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Interesting thread. It says a lot about the bike that guys with the cash to get whatever they want choose the klr. I was so broke for so much of my life that good value will be with me forever. I do pretty well now and am not broke and I choose the klr. I drive an Audi R8 as my daily for the same reason. It’s a great great value and no the fastest car on the road, not the most comfortable and arguably not the coolest. But it does them all very well for a good price.

and my other bikes all do some things really well but none do them all. The klr checks more boxes that most. The harleys speak to my love of motorcycle culture but I can’t say they are really the best of anything. My road glide is a decent tour bike, sportster good around city bike, tiger great at more road oriented touring. But the klr is good at all of that and half the price. I do wish it had a bit more power, but it’s enough. Learning to be happy with enough is a skill in life I think.
 

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For me riding the KLR is a love/like relationship..... I have done the entire Baja peninsula on a KLR, but loaded it in the back of my pickup and hauled it from North Idaho to Yuma Az. (1250 mi.) before unloading. I'm not sure I would want to do all that pavement on the KLR (not to say I wouldn't) I did a 6 state tour on my GS 1200, 2200 mi (75% pavement) and loved it, but I wouldn't want the GS down in the Baja in the places I took the KLR....deep sand, goat trails, crossing rivers etc. So the answer is: In my heart of hearts, I do enjoy riding the KLR for everything except freeway traffic
 

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I was making a joke about your phrase, “this is my KLR.” “This is my rifle.” Is the opening line from The Rifleman’s Creed. See this link.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifleman's_Creed
My rifles much like my KLR are adapted for me as well. Being well above average in size very little is made that actually fits. I wanted a VMax now that I could afford what I wanted. It fit like my Granddaughters tricycle. I tried the Goldwing my knees were into the fairing, I got to the KLR and the flat seat let me ride where I fit. Lower rear set pegs and extended shift lever accommodated my size 13's I used the side of my boot till I got those. Raising links and heavier springs let me go around corners without bottoming. +2" tubes, progressive springs with full spacers settled the front. A+2" seat with all that also is a great anti theft feature. +36" inseam only. I'm also cheap and lazy. Couple cans of Krylon and some decals and it's custom. I didn't even feel bad hosing it down with Krylon a few weeks after buying it. Crush the subframe and rip out the footpegs? Drag it into my welding facility and start cutting, welding etc. Again less than a month after buying it new. It's that utility piece that you ride hard, put away wet and you can usually count on it. It might get hit with the pressure washer if I'm doing the valves or something but it just looks right with mud hanging off of it. I tell all the chrome barges owners that the most beautiful thing about the KLR is that the only thing that I clean is the chain.
 

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A lot has been said in the previous posts, so I don't want to bore you with more of the same. Just that you know where I'm coming from, I'm 6'6" tall, a gear head all my life, and at age 64-1/2 now I've owned motorcycles from all angles of the spectrum, the oldest being a 1947 Indian Chief (beautiful to look at, but a b*tch in every other way) to British, Italian, American, German, you name it, to the newest, my 2006 Ducati Multistrada 1000S DS (coming up on BaT soon), and my 2006 Kawasaki KLR 650.
I've always had a hard time getting comfortable on a bike. I like Harleys, but I don't enjoy sitting on them like I'm on the toilet ready to dump a deuzy. The few bikes I really enjoyed riding were my 1980 Kawasaki KZ1300 and my Multistrada, of which I owned two. I never had the KLR on my radar. It simply didn't exist. Single cylinder, ugly, underpowered . . . I mean, seriously!
Now, slighly lifted and with handlebar risers, I sit on the KLR more comfortably than on any other bike I have ever owned. I can't say that I find the seat uncomfortable, and I can't confirm nasty vibrations. Both of those are non-issues for me. But the main kicker is this: every bike I owned so far was a toy that I pulled out on selected Sundays, wiped the last fingerprints off, and then road about 100 miles to the Rock Store on Mulhulland or along the Pacific Coast. It was always an event, like getting the race car ready. The KLR is different. I just jump on it when I need to get some groceries or need to go to work. It eats the twisties up Highway 33 as competently as any other bike, given that I was never a knee dragger, and I don't have to worry about $1K cam belt changes or electronics to act up and to fail. Silly as it sounds, in early 2028 I will retire to Asheville, NC, and I'm looking forward to riding the Black Moutains and the Blue Ridge Mountains on my KLR. Now that I tasted the entry drug into adventure riding, do I think about a T7? Sure, but unless I'll find a babied, low mileage used one for $6K five years from now, I'll probably stick with my KLR. It may as well be the last bike I own, given that I'll be 70 when I retire.
 

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KZ 1300 is the first motorcycle that actually semi fit me!!! KLR will the JNS pegs, ATV high bars, and padded up seat and raising links fits me pretty well. It's a bitch that they don't make Man sized bikes. I keep checking out M109's and Concourses. They're in the ballpark as well.
 

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A lot has been said in the previous posts, so I don't want to bore you with more of the same. Just that you know where I'm coming from, I'm 6'6" tall, a gear head all my life, and at age 64-1/2 now I've owned motorcycles from all angles of the spectrum, the oldest being a 1947 Indian Chief (beautiful to look at, but a b*tch in every other way) to British, Italian, American, German, you name it, to the newest, my 2006 Ducati Multistrada 1000S DS (coming up on BaT soon), and my 2006 Kawasaki KLR 650.
I've always had a hard time getting comfortable on a bike. I like Harleys, but I don't enjoy sitting on them like I'm on the toilet ready to dump a deuzy. The few bikes I really enjoyed riding were my 1980 Kawasaki KZ1300 and my Multistrada, of which I owned two. I never had the KLR on my radar. It simply didn't exist. Single cylinder, ugly, underpowered . . . I mean, seriously!
Now, slighly lifted and with handlebar risers, I sit on the KLR more comfortably than on any other bike I have ever owned. I can't say that I find the seat uncomfortable, and I can't confirm nasty vibrations. Both of those are non-issues for me. But the main kicker is this: every bike I owned so far was a toy that I pulled out on selected Sundays, wiped the last fingerprints off, and then road about 100 miles to the Rock Store on Mulhulland or along the Pacific Coast. It was always an event, like getting the race car ready. The KLR is different. I just jump on it when I need to get some groceries or need to go to work. It eats the twisties up Highway 33 as competently as any other bike, given that I was never a knee dragger, and I don't have to worry about $1K cam belt changes or electronics to act up and to fail. Silly as it sounds, in early 2028 I will retire to Asheville, NC, and I'm looking forward to riding the Black Moutains and the Blue Ridge Mountains on my KLR. Now that I tasted the entry drug into adventure riding, do I think about a T7? Sure, but unless I'll find a babied, low mileage used one for $6K five years from now, I'll probably stick with my KLR. It may as well be the last bike I own, given that I'll be 70 when I retire.
I'm toying with the idea of putting 17" rims on mine just to play on the asphalt twisties...
 
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I really didn't find it all that tiring. But I'm 43 and lift weights to stay in shape for riding motorcycles. I also rode chicago to Peru over the last few years so have some seat time. I'm not a commuter though and those are the real heros!
 

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Just did my longest day on my 2022, 475km (295miles) of mostly back roads but also some highway riding to get there. With lunch and a few small detours along the way, I was out for about 6.5-7 hours of riding. Back roads and twisties the bike felt just right. These are poorly maintained Quebec back roads, big frost heaves, pavement cracks and chunks of missing asphalt. Although not really off road, close to it and the KLR and suspension worked very well. At highway riding at say 65-70 mph I still find the vibrations very buzzy. The bars and pegs are well dampened, but I still find it works it's way into the seat. Also after a few hours in the saddle, although I find the seat foam comfortable, there is defiantly an uncomfortable slope forward to the seat. I think I may have to pull out the bread knife, peel back the cover and do some trimming to level out the seat a bit. Over all though, got home, no tingling fingers, no numb but, no sore shoulders or stiff neck and a big happy grin.
 

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Just did my longest day on my 2022, 475km (295miles) of mostly back roads but also some highway riding to get there. With lunch and a few small detours along the way, I was out for about 6.5-7 hours of riding. Back roads and twisties the bike felt just right. These are poorly maintained Quebec back roads, big frost heaves, pavement cracks and chunks of missing asphalt. Although not really off road, close to it and the KLR and suspension worked very well. At highway riding at say 65-70 mph I still find the vibrations very buzzy. The bars and pegs are well dampened, but I still find it works it's way into the seat. Also after a few hours in the saddle, although I find the seat foam comfortable, there is defiantly an uncomfortable slope forward to the seat. I think I may have to pull out the bread knife, peel back the cover and do some trimming to level out the seat a bit. Over all though, got home, no tingling fingers, no numb but, no sore shoulders or stiff neck and a big happy grin.
Thats a excellent run. I’ve travelled a bit in Quebec. Imagine some beautiful areas.
 
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