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Ok, to be honest, the dirtiest my klr gets is maybe from some road grime or tree sap. BUT, i still struggle to get the nooks and crannies cleaned on the frame/suspension/engine. Ive had decent luck using diluted wheel/tire cleaner, but im afraid repeated use may be harmful to some of the plastic components on the engine. What do you guys use when (if) you clean up your bikes?
 

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I use a solution of Dawn dish soap and water in a quart spray bottle, parking the KLR in the shade and just spraying the stuff everywhere and letting it soak and work for as long as I can before it starts evaporating, then I hit it with a garden hose.

It does a good job at eating chain lube off the rear wheel and oil and chain lube off the inside of the skid plate, etc. The key is to put the Dawn in the bottle after the water so it doesn't foam up before you can get the bottle filled.

Bear in mind I only clean my KLR about once a year so am by no means an authority on motorcycle cleaning, but the Dawn is cheap, I always have some around and it works.
 

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Keeping it Clean....

Good Afternoon All,

I use simple green and a power washer. It gets into all of the nooks and crannies. I admit I only do this maybe once a month if the bike is really filthy. The simple green is biodegradable and the pressure washer takes all of the residule soap and dirt off. Be careful of the soft parts as it will take off decals, stickers and small plastic parts.

Snakeboy66
 

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Beer and a pressure washer once a year whether it wants it or not!



'Life's Journey is not to arrive at the grave safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways,totally worn out, shouting, 'Holy shit .... What a Ride!
Cheers, Nick
 

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For bugs I use hot water soaked towel or synthetic chamois. Flop it on the windscreen and fairing for 10 mins bugs wipe off. For dirt I use S100 cycle wash. It works with garden hose pressure on our local mud. No pressure washing my bikes, but you could if you stand back but I don't want to risk driving water into seals and electrics. Couple times a year I take off the plastic and the tank and clean up the frame area etc. with S100 and sponges, brushes etc. I prefer to do maintenance on clean machines. After the chain dries I lube it.

I've tried "cheaper" wash products, use 3x as much get 1/2 results.
 

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I use diluted Simple Green in a spray bottle, spray it on stream mode everywhere and it breaks up most of the dirt. Wash it off after a bit with a stiff brush and garden hose. I used this technique on my dirt bikes for years and it has always served me well since I don't have a pressure washer.

I might try planalps dishwashing soap diluted, it's probably cheaper than simple green.
 

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Using a pressure washer is a BIG "no-no" for bikes, as it allows water to ingress past seals, gaskets and possibly harm electrics. It can also harm the chain. Whilst it's a quick and easy way to make your bike look snazzy with minimal effort, it's really something which should be avoided at all costs.

I'm a fuss-pot when it comes to cleaning, and keep every bike fastidiously clean. This list is probably overkill for most, but I've ALWAYS done it with every bike I've ever owned and has saved my arse and wallet on many an occasion!!! :D



Nothing beats a garden hose, a host of Meguires and Scottoiler products, some old-fashioned elbow grease and a bit of dedicated time IMO. Cleaning is subjective to how far you want to go and condition of your bike, but I personally HATE riding a filthy bike unless coming back from a big trip.

Here's how I go about it in order...

- Go into the shade and let the bike cool down and sit in the shade

- ***Depending on the severity of grime, mud or extent of cleaning I may remove fairings, tank, etc prior to starting. Cover any precious areas like air-intakes, certain electrics, etc first with tape or plastic bags first in this instance!!!

- Give the entire bike a gentle spray with a garden hose on the gentle-jet-setting to remove dirt and built up grime. Then hit it a second time to remove any residual grime you may have missed first time.

- Use Meguires Gold Class wash in warm water using a sheepskin mitten, and be generous with it in a circular pattern. Get right into the grooves with a fingernail or a used childrens soft toothbrush/fine horse-haired paintbrush for the tiny grooves.

- For the chain, rear rim, engine, swing-arm area, etc, I only use Scottoiler's spray-on cleaner and let it soak in properly for 15 mins. If the chain is looking particularly crappy, I'll also hit it with a dose of kerosene and a hard-bristled toothbrush.

- Hit the bike again with a gentle spray from the garden hose to was all suds and soap residue off.

- Chamois off all water from all fairings, seat, dash, controls, blah blah. Of course make sure the chamois is already moist/wrung-out with fresh water!! Then allow to air-dry.

- Once air-dried, I apply Meguire's Scratch-X if needed, and/or then apply Meguires Gold-Class Wax to the fairings in a circular fashion using a Meguires foam application pad. Once allowed to settle-in and cloud-up after a few minutes, I buff off with a Meguires polishing rag. Once this is done, then I hit it all over again with a lint-free and non-abraisive cloth for extra shine.

- Screen, mirrors and dials then get hit with a spray of Meguires Glass Cleaner, using a non-streak microfibre glass cloth.

- Next all blackened parts get hit with an application of Meguires Gold Class Trim Detailer via another foam application pad. Go gently on this, allow to settle for a few mins, then wipe over gently with a lint-free cloth for an "as new finish" which won't magnetise dirt. NEVER on the seat, pegs, tyres or grips for bleedingly obvious reasons.

- Next I'll silicone spray any engine hoses or rubber parts like slinky's on the forks, etc. Then I'll break out the Nulon brake cleaner carefully (using a rag as a mask) and hit the calipers and rims for any residue, and wipe over thoroughly after a blast with an airhose. This also assists in further removing crap from the calipers and helps make your pads, pistons and their seals last longer. I clean the brake rotors thoroughly, which resists and prevents surface rust, and keeps brake feel sharp.

- After this I'll lubricate the chain, and give an extra wipe-down of the rear rim and swing-arm to remove any lube residue. Tyre pressures also get tended to as a routine.

- I then give the bike a total look-over to ensure that nothing has been missed, then do a lights-check (indicators, brakes, parkers, headlights, dash, etc).

- If any fairings or exterior fittings need to be refitted, now is a good time for blue Loctite, double-checking bolts, and giving any electrical plugs a bit of electrical-contact spray for good measure.

I LOVE cleaning my bike and don't care if it takes me all day...it's a solid maintenance routine for me and allows me to visually check if anything's amiss or coming loose, failing, blah blah. It really ought to be done once a week, or after any decent ride, and helps maintain your bike. Prevention is better than cure!!! :D
 

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Using a pressure washer is a BIG "no-no" for bikes, as it allows water to ingress past seals, gaskets and possibly harm electrics. It can also harm the chain. Whilst it's a quick and easy way to make your bike look snazzy with minimal effort, it's really something which should be avoided at all costs.

I'm a fuss-pot when it comes to cleaning, and keep every bike fastidiously clean. This list is probably overkill for most, but I've ALWAYS done it with every bike I've ever owned and has saved my arse and wallet on many an occasion!!! :D



Nothing beats a garden hose, a host of Meguires and Scottoiler products, some old-fashioned elbow grease and a bit of dedicated time IMO. Cleaning is subjective to how far you want to go and condition of your bike, but I personally HATE riding a filthy bike unless coming back from a big trip.

Here's how I go about it in order...

- Go into the shade and let the bike cool down and sit in the shade

- ***Depending on the severity of grime, mud or extent of cleaning I may remove fairings, tank, etc prior to starting. Cover any precious areas like air-intakes, certain electrics, etc first with tape or plastic bags first in this instance!!!

- Give the entire bike a gentle spray with a garden hose on the gentle-jet-setting to remove dirt and built up grime. Then hit it a second time to remove any residual grime you may have missed first time.

- Use Meguires Gold Class wash in warm water using a sheepskin mitten, and be generous with it in a circular pattern. Get right into the grooves with a fingernail or a used childrens soft toothbrush/fine horse-haired paintbrush for the tiny grooves.

- For the chain, rear rim, engine, swing-arm area, etc, I only use Scottoiler's spray-on cleaner and let it soak in properly for 15 mins. If the chain is looking particularly crappy, I'll also hit it with a dose of kerosene and a hard-bristled toothbrush.

- Hit the bike again with a gentle spray from the garden hose to was all suds and soap residue off.

- Chamois off all water from all fairings, seat, dash, controls, blah blah. Of course make sure the chamois is already moist/wrung-out with fresh water!! Then allow to air-dry.

- Once air-dried, I apply Meguire's Scratch-X if needed, and/or then apply Meguires Gold-Class Wax to the fairings in a circular fashion using a Meguires foam application pad. Once allowed to settle-in and cloud-up after a few minutes, I buff off with a Meguires polishing rag. Once this is done, then I hit it all over again with a lint-free and non-abraisive cloth for extra shine.

- Screen, mirrors and dials then get hit with a spray of Meguires Glass Cleaner, using a non-streak microfibre glass cloth.

- Next all blackened parts get hit with an application of Meguires Gold Class Trim Detailer via another foam application pad. Go gently on this, allow to settle for a few mins, then wipe over gently with a lint-free cloth for an "as new finish" which won't magnetise dirt. NEVER on the seat, pegs, tyres or grips for bleedingly obvious reasons.

- Next I'll silicone spray any engine hoses or rubber parts like slinky's on the forks, etc. Then I'll break out the Nulon brake cleaner carefully (using a rag as a mask) and hit the calipers and rims for any residue, and wipe over thoroughly after a blast with an airhose. This also assists in further removing crap from the calipers and helps make your pads, pistons and their seals last longer. I clean the brake rotors thoroughly, which resists and prevents surface rust, and keeps brake feel sharp.

- After this I'll lubricate the chain, and give an extra wipe-down of the rear rim and swing-arm to remove any lube residue. Tyre pressures also get tended to as a routine.

- I then give the bike a total look-over to ensure that nothing has been missed, then do a lights-check (indicators, brakes, parkers, headlights, dash, etc).

- If any fairings or exterior fittings need to be refitted, now is a good time for blue Loctite, double-checking bolts, and giving any electrical plugs a bit of electrical-contact spray for good measure.

I LOVE cleaning my bike and don't care if it takes me all day...it's a solid maintenance routine for me and allows me to visually check if anything's amiss or coming loose, failing, blah blah. It really ought to be done once a week, or after any decent ride, and helps maintain your bike. Prevention is better than cure!!! :D

This is a joke right? :35a: This is a KLR you're talking about? :animal0009:

Probably should talk to these pro mechanics about pressure washing being a "BIG no-no"

 

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I take care not to spray at bearing areas, but have been pressure washing bikes for 30+ years.. I've never needed to replace a wheel bearing.

I'm not saying that the procedure of washing by hand is wrong, it's just that I prefer riding to washing.. :)

Typically, my KLR gets a serious washdown at winter prep, and maybe one to knock the nasty mud off during the summer.. Other than that, it's rain riding that keeps it "clean"..

It's now 11 years old and has 24K miles on it, and runs like it did when I bought it in 2004 with 1100 miles on it.. It'd have many more miles, but it has to share seat time with 5 other bikes, and I can't ride them all at the same time..

 

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I clean mine like this:



Seriously, if it's nice enough to wash, it's nice enough to ride, so why wouldn't I be riding?
 
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