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Discussion Starter #1
KLR 2014. Looking forward for this upgrade. Seen some brands out there like EBC and others. Any experience with it ? A larger rotor will provide better cooling and longer operative brakes soecially when hard braking or constant use in steep off road winding and dangerous roads or any situation demanding hard usage. Basically I see kits come with rotor and caliper bracket. The 2014 caliper works fine (heard older models upgrade to better caliper).
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Well. Today I got the Gaffer kit. Comes with rotor, pads, caliper adaptor and steel braided brake line.
 

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The slight increase in rotor radius should provide a corresponding improvement in stopping force (increased torque through rotor). Stainless steel brake line wrappings will provide sharper, crisper caliper piston response.

Modest improvement, IMHO; however . . . a modest braking improvement can result in a major safety improvement.

FULL DISCLOSURE: EBC 320-mm front rotor, wrapped front brake line, Galfer Green pads; dramatically improved Generation 1 braking.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes. I understand it is an improvement, and modest yet real. Where I think this improvement is huge is when going down hill, or using brakes continuously or hard as in fast cornering ( or slow cornering in treacherous roads and inclement weather, yet long and repetitive,) to the point of overheating the rotors and loosing efficiency. Larger rotors will allow much more efficiency of brakes under all conditons, and the effici9ency curve gets improved substantially.
 

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Maybe so. Fortunately, I have never "lost efficiency" from overheating disk brakes, as far as I can tell. Able to lock front wheel throughout a ride. An advantage of disk brakes remains fade-resistance, unlike drum brakes (where thermally-expanding drums lose contact with internally-expanding brake shoes).

Then again, I've never ridden a KLR650 in competition, or descended steep, lengthy slopes under time pressure.

Regardless, the increased stopping force of an oversize disk remains directly proportional to the increase in disk radius, and steel-wrapped brake lines seem palpably more responsive than rubber ones. Sound upgrades, IMHO.
 

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Taiwanese 320mm Rotor

Has anyone tried these Taiwanese rotors with any success?

Sorry they're listed on eBay but I can't post the url here because I'm not qualified yet. Apparently, you have to have 15 posts before you can include an url.
 

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Has anyone tried these Taiwanese rotors with any success?

Sorry they're listed on eBay but I can't post the url here because I'm not qualified yet. Apparently, you have to have 15 posts before you can include an url.
While you wait to achieve full posting status, you can FAKE IT!

As in, "k l r f o r u m . c o m" for the URL to this website.

I think such a practice would elude the auto-censorship programming.

Even so, without direct experience, couldn't evaluate any Taiwan rotors. While the established brands (Galfer, etc.) may seem over-priced, you may get what you pay for; or . . . the Taiwanese products may be equal in quality and a great bargain.
 

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I gotta say, I'm not seeing the need for upgraded brakes on the klr. I just don't get it I guess. I've ridden tons of bikes. From Harleys to sportbikes. The klr stops way better than any cruiser I've ever ridden. And though it may not stop like a liter bike, it not accelerating like one neither. Nor does it have the inverted front forks, 17 inch cast wheel with z rated rubber, and fully adjustable front suspension. Any stronger of a front brake imo would result in more fork flex, brake dive, and added force to a knobby tire with regard to traction. Again just my thoughts after riding various bikes. I just feel the twin piston caliper with the large stepped rotor is adequate while the twin piston in the rear is nice.
 

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OK, retyping had a glitch....augh!!!!!

OK, to get the best KLR brakes I know of...here are my recomondations.
Buy the 320 disc with it's adapter plate, I suggest the most expensive EBC one, but many have had success with the cheaper versions, now get stainless steel line, now go to fleabay and look for a V-Strom front caliper 2005 ish, buy a set if you can cheap, they shouldn't need rebuilding imho. If you can't get a set then just the left is good. To mount the caliper to the adapter plate is a simple adapter plate to match the two together, easy flat steel or Alluminium plate, it is easy...now use the SSline, it all bolts together, to your stock master. IF you want to go to the next stage, buy a 2005ish again CBR600RR or CBR1000RR master, it bolts on and onto the same line. It is completely adjustable for gravel/dirt riding as well as full on street riding. Now if you bought a set of caliers you install the right on on the back, a simple grinding of the mounting plate and redrilling the top hole will mount it. The expensive part will be getting a new SS line made up because the stock one if I remember correctly is too short.
I never in a million years thought you would need better rear brakes on a KLR but the differance is amazing! You do not need to apply as much pressure and you can feel the brake far better with this set up.
I have not seen or heard of a better braking sytem yet on a KLR. I have as close to street bike braking as I can imagine......it's fantastic!!!!
OH I also use the cheapest soft pads I can find and they are like $14 a pair for this set up!
 
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