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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi folks!

I just replaced the spark plug to my 2018 KLR 650 and when I disconnected the gas lines of the Vapor Recovery System from the back of the tank I did not mark which hose went where. I thought I reconnected them right but when I started the motorcycle it went on for a minute kind of rough and then died.
I thought that maybe I switched the hoses and flipped them, but the motorcycle does not run anymore.
I tried several times and won't start. The spark plugs (both the new and the old ones) is sparking so I assume I messed up the hoses.
In the back of the tank there are two hoses going to the fuel pump. The right one has a red dot and the left one has a blue dot. Looking at the gas pump it looks like the blue hose should connect to the top of the fuel pump and the red one to the side (there is a red dot on the side attachment of the pump that says take).
I can send pictures if needed.
I finally found a diagram online and I think that they are connected right now, but the motorcycle won't start.
What happened if I connected them wrong?
Any way you guys out there can help me?
I feel pretty useless now...
Thanks!
 

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Did you disconnect the fuel and vacuum lines at the petcock?

If so, perhaps you have the fuel and vacuum lines reversed?

The nipple that's pointing down on the petcock is the fuel connection and the other nipple is for the vacuum line.

Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Jason
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question!

I disconnected the hoses only from the tank, and probably switched them when reconnecting them.
What are the consequences of doing that?
 

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Could you have maybe loaded the EPA canister with raw fuel? If you have a manual I’m fairly certain the procedure for clearing it is in there.

Dick
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you Dick!

I have a shitty manual that I found online and I need to get a proper one.
The diagram in my manual was wrong and I guess made me switch the hoses.

I will search online (or in this forum) how to clear the EPA canister and I will definitely order a proper manual.

If anybody is willing to share quick instructions on how to clear the EPA canister, I would greatly appreciate.
Thank you all!
 

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Have you tried removing the canister and drain it into a suitable container? There must be a way to purge that canister.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah, I saw that, but I live in California and would like not to mess with it yet....
Thanks!
 

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A couple of things to check:

  • Make sure you're getting fuel to the carburetor
  • Confirm that all vacuum lines are connected
  • Verify that you're getting spark at the spark plug
Jason
 

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A couple of things to check:

  • Make sure you're getting fuel to the carburetor
  • Confirm that all vacuum lines are connected
  • Verify that you're getting spark at the spark plug
Jason
Jason, I believe that the OP is referring to the 2 hoses & nipples under the tongue of the seat, which go to the EVAP System.

I think it is Blue hose to the most centered nipple & Red hose to the Right side nipple. The Red hose is attached to the SIDE of the EVAP vacuum Pump.
 

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Jason, I believe that the OP is referring to the 2 hoses & nipples under the tongue of the seat, which go to the EVAP System.

I think it is Blue hose to the most centered nipple & Red hose to the Right side nipple. The Red hose is attached to the SIDE of the EVAP vacuum Pump.


Indeed, he is most definitely referring to the 2 hoses under the seat that go to the EVAP system. But he now has a hose diagram and claims to have them connected correctly, but the bike still does not run.

So, that suggests something else is wrong, hence my aforementioned three areas to check.

Jason
 

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I'm an old duffer and I can't think clearly without a picture.

Here is an ugly markup -NB, It doesn't show the Secondary Air Valve (AIS).

 

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I'm an old duffer and I can't think clearly without a picture.

Here is an ugly markup -NB, It doesn't show the Secondary Air Valve (AIS).

That's a great diagram!

Perhaps OP can verify his connections are correct by referring to this diagram.

Jason
 

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And on the carb, in the following pic:
- the gray hose towards the bottom is the fuel feed from petcock
- pink hose towards top is the atmospheric vent
- smaller black hose if the vacuum port tap the connects to the vacuum operate petcock

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi guys:
first of all thank you everybody for taking your time and trying to help me. I really appreciated it.
It turned out it was much simpler than I thought.
The red and blue hose were in the right spots.
I was kind of in hurry and being sloppy and I forgot to reattach the hose in the picture.
Today with a fresh mind and time in my hand it took my 3 minutes to find it.
The bike runs great!

Thank you all and be safe riding...
 

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Not to thread jack but I always wondered what originally went in the emissions canister bracket. After looking at your link I found out. I guess someone at some point took the California crap off. I am guessing that no CHP will be familiar enough with a gen 1 KLR to know the difference and no deputy will care. I will probably put a tool kit there.
 

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CA emission control systems for Gen-1 and Gen-2 are very similar. Although the Gen-2 charcoal canister had a different shape, the layout and hoses were virtually identical. Both systems have a small pump unit (sometimes referred to as fuel/vapor separator). The pump is powered by vacuum fluctuations from the carb.

Gen-1 bikes had a T in the vac line to feed the suck (low pressure) to the vac operated petcock and also to the pump. With the Gen-2 bikes, the T was built into the brass spigot on the carb itself.

Here's the Gen-1 emissions diagram with sparkly colors.


In CA, motorcycles have not historically been subject to smog inspection. Other states which do have smog testing are typically limited to sniffing the tail-pipe (AZ used to do this, but not sure about current smog tests). The physical inspect and matching of OEM parts and pieces and connections is probably not worth the investment (too many variations in brands, models, and CA vs FED specs). This is not to say the regulators cannot/will not inspect your hoses, just that this is too complex (images and diagrams for 10-15 manufactuers and 250 unique model years per each) and too little reward in terms of reduction of un-burned hydrocarbons.

But odds are CA and the Feds will likely brow-beat the manufacturers into moving their platforms to closed loop and computer controlled (computer controlled injection, O2 sensors, and a catalytic converter in the tailpipe). At least until we outlaw hydrocarbon fueled internal combustion engines and move to hydrogen fueled and/or all electric.
 
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