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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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@KnowledgeLackingRider : line6 is just joshing ya. I doubt oil changes had anything to do with that cam plug coming out. As PDW replied, it’s extremely rare.

Finish disassembling and post pictures here, especially the cam journals. Then the experts can advise you what to do next.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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Many auto parts stores will rent you a valve spring compressor, but taking it to a dealer and offering to pay them a few bucks to disassemble it for you will be easier. Use a marker to number the valves and other parts, so that you put them back together the same way.

Take a very close look at the cam. I didn’t see any obvious damage in the pictures you sent. If there isn’t any surface damage, keep using it. As Tom replied, the cam journals look okay, so there’s no need to send the head to Engine Dynamics.

As PDW suggested, if the end of the valve guide isn’t cracked or distorted, you may get away with just replacing the intake valve and hand lapping it to the seat. However, if you have a good reference for a local machine shop, I would have them check and rebuild the head. I think that’s money well spent on a bike with 35K miles on it. Give them the new intake valve to install. Should be about $200 or less.

Tom asked you to measure the clearance between the top of the piston and the top of the cylinder (we have another question in another thread about that measurement). To do this, turn the engine to TDC as Tom explained. Then lay a straight edge across the top of the cylinder from left to right side. Then use feeler gauges to measure the clearance between the top of the piston and the straight edge. You’ll have to clean the carbon off the top of the piston where you measure.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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.55mm sounds about right (that’s about .022”). If you scraped the carbon off the piston, and the feeler gauge slides through with a little drag, then I’ll take your word for it. If you go to the next thicker feeler and it’s too tight, and the next thinner feeler is too loose, then you got it right.

Re machine shop: yes, have them disassemble, clean, check, and replace the one bent valve. If the valve guide was damaged, then they will replace that. You may have to order a new valve guide, but I’m guessing that you won’t need one. They may recommend lightly grinding all 4 valves and seats. If so, then ask them to “tip the valve stems” to keep the clreances the same, otherwise you will need assemble the engine, measure the cam clearances, and then order new shims. Just communicate with them and they should tell you what it needs. It’s not rocket science.

And one other thing while you’re visiting the machine shop: show them your cam. They should be able to easily spot any damage.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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About that cam plug—the machine shop can replace that too. And I’d recommend smearing some JB Weld around it after it’s installed.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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If I need to loosen a smallish bolt or screw, I always reach for my hand impact driver first. It usually works, and I can modulate the amount of impact gradually upwards. An air impact tool always whacks at maximum force, which may not be a good thing. I’ve rounded and sheared fasteners with an air impact wrench more than a few times.

And Jason, maybe you can get the valves out using the 18mm socket and hammer, but how are you gonna get them back in? You’ll need a valve spring compressor for that. Remember, he has a bent valve, and hitting it with a hammer, then the spring slamming the valve back up into the guide, may damage the guide, or damage it more than it already is.

KLR: if you’re going to take the head to a machine shop, let them deal with it. I wouldn’t try to remove the bent valve and possibly make things worse.
 

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2013 KLR 650/692, 2017 HD Electraglide Ultra
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I dunno. Maybe. The valve got bent by the piston coming up and pushing against it while the cam still held it open. Then the cam continued its rotation, lowering the valve back to its seat. Cams are designed with ramps to slowly accelerate and re-seat the valves without banging them shut. The hammer method doesn’t have this gentleness. Hitting the valve with a mallet probably won’t dislodge the keeepers on the first try, so he will probably have to hammer it several times. Each time I wince as I think the the bent stem is getting forced back into the guide by the unconstrained spring. On the other hand, maybe the bend is just above the head of the valve, so the bent part doesn’t get forced into the guide.

At any rate, if he takes it to a machine shop, he will already be paying them to deal with it.
 
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