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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I need some help! Please! Tonight I decided to take the bike out and get it nice and warm then change the oil one last time before parking it for the winter. It was about 50 degrees outside. I drained all of the oil.. then was going to put the drain plug back in to 16-17 ft/lbs... when it got to about 5 ft/lbs, a couple of pieces fell of the engine! Now there is a big gap on the left (kickstand) side of the drain plug... Also, it wont even tighten up to 5 ft/lbs before slipping and spinning (as if it were stripped). I have never tightened it over 16 ft/lbs and unsure of how it could have broken! I did have issues recently with oil lightly leaking, and it could be that this piece was cracked... Does anyone have any ideas/advice on what I can do to fix this!? I am obviously not rich, so I am looking for any advise possible to fix this!? Thank you very much!!

I have attached some pics of the pieces, breakage, and gap (with drain plug tightened).

View attachment 1234

View attachment 1235

View attachment 1236

photo 4.JPG
 

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Oh thats not good. I can't think of anyway to "fix" that without fixing it. Maybe someone else will though. Were you using a crush washer with it?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oh thats not good. I can't think of anyway to "fix" that without fixing it. Maybe someone else will though. Were you using a crush washer with it?
Yes, the crush washer was there. I think it actually hit something (high center) on one of my off-road riding trips this summer. Kinda in a loss for what to do..
 

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I could see that. I've thought about getting a skid plate just for that reason. I bet you did pop it, cracked the case, seeped some oil, you finally broke it lose when reinstalling.

Maybe you could drain ALL the oil, clean it thoroughly, JB weld the pieces back on and Hope. :(
 

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The JB Weld might work if you do a good job of degreasing. Short of welding-up the aluminum or patching the hole (by welding) and drilling a new drain hole, I'd make a thin steel sleeve (threaded outside to fit your existing drain hole, and inside to fit a smaller bolt) JB weld it in-place, and build up the outside with JB weld and fiberglass fibers. While you're building up the outside, insert your new drain bolt with a thin coat of grease on all surfaces. That will give the crush washer an even surface to seal against (of course, you'll need a smaller crush washer) and the grease will keep you from gluing your bolt in-place.
 

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Yup, I say JB Weld and positive thinking. Sorry dude.
 

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I need some help! Please!
This is my BEST EFFORT at offering you help, vinson1213!

The probability of success, if you follow my suggestions, is in the high 90 % range; if the solution offered does NOT work, you're no worse off (other than out single-digit dollars).

GET AN OVERSIZE OIL DRAIN PLUG, replace your stock plug with this component.

An oversize oil drain plug (M12 X 1.5) has the same pitch as the original, but . . . is slightly larger in diameter. The replacement part's tapered, self-tapping threads re-cuts the threads as it is screwed into the existing hole.

Use some care during initial insertion, maybe some "backing-and-filling," and--some grease on the new plug helps attract any metal shavings for removal, once the enlarged threads are cut.

Chances are your local auto parts and accessories store has oversize oil drain plugs in stock. Otherwise, an Internet search produces hits like this:

http://www.cgenterprises.com/drain_plugs_oversize_repair.htm

Doesn't work? You can then look into inserts, drilling-and-tapping for a larger size plug, welding, or whatever.

I have given you a low-cost, possibly permanent solution to your problem; if the oversize oil drain plug seals, it heals, in my book.

Stand by for posters who run, screaming, from the room at the mention of oversize oil drain plugs. Yet, one must wonder; how do the guys who work at the oversize oil drain plug factories ever make any sales, earn a livelihood, if their products are no good?

Good luck!

(Oh, and do NOT over-tighten the aftermarket plug, now! :) )
 

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Lonerider,
Not bagging on your solution, but we put my father-in-laws 15-year-old dog to sleep last night and I could use a laugh. So I'm having one here:

"Stand by for posters who run, screaming, from the room at the mention of oversize oil drain plugs. Yet, one must wonder; how do the guys who work at the oversize oil drain plug factories ever make any sales, earn a livelihood, if their products are no good?" The same way cigarette manufactures and Ginsu knife makers do!

Okay, not really very funny but my threshold is pretty low this morning. If his threads were just stripped or crossthreaded I'd be right with you on this. I just don't see (from the pictures) how the crush washer will seat.
Regards
Mark
 

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Normally that would work, but looking at pic #2 I don't know. No matter how far our you go it's still not going to seal flush.

You might take it by your local machine ship and see what they think. They've probably seen it all and can "fix" it.
 

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Yes, the crush washer was there. I think it actually hit something (high center) on one of my off-road riding trips this summer. Kinda in a loss for what to do..

Yea the drain plug hangs too low that's why the low profile ones are popular. Even with a skid plate the OEM is vulnerable.

I go along with the JB Weld recomendations. Put the bike on it's side and use a good solvent to clean up the area. Rough up the surface as best you can. Prep is the key to getting a good repair take your time.

I've used JB to make threads like your problem. Put the bolt in with a light lube on it and form the JB around it (the quick set JB will be easier to work with to make threads). When it starts to harden carefully unscrew the bolt. Go over the area with the original formula JB to reinforce.
 

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I agree with the JB Weld fix. If it doesn't work, you're no worse off but I've seen that stuff do wonders. I've never used it to create threads, but have fixed some pretty big holes in engine cases that were due to my own stupidity.

Not to dismiss the factory torque specs, but I don't follow them. I have an aftermarket drain plug with safety wire holes. I just use a new crush washer every time and snug the drain plug down to where it doesn't leak, then use safety wire to keep it from coming loose.

You might consider that approach after your repair is done if you feel leery about torquing the bolt as called-for in the manual. But, if you don't have a skid plate, there's really nowhere to anchor the other end of the safety.

Good luck with your repair. Hope you come up with something that works out.
 

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I just don't see (from the pictures) how the crush washer will seat.
Nor do I.

While a new surface for crush washer seating might be built up by creative J-B Weld sculpting, if the oversize drain plug seals, then--maybe, he don't need no stinkin' crush washer!

Hey, oversize oil drain plug worth a try, IMHO; YMMV!

Again, if the oversize oil drain plug does not seal, then . . . no worse off than before! THEN explore other repair avenues.

For those who advocate J-B Weld to form threads, WHY NOT USE AN OVERSIZE OIL DRAIN PLUG INSTEAD? The oversize oil drain plug's tapered, self-tapping threads actually cut new theads; same pitch, but slightly greater diameter. After all, during manufacture, a drilled drain hole was tapped in the aluminum crankcase for a steel drain plug; nothing different, installing an oversize oil drain plug--the plug itself taps new threads.

Why would the J-B Weld advocates not use an oversize oil drain plug, but seek to form J-B Weld threads instead?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the advise everyone.. I am gonna run it by a few machine shops today and see if they have any magic advise. Then, I might try the JB Weld... Lonerider, the only problem with an oversized drain plug is that 1/2 my threads are missing. So, there isn't a whole lot to re-thread (thread into). I will give it another look this morning and see if something stands out though. Might be worth a try...

I don't know if the JB Weld would be a reliable permanent, will it? I don't know if I should get it repaired and try to sell it and but another used KLR?
 

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An oversize oil drain plug costs maybe $ 4 at AutoZone or Pep Boys, but--if you don't want to try it, your call! A few minutes, and you may have a permanent fix at that expense. I've had "miracle cures" with oversize drain plugs; your case may be beyond that technique's effective capacity.

You might want to look into Heli-Coil or Time-Sert, etc., thread inserts.

Or, consider drilling and tapping to a larger size, e.g., M14 . . . come to think of it, plain ol' 1/2" is slightly larger than the 12 mm OEM hole; oughta be enough metal for threads with a 1/2" tap and your existing, stripped hole, without re-boring, maybe!

Worst case, weld up, machine flat, drill and tap.

Regardless, salvageable, I think.
 

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I can't vouch for repeated removal/reinstallation of a drain plug using formed JB Weld threads, but I once stripped the front drain plug (yes, the car had two) on a '91 Grand Marquis.

Since the stripped plug wasn't responsible for actually removing much of the used oil and the other one was, I just stuck the drain plug back in the stripped hole (the threads didn't even engage) and made a bead around the drain plug head against the case using JB Weld.

When the car was sold 15 years later, the plug and JB Weld were still like-new. Just an example of the permanence of this particular use of JB Weld.

That said, if you have the capability to haul the KLR to some different machine/welding shops and see what kind of equipment and capabilities they have and don't mind doing so, it's worth seeing what they have to say.
 

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JB weld is OK

JB weld is good to 500F so can take the heat fine
I would use wax (not oil) on the bolt and the remaining case threads to keep it from sticking to the epoxy
clean the bonding surfaces with isopropyl alcohol

this advise comes from a person who is very handy with a TIG welder ...
 

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Forgot to note that whatever fix you decide on, I would definitely get those surfaces where the pieces cracked off either covered up or sealed. If those jagged, porous edges aren't sealed in some way, corrosion could become a problem in the future, further weakening an already-fragile area.
 

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I would use wax (not oil) on the bolt and the remaining case threads to keep it from sticking to the epoxy
clean the bonding surfaces with isopropyl alcohol

this advise comes from a person who is very handy with a TIG welder ...
I've asked the question earlier, speedy; why do you favor JB Weld-sculpted threads, in contrast to tapped metal thread from an oversize oil drain plug?

Your approach may be superior, just wondering why. The mechanical fastening of the steel drain plug threads against the aluminum case material (as in the OEM configuration) seems more robust to me than depending upon the adhesive (JB Weld) compound to hold the drain plug in the crankcase.

Again, I don't claim the self-tapped oversize drain plug approach is superior, just wonder why it's not considered.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
OKay, do I went to a few machine shops today. They did both mention possibly trying an oversized plug and to try some JB Weld... One of the shops said they could weld aluminum to the casing and then re-tap the plug hole. This would cost roughly $250-$300, but would be the more permanent/reliable fix. They mentioned JB Weld might be cheaper if it works, but there is a chance that it wont work and then it would cost a little more for them to clean it up.
They also asked if the casing is Aluminum or Magnesium??

Would you try the cheaper/home fix first? or invest into a proper/durable fix at the machine shop?
 
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