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I was driving to Moab and was hit several times by gusts of wind. I guess I was pretty naive about how much wind can move you and it's terrifying. Anyone have any advice on how to anticipate wind gusts?

https://youtu.be/mnJQdCbPgVQ

I also should mention the wind behind a semi you're following is a headache to deal with too. Either pass the semi or stay a few hundred feet behind it.
 

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I was driving to Moab and was hit several times by gusts of wind. I guess I was pretty naive about how much wind can move you and it's terrifying. Anyone have any advice on how to anticipate wind gusts?

https://youtu.be/mnJQdCbPgVQ

I also should mention the wind behind a semi you're following is a headache to deal with too. Either pass the semi or stay a few hundred feet behind it.
Indeed, strong wind gusts can be unnerving on a KLR.

Riding too close to the back of a semi is dangerous business and may be taxing on your cooling system, owing to inadequate air flow.

Jason
 

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I was driving to Moab and was hit several times by gusts of wind. I guess I was pretty naive about how much wind can move you and it's terrifying. Anyone have any advice on how to anticipate wind gusts?

https://youtu.be/mnJQdCbPgVQ

I also should mention the wind behind a semi you're following is a headache to deal with too. Either pass the semi or stay a few hundred feet behind it.
Indeed, strong wind gusts can be unnerving on a KLR.

Riding too close to the back of a semi is dangerous business and may be taxing on your cooling system, owing to inadequate air flow.

Jason
Yeah, certainly not tailgating trucks. In fact, I find that 3 to 4 car lengths behind a semi is about the worst spot for wind.

I had no idea about inadequate air flow for the cooling system. I'll have to check that out.

Thanks, man.
 

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All one really needs to do is to Push the windward side of the handlebar Down into the Wind. Your muscles will automatically give the handlebars the proper amount of counter-steering without even thinking about it. Don't think about 'steering' the bike, think of it as 'tilting' the bike.

Another way to think about cross-wind corrections is to Allow the wind to blow the front wheel while your hands keep your head on the same line, and keep your eyes level.

If one will practice quick wheel track to wheel track or lane to lane changes on deserted stretches of highway while in windy conditions and even while going around curves this will all become second nature.
 

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Your suspension sag, or "race sag" as it's sometimes called, has an enormous affect on stability at speed and the problem is exacerbated under windy conditions. The rear shock does not have sufficient spring force for optimal sag for riders over about 150 pounds. So if you haven't already done so, you may want to check your suspension sag, as it may be contributing to your instability under windy conditions.

Jason
 
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