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Why would anyone want to change their own tires? Isn’t it hard work that usually involves at least one bleeding knuckle? Don’t the tools cost a small fortune when you consider that shops only charge about 25 bucks for the service? Well, some riders don’t live within a few miles of a bike shop. And some folks, well, they’ve always got to do things themselves.

The good news is that, overworked sweat glands aside, changing tires is relatively easy – once you have the right tools. All you really need is a bead breaker, a set of tire irons, some dish soap, and a tire balancing stand.

Begin with your bike on front and rear stands. Once you’ve removed a wheel, unscrew the valve core with a valve stem tool. After the tire has finished its lengthy sigh, place your wheel on an old tire or other work surface. Whatever support you use, you want to make sure the wheel is not resting on a brake disc while you’re working on the bead. Discs bend all too easily and are quite expensive.
Read more about How To Change Motorcycle Tires at Motorcycle.com.
 

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Tire changing

Why do all these tire videos, show tires with much more flexibility than any tire I've ever mounted?
 

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Larry,
That is because you live even farther North than I do. And we usually work on our bikes when its too dreary, damp, cold, windy, etc to Go Ride! If we waste a 80+ degree day just to mount a tire, we feel cheated! lol.
 

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Why do all these tire videos, show tires with much more flexibility than any tire I've ever mounted?
I am convinced it is because they want to make it look easy and they don't want to be seen struggling with a Kenda-270 50/50 knobby.

Those Kenda-270 tires don't get much easier at 95 deg. F either. I am ashamed to say that a couple of days ago I had the wheel off the bike and my tire tools out and was ready remove the old and replace it with a new Kenda-270. After thinking about it a few minutes in the heat, I threw them in the truck and took them to Cycle Gear to be changed.
 

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I got my spoons for when I need them, but for routine changes I pull the wheel and take it to my local shop who mounts a tire I bought at Revzilla or Rocky Mountain ATV while I stand there for $20.
 

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I got my spoons for when I need them, but for routine changes I pull the wheel and take it to my local shop who mounts a tire I bought at Revzilla or Rocky Mountain ATV while I stand there for $20.
I did the same thing last week. I had my tools out and was ready to start the work, but it was really hot out. So, I put my tools away and took it to a local shop. That cost me $42.50. $30.00 for the change and $12.50 for a new tube because they will not change a tire without installing a new tube.

I just returned from Harbor Freight with a new motorcycle tire changer. After two of those $42.50 tire changes it will have payed for itself.
 

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50 bucks here at cycle gear if you bring your tire and wheel in. $20 if you buy the tire from them.
Such a rip. With their equipment it's a 10 minute job including spin balance.
 

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................. So, I put my tools away and took it to a local shop. That cost me $42.50. $30.00 for the change and $12.50 for a new tube because they will not change a tire without installing a new tube....................
50 bucks here at cycle gear if you bring your tire and wheel in. $20 if you buy the tire from them.
Such a rip. With their equipment it's a 10 minute job including spin balance.
The shop I went to in Houston for a $30.00 change plus a tube was a Cycle Gear.
 

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I have watched a u-tube video where you use several big wire ties to get the tire on/ off -once bead is broke. It does work. While I have done many tire changes with tire irons and while using rim protectors, still nervous about scratching the rim. Using the wire ties= no scratches. You can buy long HD wire ties from HF cheap. Agree however if you can buy the tire you want and have it mounted/balanced for a reasonable amount from a shop with a changer ( and the guy knows how to use it) then all is good.
 

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50 bucks here at cycle gear if you bring your tire and wheel in. $20 if you buy the tire from them.
Such a rip. With their equipment it's a 10 minute job including spin balance.
One needs to consider the cost of Both pieces of that equipment. It is not free.
 

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I found out im not a tire guy. My stock 2018 bike tire was bald around 3,000 miles so I got a new bridgestone trail wing TW22. I got the stock tire off fair enough and got the new one on. Went to air it up,,,, and leaked. took it back off part way to get the tube out and I pinched it twice within an inch of each pinch. Got a patch kit and patched it. I could not get it back on the second time. Loaded it up and brought to a shop. Guy said the patch I put on wouldn't hold and I put another hole near the valve stem. So I will have to be a pull it off and drop it off guy, from now on.
I think my new bead breaker will make a good kayak anchor, and the 3 shiny tire spoons can go in the camper utincil droor for people to ask ( what are these for)
 

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lineman1234, You are simply inserting your tire iron too far under the bead & over the rim as you are levering the bead ON. So the tip of the iron is compressing the tube against the rim in the 'drop-center'.

I tell new owners/mechanics that it is best to use 3 hooked irons to Remove the beads and one should only Need 1 flat tipped iron to Install the beads.
Work only 2-3 inches at a time, keep the opposite side compressed into the drop-center and only insert the 1 flat tip till it just slips over the metal rim lip.
 

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Thank you. I tried again today when I got my 2 new tubes.
Baby powdered a new tube n got her in. Windexed the heck out of tire every move. 3 eighteen inch tire irons and I stopped before I messed it up again.
It wont play nice the last 8 inches of going on. It's a stock size 70 on 30 off tubeless tire. Bridge stone.
 

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You probably are not keeping the bead mashed into the drop center opposite the last area. I just use my knees, as I am working on the ground or on top a a car tire.

A Motion Pro Bead Buddy or 2 might help you.

Or a Baja No-Pinch tire installer, along with the Bead Buddys. Watch how this guys uses his knees like I do. But he is still kind of fight it, possibly has too much air in his tube.

I personally leave the air valve OUT, so zero air.

More Baja No-Pinch info, https://www.bajanopinch.com/how-to-use-the-tool/

ps, You Tube apparently imbedded automatically, cause I don't know how to.
 

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I tend to the inner tube tire valve EXACTLY like the No-Pinch guys treat the off-road bead-lock. That is the last 3 inches of second bead that I install, with the valve nut pushed against the rim.
 
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