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Well, yesterday I got to work and had my helmet hanging on my handlebar while I put stuff in the Action Packer and the helmet fell off onto the pavement. Sure enough, landed right on the faceshield.

I can still see through it okay, but it's kind of annoying. Anybody know any product that's designed to "sand" scratches out of stuff like that? I would describe the damage as "scuffed," and of course it's right where I look through the shield on the right.

The cheapest visor I can find for a Bell Revolver helmet runs around $40 and I hate to spend almost half the price of the helmet itself just for a new shield. I'm willing to take a shot at fixing it if the price of the product needed to do so is reasonable compared to the cost of a new visor.

I've looked around and found techniques using everything from toothpaste to Brass-O to 1500-grit sandpaper but I'm kind of skeptical of the "how-to" sites. Right now I can still see through it and keep using it, but I'd hate to mess it up even worse.

Anybody had any experience with this? I would appreciate any opinions or experiences.
 

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planalp

If the scratch is beyond what Plexis will polish out you are going to have to resort to mechanical means to get the scratch out. It will take some sand paper to get the scratch out. Once the scratch is out you can resort to progressively finer polishes to clean things up, but expect an optical aberration in the face shield.

Polishing with anything, be it toothpaste, Bon Ami, or a plastic polish, without removing the actual scratch or scuff will merely polish the scuff; it won't remove it.

T
 

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planalp-

I think you've nothing to lose by trying to fix it. Might be a good How To if you're successful!

What I've done in the past with scratches (windscreens, headlights, face shields) was to start with 1000 grit wet-or-dry, then progress to 1500, then move to rubbing/polishing compounds, ending up with something like Plexis.

As to the cost, I used stuff I had in the garage.

There are products designed to polish up headlight lenses, but they are designed to remove haze, not scratches. Not sure if they would be helpful or worth the cost vs what you can put together out of the garage.

I think there are finer grades of paper available, but you might have to go to a specialty shop to find them.

Tom
 

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If its a clear shield you might want to try one of the scratch removers for glasses they have out on the market. They are pretty inexpensive. Good luck with it bro. Have a shield like that that annoys the heck out of me.


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I'm leaning toward Tom's sandpaper/polishes technique if I can find paper that fine around here. Hobby store, maybe?

I figured I would never get it perfect, but some waviness/aberration would probably be preferable to the scratches.
 

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i used a kit to refinish tail light lense covers on a classic car. You start with the coarsest emry cloth then ending with the finest, think the finest cloth was 4000 or 8000 grit. Then ending with their patented (a sarcastic 'right') liquid polish. It was kind of labor intense but put heck of a mirror finish on the plastic lenses and i bet it would work great for you.
Gosh i wish i could remember what it was called. Think it was like NuvoShine or something.
 

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Novus (available at most Harley shops) has a nice 3 step solution for you but...

If it won't wipe off, you are going to have to remove material. That makes it bad in a couple ways.

The first is that most face shields use some method of hardening the outer layer of plastic. You can remove enough material to make it clear again, but you will be in softer plastic, so it will be much more likely to scratch again with less effort.

The second problem, is optics. Manually polishing and removing material is going to turn the optically correct shield into a (in)corrective lens, because it is impossible to remove the same amount of material through to entire surface of the shield. It might not seem like much from the outside, but after looking through it for any length of time, you can almost guarantee yourself a nice headache. Imagine having to drive through an old house window with all the waves and distortions.

My recommendation, live with the scratches (I have been for better than a year on one of my shields) or replace the shield. If you're going to replace it, get one with tear-off posts, and always run a couple layers of tear-offs. That way, on the next drop, clearing the shield of scratches involves removing only a tear-off or two.
 

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All good advice above.

I think you'll find paper up to about 1500 grit at Lowes/Home Depot/OSH/Tractor Supply and in an automotive store. There's not much call for finer grits in most refinishing applications.

If you can find a kit like basement describes with the finer grit papers you'll be better off, as going from 1500 grit to fully polished will take you through most of an NCIS marathon. That's a long time, so better hope it's a Ziva marathon rather than Kate...

Tom
 

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I've used Brasso before for polishing scratches out of my sons game discs, seems to work quite well! I've never tried it on a visor though...
 

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You could try MicroMesh, it's used for aircraft windshields and canopies. I bought a kit years ago to repair a badly scratched canopy but never got around to it. Still have the canopy-still scratched. I think it was mainly very fine sanding pads along with some kind of liquid solution. I've heard that it works well.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Novus (available at most Harley shops) has a nice 3 step solution for you but...

If it won't wipe off, you are going to have to remove material. That makes it bad in a couple ways.

The first is that most face shields use some method of hardening the outer layer of plastic. You can remove enough material to make it clear again, but you will be in softer plastic, so it will be much more likely to scratch again with less effort.

The second problem, is optics. Manually polishing and removing material is going to turn the optically correct shield into a (in)corrective lens, because it is impossible to remove the same amount of material through to entire surface of the shield. It might not seem like much from the outside, but after looking through it for any length of time, you can almost guarantee yourself a nice headache. Imagine having to drive through an old house window with all the waves and distortions.

My recommendation, live with the scratches (I have been for better than a year on one of my shields) or replace the shield. If you're going to replace it, get one with tear-off posts, and always run a couple layers of tear-offs. That way, on the next drop, clearing the shield of scratches involves removing only a tear-off or two.
You bring up some good points, especially that the shield might be more annoying/bothersome to look through after a repair, even if all the scratches are gone.

It would suck to spend a bunch of time working on it just to have it turn out bad in another way.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well, gave it some thought and am leaning toward petitioning the wife for the upgraded EVO Revolution helmet for Christmas and just keeping the old one for dirt-roading. I also discovered when I was trying to shut them the other night while riding that one of the vent slider tab things broke off during the fall/tumble so I have to use a screwdriver or something to slide it back and forth.

I've grown to like the Revolver after using it for commuting this year. The improved model claims to have reduced wind noise and it offers a chin curtain, a feature I would really like to have when it's cold out as a large amount of cold air enters the helmet from the bottom without one.

Plus, need to start moving away from the all-black gear/bike scheme that I've inadvertently put together by finding good deals on stuff that was only offered in a particular color: i.e. black.

Debating on the hi-viz yellow, white or metallic silver to try to stand out from the background a little more when riding.

Thanks for the input, guys, but I don't think trying to blend the scratches out is worth the trouble. Time to get an improved helmet and remember not to hang the thing on the handlebars anymore.
 

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I'm afraid I have no suggestions for the scratch.

After removing my helmet, I always put it on the ground. It's pretty dang difficult to drop a helmet if it's already on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'm afraid I have no suggestions for the scratch.

After removing my helmet, I always put it on the ground. It's pretty dang difficult to drop a helmet if it's already on the ground.
You're a wiser man than I. No more hanging the old brain bucket off the handlebars. Must say, tho, first time I've ever done it.
 

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If you have an autobody supply store nearby they should have wet/dry papers in stock up to 3000grit. I've used this method on Volvo headlight lenses, works well. You might also try an eyeglass manufacturing lab. They have to polish optical lenses somehow...
 

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After removing my helmet, I always put it on the ground. It's pretty dang difficult to drop a helmet if it's already on the ground.
True enough but in the same way the motorcycles natural position is on it's side. The only thing keeping it up is the side/centerstand. DAMHIK !!!
 

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planalp -

Thought you might find this interesting.

T
 

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Discussion Starter #20
planalp -

Thought you might find this interesting.

T
Indeed I did. The oven/heat gun method seems to be the most effective.
I foresee only bad things happening if I tried that (wife being alerted to her stove being ruined by the stench of burning plastic and the din of my own shouted profanities and smoke detectors going off) but it would be interesting to try. I don't know if I could do mine without the oven-drying step, but I'd experiment with a heat gun if I had nothing to lose. I don't think I could bring myself to do the "24 hours in the oven at 250" thing.
 
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