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That is pretty gnarly terrain... Most the trails here are clay or sand, not a lot of rock. My hat's off to you, don't think I would have even attempted that stuff! :bike:
 

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Discussion Starter #22
That is pretty gnarly terrain... Most the trails here are clay or sand, not a lot of rock. My hat's off to you, don't think I would have even attempted that stuff! :bike:
I won't either, next time. I didn't know what I was getting into. Kinda like flying - 1st the test, then the lesson....and you'd best get it right the 1st time.
 

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Question, tho' - every time I've used the front brake - even lightly - in gravel or on that particular ride, the front wheel has skidded sideways and dumped me. What am I doing wrong ??
Disclaimer: I'm a noob.

What I've heard is that you get into trouble in a front wheel skid when you apply uneven pressure to the handlebar, which is really easy to do when you're braking since you're leaning toward them, anyhow. Somewhere I read you're supposed to squeeze the tank so that your body weight presses against that, and then keep featherweight pressure on the handlebar and keep it straight.

Last weekend I practiced (short) front wheel skids on gravel, and the bike was well in control as long as I had everything lined up and didn't turn the handlebar. Any handlebar deflection or lean at all really shoved the bike off to the side during the front-wheel skid. If I hadn't released the brake quickly in those cases, it would have dumped me.

Some people might use a lot of front brake on the loose downhill, but for me, it depends on the downhill. The back wheel will totally skid out more easily, but I'd rather have that one skid out than the front! I use both brakes, and probably more back brake than usual on loose downhill. I also use the back locking up in those circumstances as a gauge of how slick the surface is, and use that information with my front brake control.

I think this is one of those things where you can listen to 20 different pieces of advice, only to figure out later that it's completely different for you. :)

Another trick with the downhill is to turn off the bike, put it in first gear, put your feet on the ground, and use the clutch to "brake" the back wheel. This way you can have both feet on the ground while you do it.

Several weeks ago, I ran around on a bunch of loose river rocks. They were smoother than your big rocks, but still gave me grief. Just unstable as heck. I turned around and went back to the main road. :)
 
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