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Discussion Starter #1
Any ideas on what is causing this wear pattern on my Front tire?
Duro HF903 90/90-21 ( Just over 2,000 miles and balance looks good.)
Air pressure maintained at 21psi
My rear ( Duro HF 904 ) has over 4,000 miles, and shows even wear. Still lots of depth.
I can't detect any movement in front head bearings, and side-to-side movement is smooth.
No damage to rim.




The ramp switches sides on every other block, and only in center blocks. Sides are wearing normally.

I'm going to take it in today for dealer inspection, but though I'd check here for ideas.
 

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Cupping seems more apparent on knobbies. Heavy braking makes it worse.
 

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Larry31,
THE Owner Manual is INCORRECT!!!!!

Never run LESS than 28 PSI in the Front tire on Pavement!!!!

When you or the pavement 'pushes' on the Center of the Front tire, the Surrounding tread blocks 'FLEX' towards the 'Point' of contact!

Your front tire is literally 'chewing' at the pavement.

Prove it to yourself, with an 'un-mounted' dirt knobby!
Push on the Center Knob, watch the surrounding Knobs 'Flex' towards the point of contact.

I ALWAYS run, or set-up a dirt bike / dual-sport bike, with 2 MORE PSI in the SKINNY Front tire than the 'fatter' Rear tire, up to MAX PSI. (depending on rider weight and Load.)

The front tires, are always, 'driven'. Not drive and driven as a rear tire.
Cupping of the Front Tire is Absolutely 'Normal', some tires are worse than others.

Reduce the 'cupping' by increasing the air pressure.
Most of the bike weight and rider/load weight is transferred to the FRONT tire during 'proper' braking, yes?
The Front tire NEEDS more air than the rear!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Tires

Larry31,
THE Owner Manual is INCORRECT!!!!!

Never run LESS than 28 PSI in the Front tire on Pavement!!!!

When you or the pavement 'pushes' on the Center of the Front tire, the Surrounding tread blocks 'FLEX' towards the 'Point' of contact!

Your front tire is literally 'chewing' at the pavement.

Prove it to yourself, with an 'un-mounted' dirt knobby!
Push on the Center Knob, watch the surrounding Knobs 'Flex' towards the point of contact.

I ALWAYS run, or set-up a dirt bike / dual-sport bike, with 2 MORE PSI in the SKINNY Front tire than the 'fatter' Rear tire, up to MAX PSI. (depending on rider weight and Load.)

The front tires, are always, 'driven'. Not drive and driven as a rear tire.
Cupping of the Front Tire is Absolutely 'Normal', some tires are worse than others.

Reduce the 'cupping' by increasing the air pressure.
Most of the bike weight and rider/load weight is transferred to the FRONT tire during 'proper' braking, yes?
The Front tire NEEDS more air than the rear!!!!!!!!!!!!
Thanks! That's what my local Kawasaki Service Mgr. said as well.
I had increased my pressure to 25. I'll try 28 as you suggested. Not sure how it will perform on gravel. I don't take it into real rough stuff. I have my little NX250 for that, and as I age, I don't heal as fast.

I'm going to try a different tread pattern on my next tire. Maybe a Kenda K270?
 

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You can always air-down your tire when you hit gravel. I think I run 32 in my front on the pavement.
 

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Excellent info westman! Thanks

larry I would stay away from the 270 front. Its sketchy. The shinko 244 and 705 are good.
 

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Excellent info westman! Thanks

larry I would stay away from the 270 front. Its sketchy. The shinko 244 and 705 are good.
My experience is the opposite. I have gone through about 10 sets of Kenda k270 front and rear with good luck. Decided to try a cheaper Shinko 244 on the rear. It chunked off 9 center knobs between Houston and Memphis (600 miles) on the highway. They replaced it with another Shinko 244 and that one chunked 4 center knobbies in the first 400 miles getting home and I was very careful with pressure and speed on that one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Airing down

You can always air-down your tire when you hit gravel. I think I run 32 in my front on the pavement.
I know it's done frequently, but in my kind of driving, I'd rather not mess around with constant changing air.

Typically I ride 40 - 50 miles, then explore alternating pavement and gravel with some mild technical stuff mixed in. Then another 40 - 50 miles on paved highway back home. If I rode only once highway, then off road, it might be worth it. I'm always mixing my road surfaces during a days ride.
 

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Larry31,
I'm about 165lbs in full gear and tool belt. I ride a 1987 -A1, 'light bike', haha.
White does 'look' light!

28-30 psi in the front and 26-28 psi in the rear has served me well on all roads. I, Air up for luggage or if my wife rides. Up to MAX on both ends.

I Do Not air down, because I hate to air-up!
I've led or chased 'dirtier' bikes, all over Wyoming.
I've led or chased 'streetier' bikes all over Wyoming.
I've ridden the 'high mountain dirt' passes in Colorado, and then rode home.

Up to 16,000 miles on a front Avon Gripster. 8200-11,000 miles on a rear Gripster. Yes, I will ride the rear, til bald in the center.

Cut through the center of your old tire, when you take it OFF.
See how 'little or much' safety margin is BUILT IN!
Some have more than others! Not all tires are created Equal!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Air in tires

This is not motorcycle related, but it is tire related.

Story from my youth: ( 15 years old )
Buddy & I were messing around with his beat-up chevy ( about 1932? )
We were in an old grassy field, and at bottom of a low spot, next to stone wall.
No other way out but "up".
Getting down there was easy, but when we tried to drive up the slope... The bald tires would just spin on the wet grass!
We tried at least 4 - 5 times, with no luck. I had remembered some tall stories from "the old guys" sitting around swapping tall tails.
I told my buddy to let a little air out of the rear tires. He made them soft enough to be about 2" to the rims.
First try up was a success!
 

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I had some odd wear on a front kenda k270 aired up to 21 while riding heavy on a klr up from Mexico to Canada on the divide route when I stopped in for a rear tire at Paul's shop, Lander Kawasaki in WY. He gave me the same advice he is giving here and I continued on with a new gripster on the rear at 36 and aired up the front to 28 per his sage advice. Finished out the remaining trail to Banff and the highway home to kc without having to adjust air. Worked great. Was a bit squirrelly on trail but never unsafe. Fantastic on the highway. Thanks Paul.
 
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