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When I was designing my rack for the four week trip I just returned from around the Southwest, I really appreciated other people's photos and input online. So, I thought I would put some photos up here in case they can help anybody else.

This is my first motorcycle, I bought it just a few weeks before the trip. I had never even ridden on a freeway, nor anywhere fully loaded before I departed on the trip. Keep that in mind when criticizing my design. The rack performed exceptionally well on and off road. The stout ammo cans even protected the bike when I layed it down in the soft Utah sand (I was/am a total newb offroad). Also, I am no welder. I just took a beginning welding class at my school so I could make this, and the rack was my first experience using a TIG welder, so it's pretty sloppy. I just tried to overbuild it to compensate for my poor welding job.

Total Cost:
30 feet of square steel tubing: $20
ammo cans: $30/each
hardware: $10















 

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Too many apologies in there! Don't apologise for your riding skills,;we all started somewhere and don't do your fabrication work an injustice - be proud of what you did. I think it's a fine testament to your skills for your rack to have lasted an on/off road trip with no issues.

I had a professionally manufactured Renthal rack that I certainly can't speak as highly of! What a waste of money that was! Grrr!

Anyway, congratulations on taking the bull by the horns and getting the job done. Particularily like the relocated indicators - nice job! :)
 

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You're right, UK...I always brace myself for insults when posting anything online, but I forgot that the KLR community is not as harsh a critic as the rest of the web.

The indicators were a struggle. I didn't like the long shaft that they were attached to, made them look awkward anywhere I put them. So I cut it off, drilled a hole in the back of the housing, and welded tabs onto the rack to support them. I'm really pleased with the way they turned out.

The spare indicators that I had, I put at the bottom of the rack and wired them into the license place light so they are always on when the ignition is on. Those, coupled with the reflective tape on the ammo cans, make me more visible at night, I reckon.
 

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Mr. Miyagi, Very nice! I have a rack sold by the 'company that must not be named' (Named after an old now-defunct American car maker) - they are flimsy to say the least. A couple not-so-rough lay downs and they tend to warp. Yours are solid! I may use your methods to try crafting something better. The junk I have likely won't hold the heavier ammo cans well.
 

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Yup, Mr Miyagi... good on you sir.

Looks strong enough to thwart a couple of tip overs. and, it looks sharp all decked out.
 

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Nice Work
 

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:35a: Bravo!
 

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It is a little bit bulky, but I like that for extra storage.

You may be able to fit things on the inside of the rack. I am going to try with my Happy trails rack... we shall see when I get the ammo cans mounted.

Plus the field test success makes this a good project. :)
 

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Wow I really need to learn some basic welding and maybe attempt something like that. That is exactly what I need/want. I just ordered a couple pelican cases but havn't decided what rack to buy. I might attempt something like this in an effort to save a few hundred dollars on a rack...
 

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The best rack I've seen is the Pack Rat , but I learned to weld while making my own. Isn't as nice as the Pack Rat, but is functional. Learning to weld means you can do lots of fun stuff in the future too. New life skills are always a plus!
 
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