sharp and stiff enough to go through a motorcycle tire won't be stopped by any kind of liner. Bullet proof vests have to have ceramic plates in them to stop knives.
 

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IMHO any object sharp and stiff enough to go through a motorcycle tire won't be stopped by any kind of liner. Bullet proof vests have to have ceramic plates in them to stop knives.
I would agree. Kevlar is some good stuff, but it will only do so much. As noted, it seems to be popular for bicycle tires but they're completely different from motorcycle tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What caused your flat this time? Did you repair the tube/tire with a kit? If so, what did you use?
This time, I caught a 1-1/2" staple right through one of the knobs. It was one of the thick type used for barbed wire fences.

I used Motion Pro spoons, Tusk bead holder, baby powder, slime patch kit, rubber cement, and a slime mini pump. The last section of bead was being stubborn to seat, so I squirted a bit of wd-40 on it. It popped into place with around 30 Lbs of pressure in the tube.

Additional thoughts:

  • I'm planning to add to my kit is a small quantity of rubbing alcohol for additional prepping on the patch area.
  • I'm also going to try making my own patches out of old inner tubes.
  • A couple of 2x4 wood blocks would be nice for protecting the rotor and keeping dirt out of the bearing when working on the wheel on the ground. It wasn't a big deal this time because I was on concrete beneath the picnic shelter.
 

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This time, I caught a 1-1/2" staple right through one of the knobs. It was one of the thick type used for barbed wire fences.

I used Motion Pro spoons, Tusk bead holder, baby powder, slime patch kit, rubber cement, and a slime mini pump. The last section of bead was being stubborn to seat, so I squirted a bit of wd-40 on it. It popped into place with around 30 Lbs of pressure in the tube.

Additional thoughts:

  • I'm planning to add to my kit is a small quantity of rubbing alcohol for additional prepping on the patch area.
  • I'm also going to try making my own patches out of old inner tubes.
  • A couple of 2x4 wood blocks would be nice for protecting the rotor and keeping dirt out of the bearing when working on the wheel on the ground. It wasn't a big deal this time because I was on concrete beneath the picnic shelter.
The alcohol for patch prep is a great idea. I think I'll incorporate that into my kit. Thanks for sharing the details of your repair and what you used.

Keeping the wheel up off the ground to protect the rotor and bearings is also a wise thing to consider.
 

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You might look into an enduro trail stand. They're made local. My wife bought one for me at our last big ride from Steve.

My tire repair kit fits in my pocket. It's called a cell phone. Call the wife and tell her to bring the trailer. LOL It hasn't happened yet, but I'm sure it will one day and I'll wish I had my tools to do it myself. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Where'd you get the 2x4? Don't tell me you carry one around.
Why wouldn't I carry one around??? It's a short piece of 2x4 that fits in the tool kit along with the tube and other things mentioned in previous posts. Beats the heck out of laying the bike on the ground (welded footpegs; center stand not an option).
 

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I'm in and up on tire fixin... got a flat three times in a row, so my learn curve was practically straight up...lol You are right. Need the right tools. Valve stem remover, patches, spoons (x3), pump, tube..... I did use one of those spoon/wrench combos and found that it was too long to keep the wedge under the brake disc.....Unless you are looking at a shorter version? That knowledge came in handy as a buddy of mine found a nail out in the middle of absolutely nowhere... Got him on the trail in an hour. It wasn't a bum deal. Learning how to mechanic trail side is priceless and we both were grateful.
 

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Why wouldn't I carry one around??? It's a short piece of 2x4 that fits in the tool kit along with the tube and other things mentioned in previous posts. Beats the heck out of laying the bike on the ground (welded footpegs; center stand not an option).
Ok, ok, give me more details. How long, and where do you keep it?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Not sure of the exact length, but it's long enough to prop under the right side of the swing arm, just enough to keep the tire/wheel about 1" off the ground. This length will probably vary depending on the size and type of tire you run.

I keep it in an old tank bag, zip-tied in place in front of the action packer top case.





 
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