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I eyeball my alignment, but in a very precise way. Get bike on center stand. Center front wheel so that it lines straight down the center of the rear wheel, when sighted from laying on the ground in front of the bike. Rotate front wheel 180 degrees and recheck it. Then move your eye from the centerline off to one side, to sight down the front and back edges of the rear tire. then do the other side. If you move the same amount to sight the edges of the rear tire, then the rear wheel is centered. If not, then adjust one adjuster to get it so.

Your front and rear wheels are now aligned. Use paint to Mark the position of the adjuster screws and nuts for future reference.
 

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Dave also recommends correct rear suspension setup. That’s important too. In my case, changing the sag of the rear suspension throughout its range made no difference in my bike. BUT, my bike already has a Touratech multi-adjustable rear shock on it, not the stock shock, so it may make more difference for the stock setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
@samuel , I will try the string method next as eyeballing made an improvement, string should get it perfect. Thanks, I never thought of doing it that way.

@DPelletier , I agree it's not the fender as it's a polisport. The only thing on the bike is me and a light backpack so it's not loading. The tires are new and rear has been balanced. The front has a single weight? On one spoke so I'm guessing that is a balance weight?
My head bearings are smooth and don't have play although they are easy to move so I will address that. I will begin setting suspension in a day or two as it does feel a tad soft.

As a side note, I just installed a set of tusk crash bars to protect all that new plastic. It's midnight here but I feel like I need to take her for a ride, at least a short one. Anyhow, I noticed the bars are not centered, the right side sticks out 2.5" off the plastic and the left only about 1". Is this normal? If not, does anyone know how to adjust this other than bending the bars? Thanks for all the help yall.
 

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spokes all tight?
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Update:
I took an 80 mile 50/50 dirt/street ride today with no wobble. I got up to 70 quite a few times and it seems pretty stable. Winds were pretty low too so that helps. So eyeballing alignment instead of using the tick marks in the swing arm made a noticable improvement. The only thing I have done since then is increase my preload in the rear from 1 to 1.5 and changed the damper from 1 turn to 2. I ride with me, my gear and a backpack, maybe 215-230 lb total.

I will add though that my steering head bearings have no play but they turn very easy. I think I will preload them a bit as suggested but it does not seem to have been causing the wobble.

Thanks to everyone for the help.
 

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In my experience you DO NOT preload the bearings. They must turn with no perceptible resistance. Otherwise, the bike will tend to keep falling into a turn when you initiate it. Trust me, you don’t want that feeling. The bearings should turn absolutely smoothly with no “notchiness”.

You are correct that the steering bearing adjustment has almost no influence on the high speed weave.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
In my experience you DO NOT preload the bearings. They must turn with no perceptible resistance. Otherwise, the bike will tend to keep falling into a turn when you initiate it. Trust me, you don’t want that feeling. The bearings should turn absolutely smoothly with no “notchiness”.

You are correct that the steering bearing adjustment has almost no influence on the high speed weave.
Ok, maybe I will leave them alone as they are smooth and have no noticable play.
 

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It must be "wobble week" .....anyhow, my standard post on the subject:

Way too many people think that addressing the symptoms by dealing with handguards, fenders, fork braces, etc. are the answer rather than dealing with the real issue which is related to suspension setup and loading. I'm not convinced that the KLR is any more susceptible to instability than any other bike with long travel, lightly damped suspension and the Owner's have a propensity for severe and uneven loading.



There are some problems that need to be checked;

- bad/lose head bearings

- condition of wheel bearings and suspension bushings

- wheel and tire condition and appropriate tire pressures.



.....beyond that, It's settings;

- proper sag settings and adequate damping

- proper bike loading

- avoiding inappropriately un-aerodynamic loads



addressing the symptoms rather than the cause can help but IMO shouldn't be done until all the aforementioned items are checked and corrected if necessary. Nonetheless these can help stability;



- fork brace

- smaller fender or lowered fender (I use a polisport as I hate both the supermoto and low mounted fenders)

- consider tank bags instead of putting everything in huge panniers which affects both weight loading and aerodynamics.





My 2001 had some high speed issues that went away as soon as the sag was set properly....and after my Cogent suspension was installed, both my KLR's have been rock steady.....even with full knobbies and low tire pressures (20 - 22PSI). Lastly, as others have mentioned, the rider also plays a part; keep a relaxed light grip on the bars and don't tighten up. Changing your position (move forward/lean forward) can help too.



2 cents,

Dave

Got a pic of your fender dave?
 

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I changed fenders because I couldn't get the army green Kawi ones anymore. I do think the stock Gen2 fenders are worse than the stock Gen1 fenders

Dave
 

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Dave, When you write 30 - 33%. Preload/sag, do you mean the suspension by 30 -33% of its total travel when the rider sits on the bike?
 

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Dave, When you write 30 - 33%. Preload/sag, do you mean the suspension by 30 -33% of its total travel when the rider sits on the bike?
Yes. A Gen2 has 7.9" travel on the front and 7.3" travel on the rear therefore sag should be 2.4 - 2.6" front and 2.2 - 2.4" rear. Sag should be measured as the difference between when the bike has zero load (suspension topped out) vs. rider c/w all gear and any other load. Suspension and Springs

Dave
 
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