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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just being curious as I am the "fire n' go" type after only 15-30
seconds to get the oil upstairs.


Also, I baby the bike for at least a mile before gradually adding stupidity.

It's probably best to fast idle at least a minute, and I know many riders
start the bike before adding the helmet and gloves while the temp comes up.

Also knew a couple who hit the starter then basically rolled out the clutch
with the choke on and rode off over the years, etc.

From an experienced wrench or two (this means you Tom lol) I'd like to
know A) when it's safe to drive gently. And B) when can we safely start
beating the pizzzz out of our beloved KLR's?

Thanks in advance for some real info. I've had good luck with the 15-30
second rule but have no idea if some cams have flattened a bit over the years.

CheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeapAndStillLearning
 

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Mark -

I'm of the school that fires the bike up and, after just a few seconds, moves the choke lever forward to get it off of fast idle. Then I put on my helmet and gloves, do a pre-ride to make sure the headlights work, the turn signals work, the brake light and tail light work, all my zippers are closed, and then mount up and ride off. The cams should see oil within 10 seconds at the outside.

This ritual probably takes less than a minute.

I don't have a rule about babying the bike for a few minutes, as it would take me about 10 minutes to get to a place where I could open it up and I'm not real big on hard acceleration anyway.

All this is just my preference and I pretty much do the same with the BMW and the Subaru.

They say that most of the wear on an engine occurs during the first few seconds of start-up and they also say that idling an engine for an extended period of time to warm it up is unnecessary and may not be especially good for it. I have no idea who 'they' are, but that's what they say. They are probably cosmetic surgeons who own Ferraris and hang out on Bob Is The Oil Guy forums.

Tom
 

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Nothing wrong with either procedure.

I do encourage owners to leave the enrichener on long enough so that when backed down or off, the barely warm engine will go to slow idle or normal idle speed before shifting into gear.
Less 'clunk' of gear engagement/easier on first gear dogs, imo only.
 

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If it's a big problem, that clunk can be helped a lot by putting the bike in gear, pulling in the clutch, and rolling the bike forward a few feet before starting. That breaks the 'stiction' between the steel and fiber plates in the clutch.

Tom
 

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I try to teach riders to squeeze and HOLD the clutch lever, blip the throttle 3 times. Let the engine return low idle. Then click it into gear.
Much easier than dog paddling a cold clutch with engine in gear!
Especially short legged riders, unlike Tom and I.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Due to my idle screw out almost 2 turns I'm off the choke before rolling.

Good points on the sticky clunky cold clutch pack. If the bike doesn't get rolled a
few feet the thing jerks when I click down on the shifter. Pushing a KLR isn't much fun
no matter how tall ya are. lol The rev trick seems to sync everything up too.

The most annoying part of teaching a new rider is to convince them to pick their feet
up. "it's rolling, use the footpegs". (gigglesnort)
 

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Living in Northern Canada means starting engines in cold temps.
I have never been able to figure out why the engine would care if the chassis is stationary or moving while the engine is warming up. If the temp is so cold that you need defrost heat to clear the windshield is the only thing I can think of. Certainly I am not condoning hard acceleration on a cold engine but see nothing wrong with light acceleration and cruising at moderate throttle inputs.
Hard acceleration or high rpm CAN induce cold seizing the piston as the piston can expand quicker than the cylinder while warming up quickly.
jj
 

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Due to my idle screw out almost 2 turns I'm off the choke before rolling.
I think that many carbureted bikes are overly rich. Being able to start/run in cold temps without the enrichener is one indication that the pilot system may be too rich. BTW, I'm at 1 3/8 turns out with my 685.

Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One and 7/8ths here. It only starts and idles chokeless in the summer.
I probably am a bit rich. Getting still around 50 mpg so I have to be somewhere close.
One washer on stock polished needle, and more for engine safety at 6,000 rpms a
juicy 150 main. Stock pilot jet. I run 90% of the time on the low jet and the needle.
Weighing 150 lbs probably helps too. lol

CheapSkinnyBassTurd

You are right though, Ron. I've known too many dudes over the decades using
massive dynojet kits, crank out the idle screw 2+, drilled up the vac sliders big,
etc. Kinda pointless and definitely overkill. (My attempt is to hit optimal from
what the EPA has stolen.)
 

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One and 7/8ths here. It only starts and idles chokeless in the summer.
I probably am a bit rich. Getting still around 50 mpg so I have to be somewhere close.
One washer on stock polished needle, and more for engine safety at 6,000 rpms a
juicy 150 main. Stock pilot jet. I run 90% of the time on the low jet and the needle.
Weighing 150 lbs probably helps too. lol

CheapSkinnyBassTurd

You are right though, Ron. I've known too many dudes over the decades using
massive dynojet kits, crank out the idle screw 2+, drilled up the vac sliders big,
etc. Kinda pointless and definitely overkill. (My attempt is to hit optimal from
what the EPA has stolen.)
I'm with you on all that. :)

It's repeated so often (especially since the advent of the internet) that all bikes are lean from the factory. I guess it's no wonder that so many believe it as true. A more accurate approach might be to say that some are lean, some are not. Probably even more accurate would be to say that many (if not most) bikes may be lean or rich in certain carb circuits, not necessarily all circuits.

Originally with my bike, the pilot circuit adjustment was too rich. It was set at 1 3/4 turns from the factory. I'm now at 1 3/8 turns. The mid-range was and is still good with the oem needle. I tried the N1TB needle once and found it too rich and essentially just not right (for my engine). The main circuit was overly rich. Now with the 685 I am running a 138.

BTW, here are some exhaust readings.

Idle (1200 rpm)
HC 35ppm
CO 0.23%

3000 rpm
HC 35ppm
CO 0.4%

Keep in mind that these are after the converter.

Ron :)
 
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