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Okay everyone, I thought long and hard about this. Afraid of starting fires drove my reluctance to bring this subject forward. I wanted to share this with you some time ago now, but a new residential move and equipment deficiencies put a damper on that until recently.

This should put a wrinkle in your oil changing theories regarding Hot verses Cold oil changes. Ever since I read this article, I’ve changed my oil in all my motorcycles - Cold. Yep, like most if not all of you, I’ve always subscribed to the doctrine “Warm up your engine before you change the oil.” This was due in part to my father’s strict insistence I do so. That meant, of course, any engine, car, truck, motorcycle, tractor, and mowers of all types and any other motor requiring mandatory oil changes. Is it worth the time saved to heat up the oil just to have it drain faster? Of course, for me, in my subconscious I’ve always toyed with the question of heating up the engine just to stir up all those impurities then leaving a fair amount behind to contaminate the replacement oil. Well, here is my justification for not working with “Hot” oil changes anymore. I’m sure there will be a fair amount of backlash regarding this article but that’s okay with me. As I’ve always stated here you can always take it for what you think it’s worth and go from there. I never want to force my beliefs on others, and this is certainly the case here. For me, I will change my oil cold from this day forward. I’ve done it already and found it very refreshing to do so.

Guess if you have any disagreement with the article you could write Jason McDonnell care of Roadracing World & Motorcycle Technology at www.roadracingworld.com

Attached is the article to which I am referring. Enjoy.
 

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It is not worth the time, but if You go to a grocery shop with car/motorcycle and change the oil afterwards it is a time well spent😁
 

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The amount of oil left in the sump will vary wildly between engines. Don't see how this relates at all to the KLR specifically. The article did not even state what engine they did their "study" on.

I measure my oil in and out. 2.5 L in, 2.5 L out. Sometimes a little less on the out but it is lost in the scatter. I change my oil when it's convenient; might be hot, might be cold.

It amazes me how so many people get wrapped around the axle when it comes to the simplest maintenance function of all on a motorcycle or most any piece of equipment for that matter.
 

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You ought to go to a BMW forum and ask what the procedure is for checking the oil level on an R1200RT.

Hint: No part of it involves simply putting the bike on the center stand and bending over to see if there is oil in the sight glass and if it is between the Min/Max lines.
 
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The engine has to have been a non-runner for sometime before I have or would perform a simple COLD Oil Change. And I didn't even waste any time reading the provided article. (I may or may not read it later.)

IMO, hot oil flowing / dripping / drooling from the transmission gears, down the cam chain tunnel, off of the clutch basket and thru the passages between clutch cover/alternator cover and into the main case has no choice but to help carry some of the heavier particulates that had previously taken up residence in the nooks & crannies & pockets of a motorcycle engine case.
Particularly if one tilts the bike from side to side a 1/2 dozen times during the draining process.

I've drained over an extra pint out of a GoldWing engine as to what the high-mileage owner had suggested that it would take to re-fill it.

Maybe this is why some owners claim their engine oil 'Blackens' so quickly? They left a dirty pint in it!
 

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On my KLR i change oil cold because it takes a long time to drain the oil filter cavity, and it make a mess when it's full and you open it.

On my car i change it medium rare. This way i don't burn my fingers.
 

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I told myself I wasn't going to chime in on this one but I can't help myself. It goes without saying that hot oil flows MUCH more freely than cold oil, also taking all that junk sitting at the bottom of your crankcase out the drain hole with it. Also you'll be sitting there forever waiting for the last of your oil to drip out and it probably all won't come out. Takes long enough when the oils hot! But go ahead and keep doing cold oil changes if that's what you want.
 

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does this matter if your engine seems to eat oil? i had an engine at one time that seemed like it needed oil every time i needed gas riding long distances. the engine preformed better than i could have expectected as it ran low on several occatisions. on one such occasion which i lost my oil drain plug 1/4 mile from from my house. i watched the last bits of oil drip out when i arrived. the engine still ran when i filled it with the proper amounts of oil.I thought my engine would seize. especially with that kind of treatment. but the engine still runs. to my surprise.
 

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Draining hot versus cold oil is as contentious a topic as what is the best oil brand or type. In fact it ranks right up there with which is the best potato salad--mustard or mayonnaise base?

R/L makes a valid comment about internal engine geometry being a factor. The more circuitous the drain path, the longer it will take for the oil to move from the top of the engine to the sump. On my car I drain the oil cold because of the seemingly convoluted oil drain path—it’s a flat six. I drained my car engine once with the oil hot and it seemed to take an excessive (over two hours) amount of time to drain completely. So I switched to draining cold and, subjectively speaking, the drain time was reduced.

On my wife’s car I suck the oil out hot. Sucking versus draining is another super contentious topic.

Notably, I drain the engine oil from my road toilet (FLHTK) and KLR with whatever temperature the oil happens at the time I decide to change it. But, I change the oil every 1,500 on both bikes, which will compensate for small ills.

So there you have it live from Katy, Texas where all the women are strong, the men are good looking and the children are above average (Garrison Keillor).

Jason
 

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Oil change - Warm it up for a few minutes, not hot. - Put a small amount of SeaFoam in there and idle the engine for a minute or so; clear out the passages, drain it out before the "crap" settles again.

(note - this isnt me telling anyone what to do, just a suggestion. I dont even use the SeaFoam. I was giving an option to folks who say their oil gets dirty quickly)

Last edit: the warm not hot part is because i do the last few threads of the plug by hand and even w gloves on, hot oil can burn skin. So I try to avoid that.

Tater Salad - Mayo based w mustard for flavor.

Keep your stick on the ice - Red Green

sre
 

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I’m not fussed about “hot or cold”, whatever it happens to be is fine.
I don’t care about brands, they all taste the same, BUT


German potato salad RULES!!!
 

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I change it hot....or warm.....but I don't think ir really matters, especially as I change it at 3,000 miles or less.

Dave
 

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On my KLR i change oil cold because it takes a long time to drain the oil filter cavity, and it make a mess when it's full and you open it.
That is what Gunk Engine Degreaser and the garden hose is for. Degrease the engine, frame, skid plate and remove the 5 pounds of mud clods from under the fenders.

I temporarily insert a vinyl plug into the clean oil port at 6:00 in the oil filter cavity and tilt the bike to the right to thoroughly drain the filter cavity. The vinyl plug keeps any crumbs from flowing into the 6:00 clean oil port that goes Directly to the bottom rod bearing! I tilt the bike Left & Right several times during the draining.

JoeExotic, If you were to turn the crankshaft to BDC with the flywheel bolt, the oil filter will drain hot oil from between the clearance of filter cap & clutch cover fairly quickly. If using a centerstand it will drain completely.
 
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You ought to go to a BMW forum and ask what the procedure is for checking the oil level on an R1200RT.

Hint: No part of it involves simply putting the bike on the center stand and bending over to see if there is oil in the sight glass and if it is between the Min/Max lines.
Can confirm. Issue is that RT has a huge oil cooler with a thermostat. Proper oil checking means engine warm enough for oil thermostat to open, so that the cooler can drain back to the crankcase.
 

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Hi All, The original post makes sense if you think about it and if you are unsure, put water and oil in a cup for 24 hours to see where the water is...at the bottom and this is what you want to drain out of your engine along with all the other impurities that will have settled at the bottom. This process, as indicated before also helps with the oil coming out of the filter housing. It's good to embrace different ideas.
 

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The amount of oil left in the sump will vary wildly between engines. Don't see how this relates at all to the KLR specifically. The article did not even state what engine they did their "study" on.

I measure my oil in and out. 2.5 L in, 2.5 L out. Sometimes a little less on the out but it is lost in the scatter. I change my oil when it's convenient; might be hot, might be cold.

It amazes me how so many people get wrapped around the axle when it comes to the simplest maintenance function of all on a motorcycle or most any piece of equipment for that matter.
Or you can purchase an early Gen 2 and just keep adding oil every few hundred miles so you never have to change oil at all.
 

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does this matter if your engine seems to eat oil? i had an engine at one time that seemed like it needed oil every time i needed gas riding long distances. the engine preformed better than i could have expectected as it ran low on several occatisions. on one such occasion which i lost my oil drain plug 1/4 mile from from my house. i watched the last bits of oil drip out when i arrived. the engine still ran when i filled it with the proper amounts of oil.I thought my engine would seize. especially with that kind of treatment. but the engine still runs. to my surprise.
 

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Roller or ball bearings don’t require the same amount of lubrication as “shell” bearings in car engines. However you do have metal to metal “bearings” in the cylinder head/cams and a lot of “sliding” of the cam lobes on the followers. Lock wire your drain plug. And please, don’t run in out of oil.
 
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