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Discussion Starter · #102 ·
Thanks for the follow up. Have you done the oil mod? It looks interesting but Eagle Mike thinks it's all about the piston/ oil ring design.
Hi Doug. No, never did the PD oil mod myself, didn't think it necessary. IMO the theory behind it is correct, and KLR Chris supported the mod, did it himself... however, the reason I say not required, is because in my experience, having done a bunch of big bore piston upgrades on the KLRs, is that installing a JE (what Eagle Mike & Schnitz sells) or Wossner piston pretty much eliminates oil consumption issues. I suppose if you really wring 'em out, they could eventually become oil burners too, but these "racing pistons" tolerate high rpm better, are far superior to stock piston/rings.

I've chimed in here before in this forum, about how hard high rpm/high piston speed operation is on the stock piston & rings - you just have to look at the engineering and physics involved, to appreciate how hard the engine is being worked at 5000+ rpm. So as not to repeat myself, here's a link to that discussion:

 

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My PDW oil flow modifications were developed & proven to help reduce higher RPM oil consumption on engines still using the stock OEM piston & ring set (with the very narrow oil ring & small oil return holes) that come in every KLR650 from the factory. To assist the cost conscience owner of Newer excess oil burning KLR's.
Many oil consumption issues can Only be solved by proper rebuilding of an engines top-end & then proper maintenance!

Tom Schmitz, aka Souperdoo, is still running the PDW crankshaft oil control orifice in his Wossener 11:1 piston equipped 2009 KLR650.

The enlarged oil holes in the oil pipe banjo bolts were done by Kawasaki on the KLX650's & KLX 250's clear back in 1993. And continue to be used on the KLX series engines to this day.
The 'tiny' single 1/16" oil cross-hole banjo bolts were (and are still) only used on the KLR series engines. The frigging brake hose banjo bolts have 2 large cross-holes. And could (maybe should) be used in the oil pipe of the engine!

But Kawasaki has never chosen to up-grade the oil pipe banjo bolts on the lowly KLR650.
One ought to ask oneself, isn't more oil flow thru the camshaft bearings and across the hot cylinder head ' a good thing'? Isn't more oil flung off of the transmission gears and into the upper balancer shaft bearings 'a good thing'?

I've got over 89,000 miles on oem stock parts & over 25,000 miles on my PDW oil flow mods performed on my engine.
Yes I still need to add some oil occasionally. But for the way I flog it in the wide-open spaces of WY, it ought to be expected.

I hope to Never have the same type of failure that member '@ptxyz' did, but I keep pressing my luck. :)
 

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Hi GWN, I just found my new favourite MC machine shop. In Vancouver there's only Mongoose and they are booked up and Uber expensive. They want $150 per valve seat so $600 for a KLR head. Precisioncycleworks.ca in Oshawa will do the Eagle mike job for $230 cdn. Their facebook page shows what equipment they have and some of the jobs they do. I used to work in a MC machine shop 40+ years ago and these guys have the best kit on the go
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This shows the putting new seats in a MX head. I was considering buying the Neway cutters as that is what I used back in the day but there's no point now
 

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Hi GWN, I just found my new favourite MC machine shop. In Vancouver there's only Mongoose and they are booked up and Uber expensive. They want $150 per valve seat so $600 for a KLR head. Precisioncycleworks.ca in Oshawa will do the Eagle mike job for $230 cdn. Their facebook page shows what equipment they have and some of the jobs they do. I used to work in a MC machine shop 40+ years ago and these guys have the best kit on the go
..
This shows the putting new seats in a MX head. I was considering buying the Neway cutters as that is what I used back in the day but there's no point now
Where are you located? I have a guy here in Alberta who does heads reasonable. Pm me. He did my head. We bought blank valves and cut to fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #107 · (Edited)
I think finding a competent machine shop willing to take on a KLR head could be a challenge, especially at a reasonable price! I see Eagle Mike website still lists head refurbishment, for $225 (a bargain IMO). Shipping costs... way back when I sent 'em a head, I remember shipping was $90 USD each way!

 

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I think finding a competent machine shop willing to take on a KLR head could be a challenge, especially at a reasonable price! I see Eagle Mike website still lists head refurbishment, for $225 (a bargain IMO). Shipping costs... way back when I sent 'em a head, I remember shipping was $90 USD each way!

I've tried to contact Eagle Mike but his website says he has cancer and he has not answered my emails about doing my head or cylinder.
 

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I've tried to contact Eagle Mike but his website says he has cancer and he has not answered my emails about doing my head or cylinder.
Yes, Mike has been sick but AFAIK as of a couple weeks ago, he was working and doing OK. Try calling him.

Another option: ENGINE DYNAMICS These guys have done tons of KLR heads

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #112 ·
I'm in the Vancouver area. Where did the blanks come from?
Doug, I actually still have a set of NIP .5mm oversize exhaust valves from Schnitz Racing if you're interested, literally the last ones they had for sale before running out. I'll probably never use 'em, would sell for $100 plus shipping. PM me if interested.
 

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Here's a professional option for valve train components. Likely what alot of the "shops" are using. You'll need to have your 'specs' in order and have some idea of what you need but this it what I used for my 'boosted RZR' heads.


We wish EM the all the best!

Just for fun: here's a picture of the fully developed RZR ports and chamber that was running oversized Ferrea valves and bronze guides, everything done by hand (not using a dremel) but professional porting equipment FYI. Best wishes as always
Glasses Dog Vision care Carnivore Goggles
 
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Do those larger valves increase horsepower/torque or just move the peak to a different engine speed?
Depends on the setup. In 'boosted' applications it's all about lbs/min of airflow. In N/A applications it's dependent on many variables. In alot of cases going to a (-1) valve can increase torque due to the increase in 'air speed' At a given rpm.

In a nutshell, there's not a finite answer or increase ect.
 

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Depends on the setup. In 'boosted' applications it's all about lbs/min of airflow. In N/A applications it's dependent on many variables. In alot of cases going to a (-1) valve can increase torque due to the increase in 'air speed' At a given rpm.

In a nutshell, there's not a finite answer or increase ect.
What about KLR environment assuming you cannot change air flow angle.
Isn't reducing valve size more difficult than enlarging it?
 

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What about KLR environment assuming you cannot change air flow angle.
Isn't reducing valve size more difficult than enlarging it?
Not necessarily, most 'valve' seats have plenty of 'depth' to recut the seat further into the head. 1mm across the valve seat diameter isn't all that much so the seat can be recut at a depth that suits a slightly smaller valve. However, more work by a knowledgeable person is required to 'deshroud' so as to maximize the benefits.

Compared to a seat setup for racing, the stock seat diameter is fairly wide to begin with which givesa decent amount of room to work on.
 
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When I disassembled my top end I just polished the exhaust port and removed small portion on the mid bottom so the cutaway looks like bean instead of figure 8.

This was the original.
Automotive tire Rim Gas Automotive wheel system Auto part



I cut the stud and removed the mid bottom area. I figured the gas flow velocity is lower on the bottom so it may help with the scavenging. The mid top is almost untouched.
Automotive tire Rim Gas Auto part Automotive wheel system



I thought about doing the 'gasket matching' since the exhaust port area is still still smaller.....
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Gas Automotive wheel system


But then went against it since the header wall and mount will obstruct the gas flow. There is also risk to remove the header mount weld completely by doing that.
Automotive tire Wood Rim Gas Tints and shades



Instead I use the wax to "match the header". I put the wax in the exhaust and attached the header with the nuts. Sorry that it took strange form like that :p
I could see there are some stepped area that needed to be shaved to improve the flow.
Hood Black Wood Automotive tire Artifact



I removed the welding bead on this area and make it flat with header wall.
Automotive tire Wood Tints and shades Automotive fog light Automotive lighting


But I only shaved a little bit on this part since the exhaust port almost matches the welding bead's height.
Hood Automotive lighting Grille Automotive tire Automotive exhaust


I did not touch the inlet port and unfortunately I could not touch the valve seat area since I had a shop cleaned and reinstalled the valve. I don't have the valve spring press.

The worst part is that I've never ridden the bike in its original condition so I don't know how much the improvement I got :LOL::LOL:
 
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