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FWIW, some entertainment recommendations for discerning members:

Reading: This Kind Of War: The Classic Military History Of The Korean War - T.R. Fehrenbach. The most engrossing military history book I've ever read.

Movies: Gold Diggers of 1933.


What We Do In The Shadows


Television: TCM's Noir Alley. Airs late Saturday night and again Sunday morning.

 

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Noir Alley, highly recommended! Some of Hollywood's best.

"Hollywood's the kind of town where they stick a knife in your back and then have you arrested for carrying a concealed weapon." -Philip Marlowe
 

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I recently watched "He Walked By Night." You guys seen that one?
Indeed, that's a good one. I was surprised on this morning's NA Murder My Sweet when Phillip Marlowe was played by Dick Powell, one of the stars of Gold Diggers of 1933 I recommended above. I'd never seen it. He's not nearly as good a Marlow as Bogart.
 

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I haven't watched any of the Bogart - Marlowe films. Where do you recommend one start?
I might be forgetting others, but the only one I can think of is The Big Sleep.

Robert Mitchum was also a good Marlowe.
 

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I haven't watched any of the Bogart - Marlowe films. Where do you recommend one start?


The Big Sleep, for sure. You get Lauren Bacall in the bargain.

And for more Bogie and Bacall, To Have and Have Not.

 

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Robert Mitchum was also a good Marlowe.
That I do want to see. I watched Friends of Edddy Coyle recently, too, and was reminded that Mitchum's the shit. And now that I'm thinking about it, not having any of his Marlowe films on hand until I get to the movie store, I think I'll watch Night of the Hunter this evening…
 

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When I was in the Army T.R. Fehrenbach signed a copy of that book for me. Korea was my home away from home. Except for the times on the DMZ I loved it there. Not enough books or movies on that war.
 

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When I was in the Army T.R. Fehrenbach signed a copy of that book for me. Korea was my home away from home. Except for the times on the DMZ I loved it there. Not enough books or movies on that war.
Wow! I'm impressed! That is way too cool. I spent 4-1/2 years in Korea when I was in the Army. I got hooked on Korean War history watching all the little war history/info bites on AFKN and there were several Korean War veterans I used to talk to all the time in my hometown.

I was once doing a test flight in a Black Hawk helicopter and the pilots had to do a procedure that required minimum crew, meaning just them. They dropped me off on a rather remote and high ridge/mountaintop a few miles away from Songnam, which is basically a suburb Southeast of Seoul where I was stationed.

I was wandering around waiting for them to come back and get me when I noticed some unusual, long indentations in the ground. It finally dawned on me that they were the remnants of fighting positions and, considering the fact that most Koreans don't just go wandering around remote areas hiking and hunting like Americans do, it struck me that I might have been the first person there since they cleaned up whatever mess happened on that site 40 years ago (1993 at the time).
 

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Wow! I'm impressed! That is way too cool. I spent 4-1/2 years in Korea when I was in the Army. I got hooked on Korean War history watching all the little war history/info bites on AFKN and there were several Korean War veterans I used to talk to all the time in my hometown.

I was once doing a test flight in a Black Hawk helicopter and the pilots had to do a procedure that required minimum crew, meaning just them. They dropped me off on a rather remote and high ridge/mountaintop a few miles away from Songnam, which is basically a suburb Southeast of Seoul where I was stationed.

I was wandering around waiting for them to come back and get me when I noticed some unusual, long indentations in the ground. It finally dawned on me that they were the remnants of fighting positions and, considering the fact that most Koreans don't just go wandering around remote areas hiking and hunting like Americans do, it struck me that I might have been the first person there since they cleaned up whatever mess happened on that site 40 years ago (1993 at the time).
Sounds like we both spent about the same amount of time there. I was there just short of 5 yrs spread out over two separate extended tours. I too am fascinated with that war. The first tour was with a Combat Engineer Bn at Camp Humphreys. I was only 18 and didn't do much but drink and screw as many women as possible. My second tour was at Camp Red Cloud in Uijongbu where I was assigned on the Commanding General's staff at the Combined Field Army ROK/US. Not to be confused with KATUSA's these were regular ROK troops and US.
LTG William Carpenter was the boss and I flew with him lots of times going all over up north visiting the ROK units in the command. One day we ended up on Hill 235 or more famously known as Gloster Hill. Google it as some very cool shit went down there. We had a historian from somewhere in Korea telling the tale of the battle that took place there where a few hundred British held off tens of thousands of screaming Chinese for two days. That was probably the strangest feeling I ever felt as we walked and crawled around that hill noting where certain individuals were killed. If you looked carefully, you can still see craters from Mortars and field artillery and where the foxholes were.
Prior to that assignment I was stationed further south at Camp Carrol as an operations Sgt. Just up the road from there was Hill 303 where during a battle near the Naktong River the N. Koreans captured then executed a bunch of GI's. I am amazed at how those guys fought there. For those who have never been there it's over 70% mountains so imagine humping your way up and down mountains constantly while fighting. Oh, did I mention cold as hell in winter and steaming hot in summer too? Still it was a great place to grow up. Wish I could go do it all over again.. Getting old sucks.
 

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Sounds like we both spent about the same amount of time there. I was there just short of 5 yrs spread out over two separate extended tours. I too am fascinated with that war. The first tour was with a Combat Engineer Bn at Camp Humphreys. I was only 18 and didn't do much but drink and screw as many women as possible. My second tour was at Camp Red Cloud in Uijongbu where I was assigned on the Commanding General's staff at the Combined Field Army ROK/US. Not to be confused with KATUSA's these were regular ROK troops and US.
LTG William Carpenter was the boss and I flew with him lots of times going all over up north visiting the ROK units in the command. One day we ended up on Hill 235 or more famously known as Gloster Hill. Google it as some very cool shit went down there. We had a historian from somewhere in Korea telling the tale of the battle that took place there where a few hundred British held off tens of thousands of screaming Chinese for two days. That was probably the strangest feeling I ever felt as we walked and crawled around that hill noting where certain individuals were killed. If you looked carefully, you can still see craters from Mortars and field artillery and where the foxholes were.
Prior to that assignment I was stationed further south at Camp Carrol as an operations Sgt. Just up the road from there was Hill 303 where during a battle near the Naktong River the N. Koreans captured then executed a bunch of GI's. I am amazed at how those guys fought there. For those who have never been there it's over 70% mountains so imagine humping your way up and down mountains constantly while fighting. Oh, did I mention cold as hell in winter and steaming hot in summer too? Still it was a great place to grow up. Wish I could go do it all over again.. Getting old sucks.
Wow. What an incredible opportunity you had to see those places in person with a historian/guide.

I was there from 1990 to 1994 and was in the 377th Medical Company (Dustoff) stationed at K16 in Songnam for a couple of years then did a couple of years at Humphreys. From what I see on the net, Humphreys is like a small city now compared to what it was when I was there and I heard a lot of the little camps up around TDC are no more.

Yeah, I can't imagine moving around and fighting in that terrain. It was most assuredly godawful. I've told people for a long time the coldest I've ever been was in Korea. No surprise the majority of Korean war vets I knew, although they led pretty normal lives, were raging alcoholics who truly lived up to the stereotype of "they never talked about it." Most of them aren't around anymore.
 

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Wow. What an incredible opportunity you had to see those places in person with a historian/guide.

I was there from 1990 to 1994 and was in the 377th Medical Company (Dustoff) stationed at K16 in Songnam for a couple of years then did a couple of years at Humphreys. From what I see on the net, Humphreys is like a small city now compared to what it was when I was there and I heard a lot of the little camps up around TDC are no more.

Yeah, I can't imagine moving around and fighting in that terrain. It was most assuredly godawful. I've told people for a long time the coldest I've ever been was in Korea. No surprise the majority of Korean war vets I knew, although they led pretty normal lives, were raging alcoholics who truly lived up to the stereotype of "they never talked about it." Most of them aren't around anymore.
I was in Anjongri 1979-81.
I got there in July 79 and in Oct President Park was assassinated in a coup in Seoul. We thought the war was going to resume, but all it did was keep us out of the nightclubs for a week or so. When I was there Anjongri was just the ville. I went back in 2006 and while driving down from Incheon, It seemed like the high rise buildings stretched from Seoul all the way to K6. Anjongri is now a friggin city full of 20 story apartment buildings. Was hard to tell I ever left Seoul. When I was there it was all farms and rice paddies. Today it's wall to wall city.
 

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I was in Anjongri 1979-81.
I got there in July 79 and in Oct President Park was assassinated in a coup in Seoul. We thought the war was going to resume, but all it did was keep us out of the nightclubs for a week or so. When I was there Anjongri was just the ville. I went back in 2006 and while driving down from Incheon, It seemed like the high rise buildings stretched from Seoul all the way to K6. Anjongri is now a friggin city full of 20 story apartment buildings. Was hard to tell I ever left Seoul. When I was there it was all farms and rice paddies. Today it's wall to wall city.
Sounds like that area was pretty much the same during both our time frames. I saw the beginnings of that buildup as I remember flying from Humphreys to Seoul and seeing large tracts of land on the outskirts of Seoul where they were constructing maybe fifty of those 20-story apartment buildings at the same time. I recall being amazed at construction of that magnitude. When I was there, there was nothing around Anjongri, nothing between there and Pyongtoek, nothing between Pyongtoek and Osan and lots of empty land between there and Seoul.

Korea was the only place I ever went to "The Field" basically in the middle of a town where in the morning and afternoon we'd have to cease operations so hundreds of schoolkids, all dressed alike and carrying their little backpacks, could pass through our area on their way to and from school. That was always a hoot.
 

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Sounds like that area was pretty much the same during both our time frames. I saw the beginnings of that buildup as I remember flying from Humphreys to Seoul and seeing large tracts of land on the outskirts of Seoul where they were constructing maybe fifty of those 20-story apartment buildings at the same time. I recall being amazed at construction of that magnitude. When I was there, there was nothing around Anjongri, nothing between there and Pyongtoek, nothing between Pyongtoek and Osan and lots of empty land between there and Seoul.

Korea was the only place I ever went to "The Field" basically in the middle of a town where in the morning and afternoon we'd have to cease operations so hundreds of schoolkids, all dressed alike and carrying their little backpacks, could pass through our area on their way to and from school. That was always a hoot.
These days Anjongri , Pyongtaek and Osan have basically nearly merged as one . Difficult to tell when your leaving Seoul. It's like the city has stretched all the way south to Suweon. The subway now runs from Tongducheon all the way down to Taejeon and branches off in between. The buildup would make an invasion from the north impossible to sustain. As soon as N. Korea opens up with those 12,000+ Howitzers stationed along the border, they will fill the route south with impassable rubble. The buildup is as much tactical as it is economics. The Land of the Morning Calm has turned into a 24/7 Asian version of New York City.
 

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I haven't watched any of the Bogart - Marlowe films. Where do you recommend one start?
Not Marlowe, but . . . Sam Spade:

Consider, "The Maltese Falcon."

(And Tom; no need to mention the sequel, "The Tequila Mockingbird!" )

Maltese Falcon has not only Bogart (as private eye Sam Spade), but . . . Mary Astor, Peter Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet, Elisha Cook, Jr. . . . the film noir of all film noirs!

And, not so noir, perhaps, but . . . what about, "Casablanca?" Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Paul Henreid, Dooley Wilson ("You Must Remember This"), and . . . Lorre and Greenstreet, together again!

As Bogart says to Rains (who, previously, was shocked, SHOCKED, to learn gambling took place in Bogart's club, as a croupier delivered him his winnings) in the final scene:

"This could be the start of a beautiful friendship!"
 

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planalp and PaddyD; agree--far too little attention given the Korean "Police Action," before, during, or now, "after" the armistice.

The assassination of the South Korean president's wife, the, "Tree-Cutting Incident" where two American Army officers were killed . . . essentially, neglected history; even the "Pueblo" incident remains ignored today.

Today, few have any AWARENESS of the Korean situation, other than what's on TV about the strategic situation. And, if people ain't SEEN the DMZ and environs, I've found no way to convey an effective impression with words. I've TRIED to explain, "Propaganda Village," and its North Korean flag, big enough to cover a whole football field; hopeless task!

"If we do not understand history, we are doomed to repeat it," or words to that effect.

[/Political Rant]
 

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You had me going with The Tequila Mockingbird, ha! Closest thing I could find on IDB was an episode from Get Smart…

I saw Casablanca fairly recently, but it's been a while for The Maltese Falcon… perhaps time for a revisit.
 
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