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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I feel that my 2018 KLR650 is still too tall.
I still can't flat foot the ground after putting on the 2" lowering links on.
The PO replaced the stock rear spring with a Top Gun spring (not sure which rate) which I'm sure is stiffer.

Will going back to a stock spring make a significant difference in lowering the rear when I put my fat butt on the seat?
I don't want to replace the seat.
Anyone have a stock spring for sale???
 

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Have you slide the fork tubes up thru the triple clamps 2-3 inches also?

It might be simpler to ask if any long legged, heavier rider of a low mileage 2014.5 - 2018 bike would like to Trade you an Entire rear shock absorber?

You each pay shipping & simply install a completely assembled & functional shock absorber. Done.

If that still isn't soft enough for your short legs, Trade Again. This time for a 2008 - 2014.0 shock absorber.
YOU WILL Need to have the side-stand shortened by a welding shop or a good friend.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Have you slide the fork tubes up thru the triple clamps 2-3 inches also?

It might be simpler to ask if any long legged, heavier rider of a low mileage 2014.5 - 2018 bike would like to Trade you an Entire rear shock absorber?

You each pay shipping & simply install a completely assembled & functional shock absorber. Done.

If that still isn't soft enough for your short legs, Trade Again. This time for a 2008 - 2014.0 shock absorber.
YOU WILL Need to have the side-stand shortened by a welding shop or a good friend.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I tried raising the tubes 1 1/4" but did not make much difference.
Put them back so I would loose clearence.I think 2 to 3 would be too much but thanks for the idea.

Ya trading the shock would be easier .
 

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I may have a Stock 2016 spring around here. I can't remember if I already gave it away. You'll need a spring compressor and "balls of steel". Other than that it's pretty simple. The stock 2016 spring was way better than the 2013 stocker. Neither come close to the Cogent setup I have on both of them.

Anyway, I'll dig around in the garage if you are interested. Free (just pay actual shipping). If you ever come down south near San Diego, I'll hand it to you.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I may have a Stock 2016 spring around here. I can't remember if I already gave it away. You'll need a spring compressor and "balls of steel". Other than that it's pretty simple. The stock 2016 spring was way better than the 2013 stocker. Neither come close to the Cogent setup I have on both of them.

Anyway, I'll dig around in the garage if you are interested. Free (just pay actual shipping). If you ever come down south near San Diego, I'll hand it to you.
Mike
Ok thanks let me know.
 

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OK, first you need to set your sag properly; do NOT use springrate/sag to artificially lower the seat height to where you feel it should be or you will severely compromise your suspension. That said it's possible the aftermarket spring you have installed is too heavy......only by measuring the sag will you know for sure. I don't know your height, inseam, load or usage but generally, I'm not in favor of using lowering links as the longer links increase leverage on the stock shock, effectively reducing both springrate and damping. Luckily your bike has stiffer suspension than 2014 and earlier bikes but still.... 1" links aren't great, 2" lowering links are even worse.

There are proper ways to lower the suspension but they aren't cheap. A good compromise would be a custom lowered Cogent Moab and adjusting the forks in the triples to suit. Honestly, before I went that route, I'd consider a shorter seat and/or taller boots! .....the other option is to ride and get used to it; my ex-wife rode a stock height Gen1 and she's 5'4".....but she was also the PNWMA Women's offroad champion for four years in a row - experience and practice can make a big difference. flat footing is a "want", not a "need". ;-)

2 cents,
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Well I'm trying to go the cheap route.

I'm 5'10" 260 lbs.
I'm in between tippy towing and flat footing level ground.
Not a beginner rider by no means.
 

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Well I'm trying to go the cheap route.

I'm 5'10" 260 lbs.
I'm in between tippy towing and flat footing level ground.
Not a beginner riders by no means.
Understood; cheap is the norm for most KLR Owners. My intention is to make you aware of how your decisions will affect your bike's ride and handling. I'm also 5'10" and ride a stock height Gen1 with the sag set properly at around 30%.

A softer spring will indeed make the the rear squat more, but that's not a desireable way to lower the seat height and may have undesireable effects on how the suspension functions. Again, grab a buddy and a tape measure and check the sag and then you'll know what you're dealing with - aim for 25 - 33% which on a Gen2 shock is 1.83" - 2.41".....I'd aim for 2" - 2.25" . It's hard to say with the combo of 2" lowering links (making it softer) and an aftermarket spring (probably making it stiffer) what your current sag is likely to be.

Dave
 

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I searched everywhere today. I'm sorry, I cant find either of the stock springs. I'll look again Saturday.
Mike
 

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I feel that my 2018 KLR650 is still too tall.
I still can't flat foot the ground after putting on the 2" lowering links on.
The PO replaced the stock rear spring with a Top Gun spring (not sure which rate) which I'm sure is stiffer.

Will going back to a stock spring make a significant difference in lowering the rear when I put my fat butt on the seat?
I don't want to replace the seat.
Anyone have a stock spring for sale???
I too am vertically challenged at 5'8" during and a 29" inseam. Here are some things I've leaned after owning two Gen 1s and my current 2017 Gen 2.

I'm not sure why the PO would have changed the rear spring because I believe the later model Gen 2s were upgraded to an 8kg rear spring which is much better than the older Gen 2s. Nevertheless your Top Gun spring should be color coded and you can look on their website to see what you have. I wouldn't try to achieve lowering by softening your sag as it will negatively impact performance. You also shouldn't lower the rear more than 2" with lowering links because you will potentially have issues bottoming out. I went with 1" Moose/Devol lowering links.

Don't raise your tubes in the triple clamp more than 2". There is just barely 2" of clearance at the stock setting from the top of the front tire to the fender mounting bolts at full compression. Raising the fork tubes any more than 2" will cause the tire to hit the fender mounting bolts if you bottom out the front suspension. Also I think lowering the front and rear more than 1" changes the geometry of the bike more than I'm willing to potentially impact performance. I raised my forks 1" in the triple clamps which still allows plenty of clearance for different tread depths and tire heights from brand to brand. The net effect of my lowered suspension is about 1" at the center of the bike at the low point of the seat.

Finally I replaced the stock seat with the Sargent Low World Seat that is 2" lower than stock. This gives me a total of being 3" lower to the ground than the OEM configuration without significantly changing the geometry of the bike or causing clearance issues. I can now stand with both balls of my feet on the ground at a stop light and find it easier to back it up when I'm sitting on the bike. As mentioned above, don't forget to shorten your kickstand. Good Luck.

(note 04/06/2021): I just edited my post to reflect that today I swapped my 1 3/4" lowering links back to my 1" lowering links. The paltry 3/8" I was gaining at the center of the bike on the low point of the seat was not worth lowering the rear another 3/4". This is partly due to my not wanting to raise my fork tubes in the triple clamp any more than the 1" that I already have.)

KC
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The packing-up of the accordion fork boots prevents the front tire from firmly contacting the mounting area or mounting bolts of the front fender.
One can loosen & compress a fork boot to the absolute maximum and measure the distance between top of boot to the bottom of the triple clamp of a stock bike (ie, before alterations) to confirm this.

If one Removes the fork boots & relies solely on the wipers to keep the mud out of the fork seals, I'll suggest to NEVER slide the fork tubes up thru the triple clamps!
 
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Fork boots are not analogous to a shock rubber stop. If there was a condition where the fork boots "packed up" due to bottoming of the forks, I think they would just split.
 

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Fork boots are not analogous to a shock rubber stop. If there was a condition where the fork boots "packed up" due to bottoming of the forks, I think they would just split.
You are more than welcome to slide your fork boots down as far and firmly as you can and then measure just how little upper tube re-location it requires to create accordion pack-up, according to the listed fork travel in your book!

Years ago I had an older couple from Bridgewater, Nova Scotia come thru on a pair of Gen 1 KLR's. The tiny little Mrs. Rob Tiarks bike had about 4 inches of fork tube above the triple clamp. Not a mark one from the tire on the underside of the fender. They rode to Alaska and back to Nova Scotia thru potholes and everything.

I've managed to 'shake' a front fender on a 1 & 3/4 inch lowered Gen 2 hard enough to put a small tire track inside the back half of its front fender.

They can not stroke full travel when the fork tubes with Boots are pulled up enough to appreciably lower the seat height!
 

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I’ve wondered about that. It seems to me that if you are not doing Motocross jumps, you won’t jam the fork to the top of its travel.
 

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I’ve wondered about that. It seems to me that if you are not doing Motocross jumps, you won’t jam the fork to the top of its travel.
I used to violently bottom my gen1 forks when it was all stock on relatively mild bumps....I joke that a stock gen1 will bottom on crosswalk lines! LOL

Now, with proper suspension, I still bottom occasionally but that's what you want. I've not tried it but I don't think the fork boots alone would stop me from bottoming - not strong enough...or maybe I'm harder on my suspension that Mrs. tiarks! ;-)

Dave
 
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